Lipkin's Monster ME/CFS Study: Microbes, Immunity & Big Data
The Microbe Discovery Project outlines an ambitious new study by top researchers that has collected patient samples, but needs desperately funds to complete the work.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Biotin - A Potential Culprit

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Changexpert, Mar 24, 2015.

  1. Changexpert

    Changexpert Senior Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes:
    91
    Biotin is known as a silver bullet for hair growth. Some people even use biotin for healing stomach and digestive issues. One very popular post from Curezone incorporated high dosage of biotin along with MSM and zinc carnosine to "heal" leaky gut (http://www.curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=870274#i). Unfortunately, this protocol turned out to be not very effective and magnified digestive issues for most people. Since I was suffering from both hair loss and gut issue, I tried high dosage of biotin for three months (up to 13,000 mcg/day). I was gradually getting worse every day in both hair and digestive issues, but despair really screwed up my judgment.

    For the last month, I dropped all supplements that contained biotin, and ironically, I saw improvement in hair, digestive issues, and libido. I fell in for biotin again starting last week and after only 5 days, my hair loss worsened. So this got me very curious to do some research on too much biotin. It turns out biotin can inhibit spermatogenesis, carboxylase activity, which is tied to beta-oxidation of fatty acids in the mitochondria (fat metabolism), and adipogenesis.

    Inhibition of spermatogenesis explains why my libido has been decreasing gradually. For females, there has not been studies on too much biotin and oogenesis, but my guess is that too much biotin would have similar inhibiting effects. Fat and carbohydrates are much easier to use as energy source compared to protein, which is why many people crave sugary and fatty foods when they are stressed; it is a natural coping mechanism. However, decreased beta-oxidation limits conversion of fat into energy and reduces the overall mitochondria activity, resulting in fatigue. Also, decreased beta-oxidation results in lower carnitine level. Lastly, adipogenesis is related to production of fat cells, but I do not understand the details behind this, so I do not want to make any hasty conclusion.

    I realize that not many people on this forum take biotin in high dosage, but if you do or have done so in the past, it might be worthwhile to dig into more studies related to biotin interaction.

    PS: Please keep in mind that biotin is a sulfur group vitamin

    Source:
    Inhibiting effect on spermatogenesis - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25039897
    Inhibiting effect on carboxylase activity/adipogenesis - http://www.jbc.org/content/277/19/16347.full
    Adipocyte - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adipocyte#Cell_turnover
    Adipogenesis - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adipogenesis
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2015
    merylg, August59, Helen and 5 others like this.
  2. nandixon

    nandixon Senior Member

    Messages:
    832
    Likes:
    2,083
    Thanks for posting. Just wanted to mention that, in the reference, it's not biotin itself that inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, but rather a chloroacetylated biotin analog that the researchers made. That enzyme actually requires biotin to function. (Perhaps too much biotin might be detrimental through interference, but that particular reference doesn't indicate that.)
     
    merylg, August59 and oceiv like this.
  3. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,342
    Likes:
    1,179
    Ventura, CA
    It honestly astonishes me how intelligent everyone is here. When I read posts it sounds like at least more then 65% of the posters and commentators have their PHD. Sorry got a bit off topic but I just always found it interesting lol. Great information and thank you for sharing!
     
    PeterPositive likes this.
  4. PeterPositive

    PeterPositive Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes:
    1,033
    Thanks, this is very interesting.
    I am not able to understand how the percentages in the abstract of the rat study would translate to a human dose of biotin. Any ideas?

    Thanks
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page