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BRAIN FOG: What has helped?

Discussion in 'Cognition' started by dannybex, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    Thanks very much! I'm really afraid I'm going to die in poverty
    I've been taking sam-E which a forum said helps with math and lecithin/choline. I'm foggy a lot with heavy cloudiness and unable to remember or learn. I've been taking methyl b12, methyl folate and iron for fog and also to raise my RBC and low iron. I can't exhale and am on a ventilator. Neurologist said that the neurons in my brainstem are malfunctioning causing central sleep apnea. I'm so exhausted after going to one class and can't study
     
  2. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    No I'm sure that neurontin improves sleep and at 600mg increases slow wave sleep and energy and clarity the next day along with klonopin, but not everyone has my specific sleep disorder
     
  3. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    thanks so much!!! what are the 30 items? my b12 level 6 years ago was 200 and I was probably severely damaged in the brain and now it's 1760 after taking daily injections for a month.
    I'm taking 1200mcg of mfolate and 3mg of methyl b12 (puritan's pride ), I feel more energy after taking carnitine fumarate+ALCAR with caffeine but still foggy.
    how do I know if the methylation is working? last year I broke out with bad acne and was hoping that meant I was methylating neurotransmitters and hormones (I was taking sam-e)
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  4. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    HI Physicsstudent,

    12 years ago, and for 13 years or so prior to that, I was taking Dilantin (Neurontin came out later and didn't work as well for me) and Valium. The Dilantin was great for uncontrollable spasms and neurological pain and the Valium was essential too. I was able to discontinue them after a year+ of MeCbl and 6 months after starting AdoCbl along with all my asthma meds, nausea meds, allergy meds and NSAIDS. Further instead of antibiotics half a dozen times a year I haven't had any antibiotics in 11 years.

    You need to find run a trial of MeCbl. In testing 12 brands I found 2 that were any good. There was one brands that was an absolute zero and most of the rest were not much better. That is the biggest holdup these days, fining an effective B12. The remaining one now is Enzymatic Therapy. It was a night and day difference I found. Holding the tablets for 45-120 minutes in contact with oral mucosa was essential for effectiveness. My trials in comparisons to injections, indicated 15-25% absorption over that time period.

    What I found helped brainfog, in order of starting: MeCbl, AdoCbl, Metafolin, L-carnitine fumarate, SAM-e, zinc (adding 50mg, to 65mg total), Biotin, D-ribose. Others have found Vitamin D and magnesium to be essential to even getting methylation started. These are part of my basics. So all the usual vitamins except folic acid, folinic acid or any folate other than l-methylfolate and no CyCbl or HyCbl. All the usual minerals, selenium, chromium GTF, Glucosamine-chondroitin, all the DQ, most of the critical cofactors (those that also got rid of brainfog). I take an 8 factor high gamma E, ginkgo, resveratrol, lecithin, omega3 fish oil, COD LIVER OIL extracted A & D.
     
    physicsstudent13 likes this.
  5. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    Thanks very much dear Freddd!!! I'm very sorry dear friend to hear about your pain and suffering. Low-dose aspirin can prevent mortality from cancer and heart disease (there is some risk of brain bleeding).
    I have been taking gabapentin+klonopin for the hypoxic sleep disorder I have with seizures. I also sleep on an asv and oxygen. There is some correlation between antibiotics and asthma development. I still cannot exhale, it is terrible- I have heard of one person who cured his asthma with a paleo diet.
    Where do you buy methylcobalamin injections please? I found an improvement in my nausea from IV vitamin treatments at an internist. I also take piracetam at 2400mg a day to increase oxygen supply and consumption by the brain. My neurologist Dr. Bazil at Columbia has done studies on it. You can buy ATP at pipingrock.com which seems to be an energy supplement. I also think daily cardio is essential and perhaps a Mediterranean diet.
    www.heartfixer.com
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  6. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    physicsstudent13 likes this.
  7. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    I am surprised that there has been no mention of subclinical hypothyroidism as a major cause of brain fog. Here is a video of Dr Brownstein, a leading thyroid doctor:



    It is only when hypothyroidism becomes severe that it will show on the labs and doctors will treat it, (whereas they treated on symptoms in the past) often with an entirely unsuitable formula of only T4 when T3 is also needed or must be used on its own.
     
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  8. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    Fascinating video, I will have to do it in 'bites' though. @brenda , I would like to send the link to a friend who is not a member on PR, how would I do that?
     
  9. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    @maryb

    Click on the you tube link at the bottom right.
     
  10. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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  11. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    I hope that you see a cardiologist regularly and have an echocardiogram. I read about Pauling liking high doses of vitamin C
     
  12. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Physicsstudent,

    I take 14 grams a day of Vitamin C, initially started because of Pauling, and my 30-40 symptoms at that time in my life but continued after retitrating by effect several times. No cardiologist. I don't have any cardiac problems. When I did, my internist treated me but as I was "uninsurable" and had no insurance, wasn't independently wealthy, and had terrible side effects without benefits, to all sorts of medications, there didn't appear to be any reason to go to a cardiologist. I spent the money I had trying to get pain and neurological problems taken care of. I have never had an echocardiogram. There was never even a suggestion of one. Besides, there was nothing I could afford to do about it anyway. In any case all the CHF symptoms went away with the deadlock quartet, MeCbl, AdoCbl, Metafolin and LCF and have been gone for several years now. Why would I see a cardiologist now? My new doc replacing my internist of 11 years is talking about spinal draws and MRIs because those are indicated by my symptoms now. If you know of something that remains after CHF isn't present any more what is it?
     
  13. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    I would have xray catheterization and a stress echo cardiogram. If the heart failure was due to structural changes or electrical problems in your heart then supplements probably cannot cure it
     
  14. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Physicsstudent,

    That is an invasive test. I have no symptoms indicative of needing it. I have no indications. It is classified as an "invasive" test with very serious possible consequences. Having it appears far riskier than not having it. I'm having trouble imagining why you think it might be suitable. My father was almost killed by an unneeded invasive procedure, and suffered brain damage and impaired quality of life for a shorter life. Not to mention this is no doubt expensive. Am I missing something?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronary_catheterization
    Indications[edit]
    Patients without cardiac symptoms or high-risk markers for a heart problem should not have a coronary catheterization to screen for problems.[1] Indications for testing include patients who are under age 40 and have diabetes, who have peripheral vascular disease, or who have a yearly coronary heart disease event rate greater than 2%.[1]

    ... Death, myocardial infarction, stroke, serious ventricular arrhythmia, and major vascular complications each occur in less than 1% of patients undergoing catheterization
    ^ Jump up to: abAmerican Society of Nuclear Cardiology, "Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question", Choosing Wisely: an initiative of the ABIM Foundation (American Society of Nuclear Cardiology), retrieved August 17, 2012, citing
    • Hendel, R. C.; Berman, D. S.; Di Carli, M. F.; Heidenreich, P. A.; Henkin, R. E.; Pellikka, P. A.; Pohost, G. M.; Williams, K. A.; American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force; American Society of Nuclear Cardiology; American College Of, R.; American Heart, A.; American Society of Echocardiology; Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance; Society Of Nuclear, M. (2009). "ACCF/ASNC/ACR/AHA/ASE/SCCT/SCMR/SNM 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging". Journal of the American College of Cardiology 53 (23): 2201–2229. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2009.02.013. PMID 19497454. edit
    • Hendel, R. C.; Abbott, B. G.; Bateman, T. M.; Blankstein, R.; Calnon, D. A.; Leppo, J. A.; Maddahi, J.; Schumaecker, M. M.; Shaw, L. J.; Ward, R. P.; Wolinsky, D. G.; American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (2010). "The role of radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging for asymptomatic individuals". Journal of Nuclear Cardiology 18 (1): 3–15. doi:10.1007/s12350-010-9320-5. PMID 21181519. edit

    http://www.choosingwisely.org/doctor-patient-lists/american-society-of-nuclear-cardiology/
    American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Five Things Physicans and Patients Should Question
    1
    Don’t perform stress cardiac imaging or coronary angiography in patients without cardiac symptoms unless high-risk markers are present.
    Asymptomatic, low-risk patients account for up to 45 percent of inappropriate stress testing. Testing should be performed only when the following findings are present: diabetes in patients older than 40 years old, peripheral arterial disease, and greater than 2 percent yearly coronary heart disease event rate.

    4
    .... patient’s clinical management or outcomes and will result in increased costs. Therefore, it is not appropriate to perform cardiac imaging procedures for non-cardiac surgery risk assessment in patients with no cardiac symptoms, clinical risk factors or who have moderate to good functional capacity.
    5
    Use methods to reduce radiation exposure in cardiac imaging, whenever possible, including not performing such tests when limited benefits are likely.
    The key step to reduce or eliminate radiation exposure is appropriate selection of any test or procedure for a specific person, in keeping with medical society recommendations, such as appropriate use criteria. Health care providers should incorporate new methodologies in cardiac imaging to reduce patient exposure to radiation while maintaining high-quality test results.
     

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