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Brains With Alzheimer's Have More Bacteria Than Healthy Ones,

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by heapsreal, Jul 22, 2017.

  1. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    http://www.sciencealert.com/bacteri...understanding-and-treating-alzheimer-s/page-2

    New research shows bacteria that break through the brain's defences and infected neurons could play a role in the onset of Alzheimer's, giving experts a better understanding of the disease and ways we could treat it.

    A partial copy of an interesting article i read on facebook with the link above to the original article I copied this from. The research as been published in Frontiers in aging neuroscience.

    Another autoimmune disease that could possibly be a chronic neurological infection.
     
  2. Eastman

    Eastman Senior Member

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  3. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    Seems like another disease that will be incredibly hard to figure out..
     
    Little Bluestem likes this.
  4. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    I have a strong family history of Alzheimer's, and it concerns me, especially since I turn 60 later this year. A couple of months ago, I bought the Vielight Gamma after trying it at my biofeedback clinic.

    I don't know if it could help prevent AD, but it has improved my cognition, which was worse after a recent surgery under general anesthesia. It's my 7th surgery.

    If you do a forum search on Vielight Gamma, you can read of my experiences with it. Other people do better with the Vielight Alpha.
     
    NelliePledge likes this.
  5. Webdog

    Webdog Up to 91% remain undiagnosed

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    Same. Several papers have been published about familial early onset Alzheimers from the Calabria region of Italy. My maternal grandmother couldn't remember the names of her children by her late 40's.

    Perhaps the genetic mutation running in my family makes us susceptible to brain bacterial infections? Just speculating here.

    I will check it out, thanks.
     
  6. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    I guess its probably hard to find drugs that treat infections that can cross the blood brain barrier easily. Or for that matter into nerve tissue too which could be a reservoir for infections. It reminds me of the few autopsies on ME patients and found lesions on the brain and spinal cord similar to varicella virus.
     
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  7. Art Vandelay

    Art Vandelay Senior Member

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    Fungal infections have also been linked to it:

     
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  8. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    Identification of Fungal Species in Brain Tissue from Alzheimer's Disease by Next-Generation Sequencing.
    Alonso R, Pisa D, Aguado B, Carrasco L.
    Abstract
    The possibility that patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have disseminated fungal infection has been recently advanced by the demonstration of fungal proteins and DNA in nervous tissue from AD patients. In the present study, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify fungal species present in the central nervous system (CNS) of AD patients. Initially, DNA was extracted from frozen tissue from four different CNS regions of one AD patient and the fungi in each region were identified by NGS. Notably, whereas a great variety of species were identified using the Illumina platform, Botrytis cinerea and Cryptococcus curvatus were common to all four CNS regions analyzed. Further analysis of entorhinal/cortex hippocampus samples from an additional eight AD patients revealed a variety of fungal species, although some were more prominent than others. Five genera were common to all nine patients: Alternaria, Botrytis, Candida, Cladosporium, and Malassezia. These observations could be used to guide targeted antifungal therapy for AD patients. Moreover, the differences found between the fungal species in each patient may constitute a basis to understand the evolution and severity of clinical symptoms in AD.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28387676
     
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  9. RogerBlack

    RogerBlack Senior Member

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    But, as always, this doesn't answer causation well.

    Is there bacteria / fungus in the brain because the normal immune mechanisms in the brain are breaking as a consequence of AD and bacteria are happening to infect them, or is it the other way round.

    The brain is not, as has been assumed in the past - a completely sterile organ.
    There is immune activity going on in it in a carefully managed way, and barriers that are designed (*) carefully to keep stuff out.
    Keeping the brain free of infection is a careful balance between allowing the right nutrients and cells in, and dealing with leakers carefully.
    The massive dysfunction and structural changes in AD changing the blood-brain-barrier properties and the immune system reaction in the brain so it doesn't work as well would be entirely unsurprising.

    (* not actually designed)
     
  10. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    another brick in the wall of polymicrobial origin of Alzheimer (fungi and bacterias) published in 2017

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5514053/

    "Several studies have advanced the idea that the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) could be microbial in origin. In the present study, we tested the possibility that polymicrobial infections exist in tissue from the entorhinal cortex/hippocampus region of patients with AD using immunohistochemistry (confocal laser scanning microscopy) and highly sensitive (nested) PCR. We found no evidence for expression of early (ICP0) or late (ICP5) proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in brain sections. A polyclonal antibody against Borrelia detected structures that appeared not related to spirochetes, but rather to fungi. These structures were not found with a monoclonal antibody. Also, Borrelia DNA was undetectable by nested PCR in the ten patients analyzed. By contrast, two independent Chlamydophila antibodies revealed several structures that resembled fungal cells and hyphae, and prokaryotic cells, but most probably were unrelated to Chlamydophila spp. Finally, several structures that could belong to fungi or prokaryotes were detected using peptidoglycan and Clostridium antibodies, and PCR analysis revealed the presence of several bacteria in frozen brain tissue from AD patients. Thus, our results show that polymicrobial infections consisting of fungi and bacteria can be revealed in brain tissue from AD patients."
     
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