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blood pressure increase as well as heart rate?

Discussion in 'Problems Standing: Orthostatic Intolerance; POTS' started by mobyjoby, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. mobyjoby

    mobyjoby

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    I have been using a blood pressure monitor to see what happens when I go from lying to standing and found that as well as my heart rate increasing my blood pressure goes up rather than down/ staying the same.
    eg last night I was lying down: heart rate 79 BP 114/73
    when I stood up it became: heart rate 115 (+36) BP 132/77
    I'm not sure if that is of any siginficance. I have also done it from walking upstairs mainly to find my heart rate for that activity and, for example, first measurement hr was 143 and BP systolic was 123 then few mins later heart rate had come down to 117 but systolic was now 144. diastolic usually stays around late 60s and 70s but systolic seems to vary a lot more.

    I haven't seen any mention of increased systolic in anything I have read about OI.
  2. ramakentesh

    ramakentesh Senior Member

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    some might suggest this is an indicator of hyper POTS. When bad mine can get to 160
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    You might want to investigate this with a Tilt Table Test--though it is a hard test and often takes some time to recover from it. If done well, it can give you and your doctor a lot of useful information about the function of the autonomic nervous system.

    Best wishes,
    Sushi
  4. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    I had high bp with my POTS. I do not have hyper POTS. My BP is now normal to low. Maybe you can find out more with testing.
  5. mobyjoby

    mobyjoby

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    Thanks everyone.
    I hadn't heard of hyper POTS before.
    I'm in the UK so hard to get testing but I think I can get it done in Newcastle if I can get a referral. Its an "active stand" though rather than a tilt table.
    Sallyblooms - was your blood pressure high all the time? Mine is fine to slightly low when I am supine.
    Jo
  6. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    Jo, my bp was high all the time at first. But when I was lying down or in my recliner with my feet up, it was high/normal. Never good numbers though..

    .. I thought THAT was why I was so terribly ill three years ago when POTS began. The doctors and ER doctors kept telling me my bp numbers would not make me that ill. They were right. It was MUCH, MUCH deeper than blood pressure alone.:(

    Autonmic Nervous system had broken. Autonomic Neuropathy. All organs and systems were not working. Finally a cardiologist suggested it could be Dysautonomia, but he knew little about it. I then looked it up. YES, I had my answer and the journey of healing began. My CFS got MUCH better too. Thankfully, my POTS is so much better thanks to my supplements, and food changes. I am very happy. Hubby and I went to church, out to eat, then to our church outside for a blessing of the pets today. Just got home.

    He told me on the way home, how much better I am doing, how I can stand longer. He doesn't have to worry so much and we are both happy. I know I will continue to heal. :thumbsup:
  7. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    I think your BP there sounds fine to me. Orthostatic systolic hypertension is defined as an increase of over 20mmHg when someone goes from laying to standing. BP naturally does increase when one stands.

    You only noted a raise of 18 on standing (if you are doing activities eg stair climbing..that dont count if you are thinking you could have Orthostatic hypertension as it could be exercise putting the BP up which is normal for both heart rate and BP to go up with exercise)

    its issues with the dystolic and dystolic orthostatic hypertension, which is the hypertension often caused by ME (Dr David Bell talks about this). In my case the systolic can hypertensive too but always the dystolic involved too. (Dr cheney talks about issues with the dystolic side of things too).

    eg my BP on laying can be 80/60 but on just standing go up to 170/138. (quite a severe example of orthostatic diastolic hypertension as there only needs a 20mmHg increase but it isnt unusual for this system when it autonomically faults to really fault). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthostatic_hypertension

    If you do think you may have orthostatic hypertension.. best having a tilt table test. (unlike POTS, it can be much slower to appear on standing). Tilt table test can also assess things like NMH which you could also have with POTS. It is quite possible to have POTS without any BP issues showing up.

    You obviously have POTS thou if you took that BP from standing to laying and didnt go moving around the house.
    ..

    I probably have hyper kind of POTS (as my adrenaline is abnormally high on some of my tests and possibly this is linked to my orthostatic high BP too) ..along with having low blood volume POTS. There is different kinds of POTS and depending on what kind you have may affect what POTS treatments work for you.
  8. mobyjoby

    mobyjoby

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    Thanks Tania
    that HR was taken from lying down to standing with no moving around other than to get upright off the bed.
    But it doesn't seem to stay as high for long. eg after 5 minutes it may go down by 8 or so which means it hasn't stayed at at an increase of over 30bpm although maybe still 25 or more bpm higher at 5 mins. does this mean it might not be POTS? does it have to be sustained 30bpm higher for at least 10 mins? my symptoms seem to fit POTS really well but probably not as severe as many people on here.

    Also is it possible that it fluctuates and some days this increase just wouldn't happen. I seem to have had the increase fairly reliably for a few weeks but haven't tested every day by any means. Then over the weekend I had 2 days where my resting pulse lying down actually got as low as 67 and only oncreased to 80-ish on standing. Then the next morning it went from 88 lying down to 129 on standing (+41).
    I'm woriied about going for testing if there are days when I don't have the big increases.

    Thanks

    Jo
  9. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Ive never read anything anywhere in POTS definitions saying that the raise has to be sustained..

    If you go for a tilt table test.. just make sure you dont go and excessively drink before hand as that can certainly end up making the POTS not show up.
  10. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

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    My BP went through the floor when I crashed out (around 80/50 or so). It's still consistently lower than it ever was before. ...But like you, I have definitely noticed that most of the time my BP goes UP when I stand rather than down. And I most definitely seem to have O.I. issues, as well as POTS-like heart rate increases upon standing. The raise in my BP is not huge most of the time that I've noticed.
  11. toddm1960

    toddm1960 Senior Member

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    I'm also othrostatic hypertensive, the longer I stand, the higher my BP raises. You'll find equal numbers of POTIES with high bp, low bp and no change in bp.

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