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Biomarkers outperform symptoms in parsing psychosis subgroups 12/8/15 via NIH

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by *GG*, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Concord, NH
    Cheshire, Woolie, Scarecrow and 5 others like this.
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    In time it will all be biomarker driven. The days of symptom driven psychiatric diagnoses are limited ... but we are still a long long way for doing that for most psych disorders, if not nearly all of them. Thanks for this article.
     
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  3. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    Fascinating - thanks.

    We NEED research like this but do we really need to fret about 'strict' criteria of ME/CFS?

    "The results lend support to the institute’s Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDoC) initiative, which frees scientists from designing research based on traditional diagnostic categories, encouraging them to explore groupings based on genomics, behavioral dimensions, physiological traits, or brain imaging findings. More precise diagnosis is expected to lead to improved treatments."
     
  4. Simon

    Simon

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    Fascinating. Couldn't find the underlying study, though
     
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  5. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    So this confirms what many have been thinking right? That criteria based on description of symptoms are really inadequate in some diseases.
     
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  6. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    @A.B, this is already well known, but the problem has always been what to do about it.
     
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  7. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    @Simon, here is the original article.

    Identification of Distinct Psychosis Biotypes Using Brain-Based Biomarkers
    Brett A. Clementz, Ph.D., John A. Sweeney, Ph.D., Jordan P. Hamm, Ph.D., Elena I. Ivleva, M.D., Ph.D., Lauren E. Ethridge, Ph.D., Godfrey D. Pearlson, M.D., Matcheri S. Keshavan, M.D., Carol A. Tamminga, M.D.

     
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  8. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Biomarkers more reliable than subjectively assessed symptoms.

    Surprise! :woot:

    Not. :meh:
     
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  9. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    I have mixed feelings about this paper. I really like the idea behind the approach - of cutting across the traditional diagnostic boundaries and looking for other, better ways of differentiating people with psychiatric disorders. And its an impressive sample, of more than 700 patients - wow!

    But what I find odd is that they didn't justify why they chose the measures they did. And the measures were actually behavioural, not biological ones - even though they keep using the word "biological" everywhere. Its like they just gathered together a lot of tasks that people with psychosis have previously been found to perform poorly on.

    It turns out some people are impaired on one group of tasks/measures and not the other, and others show the opposite pattern (there's a third group, but they're just less impaired on everything, so they don't seem to count as a qualitatively different group)

    The MRI scans don't offer much at all. The two main groups have more widespread grey matter loss than the other (the one that is less impaired on everything), but the patterns for these two main groups do not appear to be qualitatively different.

    I didn't come away from the paper convinced that this method of discriminating amongst patients is better than the traditional method. What you'd need in order to be convincing here is some sort of theoretical framework which was consistent with the patterns, or some evidence that they're more useful in some practical way - like predicting responsiveness to treatment or prognosis or something.

    However, it's definitely interesting data, and a step in the right direction.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
    jimells, barbc56, Simon and 3 others like this.

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