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Blood test results - help to understand please

Discussion in 'General Symptoms' started by jaybird1, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    Hi all
    I had a series of blood tests three years ago when first diagnosed with CFS which I was told by the consultant as unremarkable (charming!). I have Gilbert's Syndrome with small fatty liver deposits. Previous EPV infection.
    I've dug out the letter sent from the hospital as I think I need to go back to my GP for a check up and discuss a few new symptoms that have cropped up over the last year. I have no idea what some of these blood test results mean, so I wondered if anyone medical could explain them for me and whether they may be of interest to test again for? I'll type out out the results exactly as written in the the letter:

    negative Hepatitis A, B and C
    All lymphocyte counts are normal
    immunoglobulins are normal (apart from a slight rise in IgA at 4.3 but no monochronal band), ANA anticardiolipin, antimitochondrials and smooth muscle, anti-gastric perital cells are all negative, compliment is normal.
    HbA1c is 30 (normal)
    White cells 6.8
    Hb 162
    platelets 2.53
    neutrophils 4.2
    ESR 4.2
    creatinine 74
    albumin 44
    bilirubin 14
    ALT 96
    Troponin less than 17
    CK 53
    CRP 1
    TSH 1.3
    Vitamin B12 309
    ACE 41.

    If anyone could help me out I'd be very, very grateful!
     
  2. Wonkmonk

    Wonkmonk Senior Member

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    Could you post the normal ranges and units also? They differ from lab to lab, so just the one number is hard to compare.
     
  3. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    Those all look very normal to me as a physician. Ranges would help but they look within usual normal ranges. The Hb level suggests that you are male.
     
  4. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    Correct about being male :) thanks for the reassurance, I don’t have the ranges unfortunately so can’t provide any more info.
     
  5. notmyself

    notmyself Senior Member

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    Isn't ALT 96 high?!
     
  6. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    It is yes but probably because of my Gilbert’s Syndrome. I wonder whether a lot of my health issues are due to the liver hence asking what these results are all about.
     
  7. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    Glycated Haemoglobulin, HbA1c of above 6% got me already a TYP 2 Diabetes diagnosis. 30% is only normal if one considers having advanced diabetes normal :bang-head:

    Some consider a B12 already below 500 pg/ml deficient. Would get an additional serum homocysteine to confirm.
     
  8. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    Thanks for replying; I’m overweight (trying hard to lose more) so I’m a little concerned that 30% is only normal against a certain parameter....do I bring this up with my GP?? Last time I saw GP I asked for B12 injections after the CFS clinic said it’s been known to help but the GP was having none of it!
     
  9. notmyself

    notmyself Senior Member

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    i am no doctor..but if something is wrong with the liver,you can have all sorts of symptoms..
     
  10. notmyself

    notmyself Senior Member

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    i assume that by HbA1c 30 you mean 30 mmol/mol not 30 %?!..you wouldn t survive at 30%
     
    pamojja likes this.
  11. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    The most important thing: always request a photo copy of your test results, and do keep oversight by entering it for example in a spreadsheet for seeing in which direction you're going. Most MDs only differentiate normal ranges and where it went that far off, that you're eligible for medications. Many preventives can be taken before that happens.

    By now me too think, mmol/mol must be meant, which would be normal and therefore no reason of concern.
     
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  12. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    No offense, but how did JE miss this?
     
  13. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    I don't know - it's just a number written in a long paragraph in a letter sent from the consultant to my GP. As I'm still alive and haven't collapsed yet I assume it's normal :) I've only been tested once for all of these, but I'm really unsure as to whether the GP will refer me back for tests.
     
  14. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    Lol, you mean once you collapsed and can't read lab tests anymore, that is all their predictive power and why they are performed? Lab test can track the progression or reversal of disease, along with intervention by measuring their efficacy.

    Even if you don't use them to have objective feedback of recovery, it's always worthwhile to keep track of markers a bit off, like your ALT. Which in your case I personally would complement with a more thorough liver enzyme panel (ALT, AST, GGT, CHE, APH, LDH..).
     
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  15. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    Yeah, my GP looking at my lab results also often exclaimed, I'm perfectly healthy again! I just insisted on the most rudimentary biannually, and bargained hard for some of the more rarer lab-test. Because I do know I do not feel healthy, and there must be measurable reasons. At time I do pay for lab-test out of my pocket too..
     
    jaybird1 likes this.
  16. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    Should this be something a GP should have a handle on ie if results of a patient known to them with slight liver issues come back higher than normal that they ask for repeat tests at regular intervals or do I have to chase this up? My GP has been ok but I sensed the last time I saw him (8 months ago about leg tremors, painful muscles and sinus trouble) he didn't look impressed with my list of symptoms (which I have to write down otherwise I forget what to say to him) and just put everything down to CFS.
     
  17. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    That's the problem with the diagnosis of ME/CFS, just blamed for everything where nothing can't be done.

    It always depends on your GP. But realistically, my GP has about 5 minutes for each consultation with me, and if I don't know what I want from him to do, he will neither in such a short time.
     
  18. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    You are right, I skated over it. A isolated ALT at that level would not be a red flag for me with all the other things normal but it is probably outside the lab range.
     
    jaybird1 likes this.
  19. jaybird1

    jaybird1

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    That is exactly how I feel - I know I'm not well, I don't feel healthy and there has to be something causing all the symptoms I have, all which fluctuate and some worse than others.
     
    notmyself likes this.

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