A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
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BRCA and MTHFR

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by LivingwithFibro, Nov 6, 2014.

  1. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Senior Member

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    Asking for a friend.

    What are the differences between MTHFR mutation and BRCA mutation? Can someone have both? What's the protocol if someone has both?
     
  2. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    To begin with, there is only one MTHFR gene and several BRCA genes. MTHFR is on chromosome 1 and BRCA1 is on chromosome 17, BRCA2 on chromosome 13. My 23andM3 results didn't have a BRCA7 gene result, which I thought was the one most associated with breast cancer.

    Each gene may have several mutations, many of which are innocuous, but some of which have disease states associated with single nucleotide mutations.

    What (or whether) there is a protocol to address these mutations depends on which ones your friend has.
     
  3. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Senior Member

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    Can one have both and could it be that any BRCA is associated with already present MTHFR (any combination)? And what is the protocol for just BRCA 1 and BRCA2? @Critterina
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2014
  4. caledonia

    caledonia

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    I would think it would be possible to have either MTHFR or BRCA or both. Methylation controls gene expression and silencing. Therefore it would be a good idea to make sure your methylation is operating properly so the BRCA gene doesn't get expressed.

    MTHFR is not the only gene which affects methylation. You have to look at the whole methylation cycle and take that into account too.

    If you're still healthy with no problems, you don't necessarily want to start taking methylation supplements. I've heard of people who have caused overmethylation by doing so.

    The first thing I would do is get tested to see what your genetics and functional status is, so you know what you're dealing with, then go from there.

    Then proceed with lifestyle changes which are always at the root. So eating right, getting your veggie and fruits (and NOT being a vegan or vegetarian), avoiding folic acid, gluten, chemicals, toxins, etc.

    Ben Lynch has good info on this on his website http://mthfr.net.

    In fact, here's a great article I just found over there on BRCA and MTHFR, which basically says what i just said -:)-
    http://mthfr.net/the-integrative-ap...n-mthfr-mutation-bigger-than-brca/2014/07/15/

    Enjoy.
     
  5. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    As far as I know, there is nothing about having one mutation that prevents you from having another, so yes, I think one could easily have both.

    The protocol for MTHFR depends on the other mutations you have. Although there are two popular protocols on this site (Freddd's and Rich's), there are others by Amy Yasko and Ben Lynch and Neil Rawlins, all doctors. And I'm sure there are more. A lot depends on your symptoms.

    The protocol, if there is one, for any BRCA mutation would have to do with what the mutation was, what it is associated with, and so on. My own BRCA1 gene shows 25 single strand mutations, but I clicked all the links that said "Yes, I REALLY want to know" and there were no mutations that indicated breast cancer for me. She (or he, your friend) would need a genetic counselor to determine what actions might be appropriate. In some rare cases, I have heard of people choosing to have surgery to remove the tissues that have a very high probability of becoming cancerous. I wouldn't jump to that course of action without a lot of counseling.
     
  6. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Senior Member

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    @Critterina @caledonia
    1. my assumption and observation BRCA gene mutations do not predisposition a client to any type of cancer im guessing they completely misinterpreted the definition for this gene mutation

    it looks like to me that BRCA mutation is conditioned by the MTHFR mutation combinations

    so if u have the BRCA u most prob have the MTHFR
    therefor the diet + environment is resin for cancer but in cases of MTHFR if an individual never knows of how to prevent it, or reverse it (like most of the population aka SAD population) that no doubt that for scientists it will look like the BRCA gene mutation is the cause or that it increases possibilities
    2. whats your view on this subject?
    3. whats your definition of the BRCA?

    4. how do u design the protocol for the BRCA clients?

    5. what questions do u have on this subject or what questions have risen from working with MTHFR AND BRCA CLIENTS
     
  7. caledonia

    caledonia

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    The same methylation treatment works for everybody regardless of which disease they have. There is a broad treatment protocol, but it's individualized for each person according to their unique genetics and functional status. This is a new paradigm for medicine.

    The first thing is to optimize gut function which involves cleaning up the diet, treating any gut infections and optimizing good flora. Then get into SNPs treatment. You have to look at the whole methylation cycle as well as the detoxification pathways.

    You can get an idea of what treatment to try by looking at the SNPs Interpretation Guide linked in my signature below. For breast cancer, as I stated before, I would optimize the methylation cycle so that BRCA doesn't get expressed.

    Then you would want to minimize anything else that would cause cancer, especially breast cancer. For example, I would also be looking at CYP1B1 and COMT which affect the detoxification of estrogen. Estrogen dominance is also a factor in developing breast cancer. You can do cruciferous veggies or certain supplements for that. If you smoke, and have NAT genes, you would want to quit smoking, as those with NAT genes who smoke are particularly susceptible to cancer. Or those with CYP2A6 eating cured meats, etc. (Of course, those things are not really good for anybody...)

    So then let's say you had your gut working well, and were living a toxin free lifestyle, and were taking proper supplemention to bypass your SNPs. A final thing to try would be sweating in a sauna, to help the body detoxify from our polluted world. Ben Lynch does this on a regular basis.

    In fact, Ben Lynch has some great recommendations on his site for general health for those with MTHFR mutations http://mthfr.net/. Basically, it's what I have outlined above. Clean living is the root of prevention. Societies such as southern Italy, who live a stress free non-toxic healthy lifestyle, even though they have a high rate of MTHFR mutations, have a much lower cancer rate.

    I haven't personally worked with any BRCA patients, so this is all conjecture on my part. Note that I'm also not a doctor, just a well researched ME patient. Any information provided is educational.

    Ben Lynch also has a video course on cancer you may find helpful. I haven't personally looked at it yet, but it's on my list of stuff to do, as cancer runs in my family.

    http://seekinghealth.org/product/me...-cancer-in-prevention-treatment-and-recovery/
     

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