The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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brain fog from persistent sinus inflammation with gut issues

Discussion in 'General Symptoms' started by arieswmn, Mar 28, 2015.

  1. arieswmn

    arieswmn

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    Hi, I hope it's okay for me to post this; I don't have CFS, but this site has really helped me manage my multiple chronic conditions, all of which overlap with CFS: fatigue, sinus, GI, allergies, dx vulvodynia (mostly gone, now), depression, brain fog. Varying severity for years, relapsing, remitting.

    I've been perusing the threads, but wondered if anyone here could look at the way my symptom soverlap and make some suggestions, as far as what I can try for the brain fog and sinus issues? I'm feeling pretty desperate as far as the brain fog goes. My brain feels turned off, and this is what diminishes my quality of life more than anything else.

    I've had sinus inflammation for as long as I can remember. When I can get it under control my brain fog clears up. However, lately absolutely nothing does the trick. I had surgery this summer. It was worth it because it ended my chronic post nasal drip, but the nasal cavity is still inflamed and red, and the brain fog is still there.

    I know I can get the brain fog under control if I can figure out the cause of the sinus inflammation. But I'm totally at a loss.

    In the past Quercetin helped a lot, but no longer. Zetonna steroid spray works, but I can't use it anymore because it makes me very depressed. Saline rinses do not work. I have dust mite allergy but do everything I can to reduce my exposure to mites. Flaxseed oil and tumeric do not help. Ginger helped at one point but no longer. Sometimes antibiotics help a little. Probiotics do not help. Eliminating gluten and dairy did not help.

    I suspected mast cell disorder because. I have severe reactions to almost all shampoos and soaps. But I've realized I am okay if I use stuff that is absolutely 100 percent fragrance free, so I no longer suspect mast cell disorder.

    Right now I'm taking amoxicillian for a sore throat that's lasted for three weeks. (Waited three weeks to see primary dr, who prescribed antibiotics.)

    I've severe GI issues for ten years. Lately they're much worse. The amoxicillian seems to help, and in the past macrobid for UTIs has helped my GI issues.

    I've already been through the wringer as far as specialists go and honestly don't have the energy or money to see anyone else right now unless there's a pretty decent chance they'll be helpful. (I've seen: GI specialists, neurologists, ENTs, gynecologists, psychiatrists, naturopaths, and an "integrative MD." None have been truly helpful. Psychiatrist's interpret the fog as depression, but antidepressants do not get rid of it for very long, although I do currently take Zoloft.

    Given all this, does anyone have any suggestions for the sinus inflammation/brain fog piece of the puzzle? Everything else I can handle, if I can just feel like myself again.

    Sorry this is soooooooooo long.

    Thanks,
     
    Wayne and oceiv like this.
  2. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    @heapsreal has chronic sinus issues so you might want to search using his name. I know he uses bactrim and flagyl and doxy. Also some compounded thing called BEG spray.
     
    oceiv likes this.
  3. rosamary

    rosamary Senior Member

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    You sound a bit like me at one stage in my life.

    The thing that 'cured' it was a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    But inflammatory (autoimmune diseases) do seem to cause problems all over.

    Have you ever been given a short (powerful drug here) of prednisolone ?

    I just wonder if the impact of that would give any clues.

    But only done under medical supervision.
     
  4. arieswmn

    arieswmn

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    Inflammatory bowel disease doesn't seem to fit b.c. my problems are more constipation with occasional diaherra, and my understanding that IFB is just the latter? Never taken prednisone, kind of afraid of it.

    I'm now wondering if I've just got a post-surgery infection that never cleared up. Before surgery it was not infectious. Post surgery I had an infection that came back twice. The ENT said it was cured because there was no more drainage and snot, but it was still very inflamed. He did not take a culture or perform a CT scan to confirm this. I know you need to perform these tests to truly determine the status of an infection. (My old ENT, who was awesome, would have done so. But I've moved, and can't see him anymore.)
     
    oceiv likes this.
  5. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I posted some information previously in another thread about the supplements that helped with my chronic sinusitis. I will paste this info below, as these supplements may help your sinusitis:
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
    ArunP, xrayspex, ahmo and 2 others like this.
  6. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Several of us have found a connection between gut dysbiosis and sinus problems. I believe working on your gut issues could improve your sinusitis as well. I know this is easier said than done.
     
    Gondwanaland, Beyond, Wayne and 2 others like this.
  7. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Constipation is a symptom of IBS, SIBO, dysbiosis, etc.

    There are some antibiotics that help constipation because they reduce the microbes that can cause it. Neomycin and Erithromycin are two possible ones.

    I don't recommend this, but I'm confessing that I put some Neosporin in my lower sinuses, and it worked really well against what I guess is a long standing bacterial infection. (many years)

    Also, as adreno writes, working on my gut has improved the sinus issues greatly.
     
  8. arieswmn

    arieswmn

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    Thanks for the many suggestions!

    At one point I was diagnosed with IBS. I definitely have GI issues but I don't know if it fits the other criteria for IBS, since he seemed to give it to me b.c. he didn't know what else was wrong. Many foods that are supposed to trigger IBS don't bother me, and fiber makes me feel worse too, which is what they suggested when the dxd IBS. (Which is why an infection like SIBO or h pyori seems to fit more? Since antibiotics help.)

    HCL and VSL3 probiotics help, but lately it's just been bad regardless. I take magnesium daily for the constipation. I've had food allergy testing and I'm not allergic to anything. I'm currently taking Florastor, since it's antibiotic resistant. After I finish the amoxicillian I will resume VSL3. However, I will say that the bloating has definitely improved since starting amoxicillian.

    I was also having painful stomach cramps, which got worse as the sore throat got worse. Now those are gone completely.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2015
  9. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    I haven't been diagnosed with SIBO, but the symptoms fit perfectly, and I don't want to go to the (immense) trouble and expense.

    I began treating myself over a year ago with diet and herbals. They helped to an extent, and I still rely on them, but antibiotics really sped up the healing. ( although with side-effects.)

    Amoxicillan, helped some, but it's mild. I don't remember side effects, which is good.

    A low FODMAPs diet can help, if you can find the offending foods.
    A primal/paleo type diet may also work. It's very strict, but many people modify it to their needs.
    Some foods high in fermentable fibers can constipate people with bacterial overgrowth, IBS-C.

    High potassium foods, or potassium supplementation are also good for constipation.
     
  10. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Wayne, ebethc and arieswmn like this.
  11. arieswmn

    arieswmn

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    The herbal antibacterial protocol in the thread is really compelling....In the past Olive Leaf has helped me but the effects tapered off. Maybe I just needed larger doses and additional anti-bacterials.

    I'm now having a problem with the amoxicillian that I've had with levoflaxcin: drug induced worsening of depression. I know it's the antibiotic because it's exactly what happened with levoflaxcin, and a very different, feeling than my usual depression/cognitive issues. I don't know think I can make it through ten days of amoxicillian.
     
  12. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    I posted a blog with my conclusions for a herbal antibacterial protocol after doing some hours of research. It has links to further info. The main point is to use a variety of antimicrobials, alternating them every 4 days to avoid resistance. Olive leaf is one of my favorites, but you need to alternate it. Altho my blog title is Candida, I did a combined purge for SIBO as well. You'll find it here.
     
  13. soulfeast

    soulfeast Senior Member

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    I have been diagnosed with MCAS and have this problem. I have not run into many people who have it. It's crazy. Sinuses inflame and neuro symptoms follow.

    I am using Nasalcrom and Nasocort to try and get through the rest of ragweed and mold season. This blew up when mold counts increased in June and went in an extreme direction. My spine was inflamed. My gait would go of and I had peripheral nerve problems.. creepy sensations that drove me nuts.

    This improved on vacation to a dry location with low humidity and returned and escalated within a few weeks of returning home (I have done the home mold inspection after leaving two homes and belongings)

    ENT checked for infections (I've has some nasty ones in the past) and I was fine but inflamed. He prescribed cromolyn sodium to be atomozed (rather than nebulized) into sinuses. This helped. Atarax helps with brain inflammation but didn't do much for the more systemic issues.

    I have added back in some supplements that address microglial activation (and mast cell activation as well) and am waiting for a script for LDN. Using Hip's list from another thread.

    I think this may be mast cell-microglial activation issue for me. Will see..

    Microglia and mast cells: two tracks on the road to neuroinflammation

    http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22516295

    Abstract

    One of the more important recent advances in neuroscience research is the understanding that there is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Proinflammatory cytokines play a key role in this communication. The emerging realization is that glia and microglia, in particular, (which are the brain's resident macrophages), constitute an important source of inflammatory mediators and may have fundamental roles in CNS disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to proinflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, principally those of immune origin. Mast cells are of particular relevance in this context. These immunity-related cells, while resident in the CNS, are capable of migrating across the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers in situations where the barrier is compromised as a result of CNS pathology. Emerging evidence suggests the possibility of mast cell-glia communications and opens exciting new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating the activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization, both peripherally and centrally. This review aims to provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells, in particular, and the possibility that mast cell-microglia crosstalk may contribute to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerate disease progression, as well as promote pain transmission pathways. We conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signaling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings.—Skaper, S. D., Giusti, P., Facci, L. Microglia and mast cells: two tracks on the road to neuroinflammation.

    Mast cells, glia and neuroinflammation: partners in crime?

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/imm.12170/full

    Summary
    Glia and microglia in particular elaborate pro-inflammatory molecules that play key roles in central nervous system (CNS) disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, mainly those of immune origin such as mast cells. The latter are found in most tissues, are CNS resident, and traverse the blood–spinal cord and blood–brain barriers when barrier compromise results from CNS pathology. Growing evidence of mast cell–glia communication opens new perspectives for the development of therapies targeting neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells that normally control neuronal sensitization – both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be up-regulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamine family. One such member, N-palmitoylethanolamine is proposed to have a key role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the face of external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. N-Palmitoylethanolamine has proven efficacious in mast-cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This review will provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells and the possibility that mast cell–microglia cross-talk contributes to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerates disease progression, as well as promoting pain transmission pathways. We will conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signalling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2015
  14. arieswmn

    arieswmn

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    Hi soulfeast, this could definitely be a mast cell issue for you. However, I was recently diagnosed with UARS, and I'm hoping that that is what is causing my constant brain fog and sinus inflammation. Dr. Steven Park, a ENT specializing in sleep disordered breathing, says that it can cause "false" allergies, where the person's body is in such a state of stress that they start having allergy like symptoms all the time. (He doesn't use the word false, but says they are somehow not actual allergies.)

    Prior to the diagnosis I found myself reacting to more and more substances, things that I was previously fine with. It got to the point where I was using plain olive oil soap (even for shampoo!) and nothing else, rinsing my sheets multiple times, taking all kinds of extreme measures and still having allergy like symptoms. With a noticeably swollen face etc, sinus swelling ,and daily headaches. I'm actually lucky that a neuromusclar dentist suggested I get a sleep study, as it wasn't something I"d really considered looking into it.

    I just started using a dental appliance for my sleep issues. Last night was actually the first time I used it. Today my eyes are somewhat less swollen, and my brain fog is somewhat improved. So I'm optimistic, anyways.

    I did have initial very positive results with Quercetin. But as it turns out Quercetin is great for free radicals, and sleep disorded breathing can lead to oxidative stress and free radicals! I may Quercetin back in, now that I may have gotten to the initial symptom trigger.
     
  15. IcyBlue22

    IcyBlue22

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    I suffer from so much that the first poster describes. For me Quercitin helps at times especially for greater mental clarity and more natural breathing. But... it causes me to have joint pains and this is even from just small 50mg doses. Usually not on the first day but 2nd day and onward it becomes bit obvious.

    Why is this and what can I take to reverse any Quercitin induced joint pains? Are there any good combos for quercitin? I know it boosts the levels of other substances when taken together.
     

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