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Call for retraction of paper about Psychologic Intervention in cancer.

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by barbc56, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    I just happened upon a couple of articles debunking psychological interventions in cancer patients as far as improving survival. Even though they pertain to Cancer there are enough related issues that the me/cfs community deals with such as the lack of quality research, the political aspects of research the pace trial as well as the belief that me/cfs is psychological that make this thread worth posting.

    I have included a lot of quotes as I think this is a very important topic. There are, of course, some very distinct differences between Cancer and me/cfs and hopefully I have addressed this at the end of this post.

    This is the paper the author is talking about.

    Psychological Intervention Improves Survival for Breast Cancer Patients
    From The American Cancer Society:

    While there are very clear differences as far as the scientific knowledge about cancer vs. me/cfs, just the fact that there is mention of issues related to the pace trial are refreshing.

    I would also hope that the fact that while support groups as well as psychological interventions only helping quality of life would not be interpreted as the same as CBC where a negative illness belief is addressed.


    There is mention of individual therapy only improving quality of life, group support is more heavily weighted.

    I think there are still a lot of positives in these articles that show a step in the right direction, even though they are baby steps.

    Barb

    ETA There are several other sources I want to cite but can't find them, (the second time today I have done this.:bang-head::bang-head::bang-head:). At this point I am exhausted (but worth it) and will return when I am refreshed to add these. I was so excited to see this refreshing point of view, I wanted to get this information out there ASAP. Who, me impatient?:rolleyes:








     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    These articles about problems with supposed psychological intervention turn up (for cancer alone) from time to time. This is definitely not the first time.
     
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  3. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    @alex3619

    Interesting. From a quick glance of papers and the meta analysis of these type of studies, (I think is one of the articles that I can't find.), I thought it looked like the prevailing studies which were flawed according to this author, showed favorable results for psychological interventions beyond quality of life and even extending the life for cancer patients. But I could be overestimating? Is this what you are even saying? My brain is not functioning well atm.:eek:

    I would think calling for an actual retraction of a paper like this would be unusual, although I did come across another cancer study that was being called to be retracted. I will try and find this.

    But,as the author says, even if the retraction fails to happen, which is most likely, he is hoping other researchers will become more aware of this issue as his concern is the fact that other studies are citing the original study, "trainers" (not sure what the actual job description would be. Possibly social workers and therapists? :thumbdown:.) working with cancer patients as well as the funding for future research would be biased towards this view. This would foster an attitude that we deal with "blaming" the patient for not getting better.

    His asking to have the study could be self serving and getting attention for the author but that's another subject

    Sound familiar?

    Thanks, Alex

    Barb
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I am saying that grounds for rejecting poor science, spin and hype have occurred before in this area. It is not clear that this kind of approach works very well - psychological interventions can indeed help people cope, but help survival from a life threatening physical disease? Over time these kinds of claims tend to be disproved.

    That is not to knock improved quality of life. Whether you have a limited survival time or a long one, better quality of life is desirable.

    In cancer outcomes the long term survival is the key measure. However any confounds from the treatment etc. need to be taken into account.

    Now I could see the use of doing something similar to the DALYs, and give data expressed as a function of both quality of life and survival time. That would be interesting to explore, and entirely novel so far as I am aware.
     
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  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Ta Barb. There's been some discussion here of Coyne's blogs about this previously (I think).

    I don't know how much to expect as a response from this (tbh... probably not a lot)... although he clearly has a better shot at tidying things up than patients who also have to deal with the prejudices around CFS!
     
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  6. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    @Esther12

    Thanks. There are indeed several threads about Coyne on PR. I was not aware of this.:)

    Barb
     
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  7. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

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    I think it would be useful in the sense it would strengthen the immune system and better cope with the physical stressors of treatment. Stress, anxiety, and depression can wreck an already weakened body. Also like you mentioned improving quality of life is indeed useful. To use a psychological approach to cure any physical disease alone is a different story.
     
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  8. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    It's my understanding psychological interventions only have a temporary effect on the immune system and those effects aren't at a therapuetic level. I'm thinking techniques such as meditation which I like to do, relaxation techniques listening to music yoga which certainly provide relaxation and give you a sense of well but not on the immune system. But it does make sense that stress can make health better or worse but again I'm not sure to what extent this involves the immune system.

    It's a very in intriguing question.

    Everything else yes, especially using psychological approaches without other interventions.

    Take care.
    Barb
     
  9. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

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    Meditation and psychological intervention are two of the same modalities if it is done by a very conscious person, meditation grounds you deeper in reality and brings a deeper sense of stability and equilabrium in Self. However sometimes Pyschological Intervention is a form of Self Inquiry where people can remove false and limiting beliefs, thus less believing in their thoughts, less prone to stress. Etc..
     
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