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Bjersing et al: Benefits of resistance exercise in lean women with fibromyalgia

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by mango, Mar 26, 2017.

  1. mango

    mango Senior Member

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    Benefits of resistance exercise in lean women with fibromyalgia: involvement of IGF-1 and leptin

    Bjersing JL1,2, Larsson A3,4, Palstam A4,5, Ernberg M6, Bileviciute-Ljungar I7, Löfgren M7, Gerdle B8, Kosek E9, Mannerkorpi K3,5,10.

    BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2017 Mar 14;18(1):106. doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1477-5.

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Chronic pain and fatigue improves by exercise in fibromyalgia (FM) but underlying mechanisms are not known. Obesity is increased among FM patients and associates with higher levels of pain. Symptom improvement after aerobic exercise is affected by body mass index (BMI) in FM. Metabolic factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and leptin may be involved. In this study, the aim was to evaluate the role of metabolic factors in lean, overweight and obese women during resistance exercise, in relation to symptom severity and muscle strength in women with FM.

    METHODS:
    Forty-three women participated in supervised progressive resistance exercise, twice weekly for 15-weeks. Serum free and total IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adiponectin, leptin and resistin were determined at baseline and after 15-weeks. Level of current pain was rated on a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Level of fatigue was rated by multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) subscale general fatigue (MFIGF). Knee extension force, elbow flexion force and handgrip force were assessed by dynamometers.

    RESULTS:
    Free IGF-1 (p = 0.047), IGFBP3 (p = 0.025) and leptin (p = 0.008) were significantly decreased in lean women (n = 18), but not in the overweight (n = 17) and the obese (n = 8). Lean women with FM benefited from resistance exercise with improvements in current pain (p= 0.039, n = 18), general fatigue (MFIGF, p = 0.022, n = 18) and improved elbow-flexion force (p = 0.017, n = 18). In overweight and obese women with FM there was no significant improvement in pain or fatigue but an improvement in elbow flexion (p = 0.049; p = 0.012) after 15 weeks of resistance exercise.

    CONCLUSION:
    The clearest clinical response to resistance exercise was found in lean patients with FM. In these individuals, individualized resistance exercise was followed by changes in IGF-1 and leptin, reduced pain, fatigue and improved muscular strength. In overweight and obese women FM markers of metabolic signaling and clinical symptoms were unchanged, but strength was improved in the upper limb. Resistance exercise combined with dietary interventions might benefit patients with FM and overweight.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION:
    The trial was registered 21 of October 2010 with ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT01226784 .

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28288611

    http://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12891-017-1477-5

    (Indre Bileviciute-Ljungar does ME/CFS research as well. BPS...)
     
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    Yeah, as long as elbow flexion is improved, it must be worth it :rolleyes:
     
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  3. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    I've never understood why medical people use the terms 'upper limb' and 'lower limb' when the rest of us mere mortals find the terms 'arm' and 'leg' quite satisfactory.

    I have no further insight into this study.
     
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  4. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    Presumably so the results can be extrapolated to other species :alien:
     
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  5. Laelia

    Laelia Senior Member

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    There is quite a boring explanation for it. In anatomical language the arm only refers to the area between the shoulder and the elbow (what is commonly called the upper arm) and does not include the forearm. The leg only refers to the bit between the knee and the ankle and does not include the thigh.

    I'm pleased to have remembered something at least from the anatomy module I undertook at university.
     
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  6. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    I hate to disagree, but it wasn't so when I studied anatomy, nor can I find this in a quick web search. Who cares anyway. They're all arms and legs to me.
     
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  7. Laelia

    Laelia Senior Member

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    From Wikipedia:

    In human anatomy, the arm is the upper limb of the body, comprising regions between the glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint) and the elbow joint. In common usage the arm extends to the hand.

    The human leg, in the general meaning, is the entire lower extremity or limb[1][2]of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region. However, the definition in human anatomy refers[3][4][5] only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle.
     
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  8. Aurator

    Aurator Senior Member

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    I knew an anatomist once. Threre were no comfy chairs in his house because he never found anyone who would sell him a forearmchair.
     
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  9. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    Ok you win!
     
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  10. Laelia

    Laelia Senior Member

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    I don't think so! It's all arms and legs to me too :)
     
    trishrhymes likes this.

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