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BIPAP Machine

Discussion in 'Sleep' started by paul80, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. paul80

    paul80 Senior Member

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    Wondering if anyone uses a BIPAP machine and if it helps their sleep? or if anyone had problems with it? Also wondering how noisy they are as i don't want it to affect my partner's sleep. And if anyone can recommend a model that would be great.

    I've just been told i have mild sleep apnea. This is based on giving a sleep study kit home for one night's sleep. I don't know whether to trust that it's mild because my sleep quality fluctuates and i didn't have a particularly bad sleep that night.
     
  2. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    I don't use the machines although I might need to at some point. My ENT says that auto-pap is better tolerated than CPAP, but I don't know about bi-pap.

    There's a lot of discussion on these breathing machines for apnea on talkaboutsleep.com

    How many apnea events do you have an hour, according to the test?
     
  3. paul80

    paul80 Senior Member

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    I don't know, i just got told i have "mild sleep apnea".

    I think the BIPAP ones are the best, from what i've read.
     
  4. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    Whoever ordered your at-home sleep test will give you the results if you ask. It is useful to know things like how many hypopneas you have an hour and what your O2 levels are.

    Some of our members have machines, and I hope they will respond to this thread, but talkaboutsleep.com has loads of people on the machines, and you could probably get more responses if you sign up for that site and go to the forums.

    There appear to be a lot of other forums, too, when you google sleep apnea forums:

    https://www.google.com/#q=sleep apnea user forums us
     
  5. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Are you in the USA? You don't say. Might make a difference on whether you can pick your machine. I think the only way you might be able to "select" a different machine, is by using 1 Medical equipment company over another. I you are not in the boonies, you should have at least 2 choices of companies.

    My ex-GF got me into the habit of using a sound machine, and my sleep machine is no louder than that. Haven't had a partner in years, so the sleep machine is not an issue for me. Better than my snoring, from what I am told.

    Seems weird that you only did the At home test for sleep onlly 1 night, I did mine this spring, and was 2 nights. And after being on that for about a month, I asked for testing of my oxygen levels. So they sent me home with a device that tested that for 1 night.

    My sleep Dr prescribed 1L/min of Oxygen while I slept. Then sent my Oximeter sleep results to my Specialist for my CFS/CFIDS/ME and Fibromyalgia, and he re-prescribed me Oxgyen at 4L/min.

    GG
     
  6. paul80

    paul80 Senior Member

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    I'm in the UK. I need to ask them about the details of the test, thanks.

    GG did the machine on it's own not boost your oxygen levels? or just not enough so you needed extra oxygen.

    I was hoping to be able to trial one and return it if it didn't help my sleep but i can't find a company that does this.
     
  7. tiredallday

    tiredallday

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    I started with a CPAP machine 7 years ago, then went to a BiPAP when they came out, and now use an APAP, which is the most comfortable of the lot. Stopping breathing at night is bad for your heart and brain (kills brain cells). But APAP can reverse the damage after a year of use.

    I feel more rested after sleep and more alert during the day. The sleep doctors I have consulted are not very helpful. They think if you have stopped breathing 5 times every hour you are doing swell. My target is under 1 time per hour. Also, the medical devices company wanted an arm and a leg for my machine. They are much cheaper on line at cpap.com Plus, they include the directions that are usually withheld that show you how to adjust the settings so you can experiment for the best ones for you.

    What helped bring my numbers down is 1. losing weight--in my case about 10 lbs (I am on the thin side to begin with) 2. having the local foam shop make a wedge that goes from zero to 8" that I put under the mattress to raise my upper body 3. stop eating 3 hours before bedtime 4. reading the forums to learn what has helped others. The noise from the machine has not been a problem, but apnea is.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2016
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  8. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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  9. BruceInOz

    BruceInOz Senior Member

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    I have been using a bipap since April. Before that I had been controlling my sleep apnoea by sleeping on my side which I believe was reasonably effective. But I have been getting damage to my shoulder and hip joints that I think was largely linked to always sleeping in the one configuration. With bipap I can now sleep on my back to take the pressure off my sides. I certainly have not noted any improvements in my ME and my sleep is probably about the same as sleeping on my side. Overall it's definitely worth having but I still hate the inconvenience of it!

    I have a Philips Respironics System one, 60 series. It is funded by my state health service so I didn't get any choice in it but it seems to work well. My wife noticed the noise for a while but I think is used to it now. The noise never bothered me - I thought it was quite quiet.
     
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  10. paul80

    paul80 Senior Member

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  11. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    @*GG*, @BruceInOz, and @tiredallday, I have some questions about the masks you use with your apnea machines.

    I am going to try a machine for the 1st time this Wed. It's an autopap, and I'll get help selecting a mask at the same time. I can try them and return them at no charge until I find the right one.

    The one I'd like to try first is the Philips Dreamwear Nasal Mask. What appeals to me is that there's little gear on the face, and I'd like to try the least obtrusive mask first.

    https://www.amazon.com/Philips-Resp...830&sr=8-2&keywords=dreamwear nasal cpap mask

    • Do any of you use nasal-type masks, or do you use full-face masks?

    • If you use nasal masks, do you already breathe very well through your nose? From what I understand, if you don't breathe easily through your nose, you have to use a full-face mask, which involves much more gear on your face.

    • If you use full-face masks, have you found them comfortable after getting used to them?

    • Do any of you sleep on your side while using the masks?
    I'm going to give this a try because for years I've used a dental device to reduce my hypopneas, but I get occasional severe bouts of TMJ when I'm under a lot of stress, such as recently when I had 17(!) in-laws over for a party and a meal. My husband also wears a dental device and has no problem at all with it, maybe because he didn't have TMJ to begin with.

    @paul80, have you tried an apnea machine yet?

    Thanks, guys!
     
  12. paul80

    paul80 Senior Member

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    No not yet, still not sure about it.
     
  13. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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    I've been using a autoPAP machine for several years now, have gone through many face masks (which I hated) and fell in love with nasal pillows. I recently changed the model of nasal pillows I use based on a recommendation from a sleep apnea tech with whom I had an office visit a few months ago. This is what I'm using now because it is the least intrusive thing I've ever used. The hose that comes with it is also very flexible and that also helps a lot:

    AirFit P10 Nasal Pillow
    https://www.amazon.com/airfit-P10-Nasal-Pillow/dp/B0134JA2EC
    The picture there is beyond useless, but you can read the reviews. You don't have to buy anything else (like other accessories) other than your BiPAP machine itself.

    Here are some better pictures and explanations:
    http://www.resmed.com/us/en/consumer/products/masks/airfit-p10.html
    https://www.apria.com/shop/cpap-kit-nasal-pillow-airfit-p10-rmd

    I highly recommend getting a CPAP/BiPAP/AutoPAP machine that comes with a heated humidifier, otherwise your nose will dry out and get irritated.
    I have severe sleep apnea. Without the machine I would be gasping for air all night. It definitely helps my sleep apnea. Unfortunately, it never helped with energy levels.

    There is a card in my machine that records the BiPAP pressure readings every night. The sleep tech I see downloads the most recent month's worth of data and gives it to my sleep doc to review. She also goes over it with me and points out at what point in time I probably fell asleep, how much I snored, etc.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016
  14. BruceInOz

    BruceInOz Senior Member

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    @perchance dreamer I use a nasal mask (Fisher & Paykel Eson Nasal Mask). Although I would have said I don't breath through my mouth, with the extra air pressure my mouth pops open while I'm asleep and I have a large leak through my mouth which dries my mouth out completely. Because of this, I tried the full face mask but the only way to prevent leaks around the mask was to always lie on my back which I did not find at all comfortable since I am used to sleeping on my side. So I use a chin strap and tape my mouth closed with this tape. I need to get a different chin strap because the one I have has a narrow band over my head and my skull is misshapen from it in the morning but seems to spring back by the end of the day. I haven't tried the nasal pillow but wish I had.

    My machine has an SD card to record data each night. I take it out and have a look at it myself every now and then using open source software called SleepyHead.
     
  15. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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    I breathe well through my nose and use a nasal mask. Here are some tips that might help if you have a stuffy nose:
    http://www.easybreathe.com/blog/cpap-when-sick-5-tips

    I've found it absolutely impossible to sleep on my side while wearing any type of mask. There are pillows specially designed for mask use that are very expensive:
    https://www.amazon.com/Contour-Products-CPAP-Sleep-Pillow/dp/B000VLYHI4
    I don't know if you'd be able to return the pillow if you didn't like how it worked. It looks like half the people who returned them got a refund and half who wanted to could not.
     
  16. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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  17. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    Thanks for the help, you all!

    I really hope I can avoid having to use a full-face mask. Before bed, I irrigate my sinuses and use Dymista spray, a combo of anti-histamines and steroids, which really helps my nasal congestion, but I do wake up with some congestion. I also have to wear a mouth guard so I don't grind at night, and it does open my mouth a tiny amount.

    So I'll try the chin strap and the Nexcare tape, @BruceInOz.

    @CFS_for_19_years, the nasal mask you use does look unobtrusive, so I'll check it out. I do find it funny that the men's size is blue and the women's, pink. I wonder if these color distinctions are still even used for babies any more.

    @tiredallday, I think a lot of doctors go along with the 5 hypopneas an hour being acceptable because that's the point where insurance will start paying for apnea equipment. My sleep doctor and ENT both agree that no hypopneas are ideal and that 5 are enough to create symptoms.

    I sleep on a wedge, too, and it has helped my breathing, which helps my sleep. The only thing I don't like about it is looming above my husband when we sleep. He doesn't want to sleep elevated, so it's just on the side I sleep on.

    I'll report back. It seems you have to be patient and work on the right equipment and just getting used to the whole thing.
     
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  18. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    I went to get my autopap and mask yesterday and spent 1 1/2 hours getting trained. I got the AirFit P10 nasal pillow mask--it's the one the consultant uses himself--and the ResMed Air Sense 10 Autoset, a type of auto-pap.

    I didn't use it last night, though, as I had intended, because the guy said I'd need to spend preferably 2 hours in the evening using the machine while resting before bedtime to make it easier to get used to, especially since I've never used an apena pap machine before. That threw me for a loop.

    So I'll figure out how to schedule this into my day, but did you guys do this when you first started using your pap machines?

    He said there's a valve leading to the stomach that needs to get strengthened to handle the incoming air and that using the machine in the evening before bed for awhile will help do that.

    He also said that until that valve gets strengthened there's the possibility of being quite "gassy" during the night. Apparently, it doesn't happen with everyone, but is much more likely to happen to thin women.

    Lovely! I can't wait to fill the bedroom with noxious fumes while I sleep! My husband snickered and said I'd enjoy sleeping in the cat's bedroom, but actually, he's such a sound sleeper that it probably wouldn't wake him.

    Were any of you flatulent when you first started using pap machines?
     
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  19. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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    This is the first time I've heard about something like this. I didn't schedule a time in the evening to get used to the device. I wasn't thin at the time though.

    I did some Google searches and you can find some discussion of it using the terms "gastric insufflation cpap" or "apnea machine gas." Using an autoPap machine probably lessens some of the effect since you're not subjected to a high pressure throughout the night.
     
  20. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    Thanks, @CFS_for_19_years. I used the search terms and found this site, which was helpful.

    http://www.cpaphelpdesk.com/cpap-machines-and-gas.html

    I do already sleep on an inclined wedge, so maybe that will lessen the chances of it happening to me.

    I'll also try just doing 1 hour instead of 2 at first in the evening before bed and seeing if that works for helping me acclimate.
     

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