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Lessons from ME/CFS: Finding Meaning in the Suffering
If you're aware of my previous articles here at Phoenix Rising then it's pretty clear that I don't generally spend my time musing upon the philosophy of the disease. I find it better to spend my time reading research and trying my best to break it down to its core elements and write...
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Borrelia – In the Lymelight

Discussion in 'Phoenix Rising Articles' started by Phoenix Rising Team, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Nielk

    Nielk

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    I'm sorry Snow about your pains.:(
    snowathlete likes this.
  2. merylg

    merylg Senior Member

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  3. merylg

    merylg Senior Member

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  4. merylg

    merylg Senior Member

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    heapsreal likes this.
  5. merylg

    merylg Senior Member

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  6. atoska

    atoska

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    Thanks @merylg for sharing the podcast! Very interesting! Are you diagnosed with lyme?
  7. merylg

    merylg Senior Member

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  8. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17578772

    Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Jul 15;45(2):149-57. Epub 2007 Jun 5.
    Counterpoint: long-term antibiotic therapy improves persistent symptoms associated with lyme disease.
    Stricker RB.
    Author information
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Controversy exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. Patients with persistent symptoms after standard (2-4-week) antibiotic therapy for this tickborne illness have been denied further antibiotic treatment as a result of the perception that long-term infection with the Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, and associated tickborne pathogens is rare or nonexistent.

    METHODS:
    I review the pathophysiology of B. burgdorferi infection and the peer-reviewed literature on diagnostic Lyme disease testing, standard treatment results, and coinfection with tickborne agents, such as Babesia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella species. I also examine uncontrolled and controlled trials of prolonged antibiotic therapy in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease.

    RESULTS:
    The complex "stealth" pathology of B. burgdorferi allows the spirochete to invade diverse tissues, elude the immune response, and establish long-term infection. Commercial testing for Lyme disease is highly specific but relatively insensitive, especially during the later stages of disease. Numerous studies have documented the failure of standard antibiotic therapy in patients with Lyme disease. Previous uncontrolled trials and recent placebo-controlled trials suggest that prolonged antibiotic therapy (duration, >4 weeks) may be beneficial for patients with persistent Lyme disease symptoms. Tickborne coinfections may increase the severity and duration of infection with B. burgdorferi.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Prolonged antibiotic therapy may be useful and justifiable in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease and coinfection with tickborne agents.
    merylg and Valentijn like this.
  9. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19140878

    Scand J Immunol. 2009 Jan;69(1):64-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3083.2008.02191.x.
    Complement split products c3a and c4a in chronic lyme disease.
    Stricker RB, Savely VR, Motanya NC, Giclas PC.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Complement split products C3a and C4a are reportedly elevated in patients with acute Lyme disease. We have now examined these immunologic markers in patients with chronic Lyme disease compared to appropriate disease controls. The study population consisted of 29 healthy controls, 445 patients with chronic Lyme disease, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and six patients with AIDS. The Lyme disease patients were divided according to predominant musculoskeletal symptoms (324 patients) or predominant neurologic symptoms (121 patients). C3a and C4a levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. All patients with chronic Lyme disease and AIDS had normal C3a levels compared to controls, whereas patients with SLE had significantly increased levels of this marker. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease and AIDS patients had significantly increased levels of C4a compared to either controls, patients with predominant neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease or SLE patients. Response to antibiotic therapy in chronic Lyme disease was associated with a significant decrease in the C4a level, whereas lack of response was associated with a significant increase in this marker. In contrast, AIDS patients had persistently increased C4a levels despite antiretroviral therapy. Lyme patients with positive single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans had significantly lower C4a levels compared to Lyme patients with normal SPECT scan results. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease have normal C3a and increased C4a levels. This pattern differs from the increase in both markers seen in acute Lyme disease, and C4a changes correlate with the response to therapy in chronic Lyme disease. C4a appears to be a valuable immunologic marker in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease.

    PMID:
    19140878
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Blue likes this.
  10. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    Anyone with Lyme have these C3a and C4a tests? Did the results lie up with the above study? Where does one get a C3a and C4a test and are they reliable (woth the time and money)?
  11. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    At least someone is trying to find screening tests...this is for CFS but I'm also looking for a similar study for lyme and other bacterial infections impact on B, T and NK cells as a potential marker simile to CD57. This is also a relatively new study, 2013, so maybe we can expect more o the CFS and Lyme screening options. I wish CD57 NK had been included in this study.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23514202

    J Transl Med. 2013 Mar 20;11:68. doi: 10.1186/1479-5876-11-68.
    Screening NK-, B- and T-cell phenotype and function in patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
    Curriu M, Carrillo J, Massanella M, Rigau J, Alegre J, Puig J, Garcia-Quintana AM, Castro-Marrero J, Negredo E, Clotet B, Cabrera C, Blanco J.
    Author information
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating neuro-immune disorder of unknown etiology diagnosed by an array of clinical manifestations. Although several immunological abnormalities have been described in CFS, their heterogeneity has limited diagnostic applicability.

    METHODS:
    Immunological features of CFS were screened in 22 CFS diagnosed individuals fulfilling Fukuda criteria and 30 control healthy individuals. Peripheral blood T, B and NK cell function and phenotype were analyzed by flow cytometry in both groups.

    RESULTS:
    CFS diagnosed individuals showed similar absolute numbers of T, B and NK cells, with minor differences in the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. B cells showed similar subset frequencies and proliferative responses between groups. Conversely, significant differences were observed in T cell subsets. CFS individuals showed increased levels of T regulatory cells (CD25+/FOXP3+) CD4 T cells, and lower proliferative responses in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, CD8 T cells from the CFS group showed significantly lower activation and frequency of effector memory cells. No clear signs of T-cell immunosenescence were observed. NK cells from CFS individuals displayed higher expression of NKp46 and CD69 but lower expression of CD25 in all NK subsets defined. Overall, T cell and NK cell features clearly clustered CFS individuals.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Our findings suggest that alterations in T-cell phenotype and proliferative response along with the specific signature of NK cell phenotype may be useful to identify CFS individuals. The striking down modulation of T cell mediated immunity may help to understand intercurrent viral infections in CFS.
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014
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  12. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3108755/

    Great article, takes IDSA to task for their blatant conflict of interest and the other issues many of us have learned the hard way like 'abysmal clincal testing'.

    Here is the abstact posted at NIH for this article:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21694904

    Infect Drug Resist. 2011;4:1-9. doi: 10.2147/IDR.S15653. Epub 2011 Jan 7.
    Lyme disease: the next decade.
    Stricker RB, Johnson L.
    Author information
    Abstract

    Although Lyme disease remains a controversial illness, recent events have created an unprecedented opportunity to make progress against this serious tick-borne infection. Evidence presented during the legally mandated review of the restrictive Lyme guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has confirmed the potential for persistent infection with the Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, as well as the complicating role of tick-borne coinfections such as Babesia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella species associated with failure of short-course antibiotic therapy. Furthermore, renewed interest in the role of cell wall-deficient (CWD) forms in chronic bacterial infection and progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of biofilms has focused attention on these processes in chronic Lyme disease. Recognition of the importance of CWD forms and biofilms in persistent B. burgdorferi infection should stimulate pharmaceutical research into new antimicrobial agents that target these mechanisms of chronic infection with the Lyme spirochete. Concurrent clinical implementation of proteomic screening offers a chance to correct significant deficiencies in Lyme testing. Advances in these areas have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in the coming decade.

    KEYWORDS:
    Borrelia burgdorferi, L-forms, Lyme disease, biofilms, cysts, proteomics
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014
    merylg likes this.
  13. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Yes

    Not for me

    I had mine drawn at Quest and sent to National Jewish Hospital for testing.

    My insurance covered it so I can't comment about the money. I did it with other testing so I can't comment about the time. But it didn't answer any questions for me.

    That said, I have a LOT going on other than simply Lyme. I can't say what would happen in someone who *only* had Lyme (though I actually think that would be pretty darn rare!).
    roxie60 likes this.
  14. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    This abstract sounds interesting but I cant find the article or study it is associated with.....anyone find if there is more to this than just the abstract?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16498239

    Chemotherapy. 2006;52(2):53-9. Epub 2006 Feb 22.
    Lyme disease: the quest for magic bullets.
    Stricker RB, Lautin A, Burrascano JJ.
    Author information
    Abstract

    Lyme disease represents a growing public health threat. Recent molecular and genetic studies have confirmed that Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is one of the most complex bacteria known to man. Affinity for multiple cell types and the presence of non-replicating forms of B. burgdorferi have contributed to persistent infection and failure of simple antibiotic regimens. The controversial clinical science of Lyme disease has impeded reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of this protean illness. Two major clinical hurdles are the absence of a therapeutic endpoint in treating Lyme disease and the presence of tick-borne coinfections that may complicate the course of the illness. New strategies for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Lyme disease are urgently needed.

    Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    PMID:
    16498239
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  15. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  16. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    For those who have not had a reason lately to get angry over the IDSA and their self centered panel of quacks here is the 'new' guidelines (which look a lot like the old guidelines) for doctors who treat patients with Lyme. BTW these so called 'new' guidelines were a result of litigation against IDSA and their Lyme guidelines.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17029130
  17. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Midwest USA
  18. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  19. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    Although we all know there are mental and emotional aspects to having this disease/illness/infection this article is mostly acceptable to me but there was one statement that nearly started a BART rage.....can you find the sentence that got my BART going???? :mad: Other than the one statement I find the article refreshing somewhat. Hint: it's towards the bottom.

    http://www.mentalhealthandillness.com/tnaold.html
  20. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    So would I as I am considering getting the Bb ELISPOT and Ehrlichia and Chlamydophila test done there. It is a lot of money just not sure if I shoudl do that or just do IGenex again since I have just fiished a 6 weeks round of antibiotics.

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