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ME/CFS and Beating the Clock
For Jody Smith, the ticking of a clock was enough at one time to chase her back to her bed. But with the passage of time, she has been able to reclaim her living room ...
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BBC program - The Body Clock

Discussion in 'Sleep' started by Plum, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. Plum

    Plum Senior Member

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    Firestormm likes this.
  2. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    I watched 20 minutes and may well return. Quite interesting. There have been some studies I think using melatonin as a drug on CFS with encouraging results - again from memory - and I think they were small size studies.

    But I don't think anyone has looked at the levels of melatonin in CFS patients or at the effect of maintaining light during the day, might have on patients e.g. to encourage a better nights sleep and less 'napping' during the day.

    I must admit that I try to keep as much daylight in my flat as I can but it's filtered through nets and I can't always tolerate that amount of light.

    But some have experimented with the blue light sources - some friends - and those light-box things, but I never have. I think it's all about finding a balance that feels right for the individual and experimenting at different times.

    I mean when at my worst it is very depressing - not to mention that it must play havoc with the body-clock - to be in bed so much and behind closed curtains in a darkened room. But as you know, we don't have a lot of choice in those circumstances.

    p.s. this was the first opportunity I have had to test my new TV/Monitor that I bought after Xmas in HD. I'd saved for some time to feel able to afford it. Picture was excellent I am pleased to say. So thanks for that as well :)
  3. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    I can't play this video. The site says UK only. Is there a way around this?
  4. roonie

    roonie

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    i am in Canada and also cannot watch this .......eh. lol
  5. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I found several studies in the ME Research UK database. Some reported no abnormalities (but as we know, there are fundamental problems with subject selection in ME research). This one is quite interesting.
  6. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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  7. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    I am a lark I reckon and always have been despite ME. I still rise early and prefer/or am best able to function first thing in the morning - I just can't function as well or for as long as I used to. But I would be surprised if, had they collected my spit like Sir Terry Wogan's throughout the day, if it didn't show me as a lark rather than an Owl.

    Lark's are, well, timed to be awake earlier and tend to feel sleepier earlier at night and Owls the opposite.
  8. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I was amazed to hear that the 'body clock' is an actual physical structure and when its removed from the body continues to 'tic'.

    Not a lot we didn't know but interesting that they did TW's saliva sampling every half hour - now try getting that on the NHS!!:)

    Oh and did you notice they skipped pretty quickly over the fact that shift workers (night) have more health problems than the rest of the population, I remember this fact and you can shave a few years off life expectancy as well, from my psychology degree 30 odd yrs ago, so its been known for a long time. But not in the best interest of consumerism to make too much of it. ba%&rds..........
    Firestormm likes this.
  9. roonie

    roonie

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  10. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I use to work night shifts because I actually preferred them. Shift work is essential in some fields of work, such as the health service. I do realise now that it is harmful to health, so I reckon my shift-work bonuses were well-earned, even though there was so little work on some of the night shifts that people actually slept for much of them, or went out partying! :lol:
  11. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    I was terrible really. I thought night-shifts would work with my ME and insomnia better than days. I was in the 'I don't care but will just push on through' mode at the time and opted to take night-shifts in the supermarket. The only benefit was no customers but they really do expect a lot from the staff and I couldn't keep up either mentally or physically. But it played havoc with my body clock too. I was certainly awake enough to do the shift but I couldn't then adjust to sleeping during the day.
  12. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    @MeSci
    I agree about services such as the NHS - absolutely essential, and things like security etc, but you know where its not essential, and I do have a problem with 24hr consumerism, night shifts should be reduced, for the good of the health of these people.

    I too have done night shifts - I remember putting my head on the desk and feeling so sh........ty, (2-5am is a killer) also curled up one night on the little 2 seater sofa we had in the office, the cleaner used to come in at 6am so I had to be careful, she was lovely but a real grass:) Fun bit was between 10pm and 2/3am when the young mothers would come back in and try to sneak their boyfriends in, but that's another story..............
    It used to take me 2 days to feel normal. I only did it whilst I was doing a degree so not long term, thankfully. After that I used to see night duty jobs advertised - good money but I'd learnt my lesson, my body told me NO.
  13. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I did that! :D (Wasn't a mother though) At the previous place I didn't need to - I had boyfriends who were also my colleagues! :D:D
  14. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I didn't have ME when I did my night shifts. Sleeping during the day was hellish though - I lived in London. SOOOO noisy.
  15. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    So you were a naughty girl as well tut tut:D
    hey were funny though trying to distract me whilst the botfriend would be sliding along the floor, but the camera got them every time, both outside and in!!!
  16. redrachel76

    redrachel76 Senior Member

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    The program appeared on youtube
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  17. Hell...Hath...No...Fury..

    Hell...Hath...No...Fury.. Senior Member

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    I think i'm the opposite. I think it was daytime work that contributed to my health problems. Having to get up at 5.30am to 7.30am for work when my sleep has always been naturally reversed is what tipped me over the edge i think. Just because i had to get up didn't mean i could change my natural sleep pattern to suit so it meant i had to live and work on just a couple of hours sleep a night. I deeply regret not doing nightshift work before i got ill now as it would have been the same as working daytime for normal folks.
    MeSci likes this.
  18. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Yes, I have always had trouble with really early starts, so when on day shifts I used to select the latest start possible. I needed to do a range of things before leaving for work like make and eat breakfast, often do a packed lunch, feed the cats, clean the litter tray, not to mention washing, cleaning teeth, getting dressed, etc. So I couldn't just leap out of bed and dash out to catch a bus/train/get in the car.

    I'm sure a lot of people on very early starts are damaging their health due to insufficient sleep.
  19. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    I was a night owl, used to stay up even when working, I remember the first episodes of Prison Break, I used to stay up for that - I was able to work flexi time. I used to get my clothes out the night before and shower and wash my hair.
    In the morning I'd go back to sleep after hubby went off at 7.30am, wake up at 9am, jump out of bed, downstairs, soak oats in milk and make a tea, let dog out, back upstairs, quick wash and dress, downstairs, eat oats standing up and finish tea. Let dog back in. leave at 9.20 and arrive at work at 10am, bright and breezy had nothing on me, always a skip in my step, if I'd slept well. I used to stay until 6.30/7pm to make up hours and avoid the traffic.

    I loved my job and colleagues. but allowing me that freedom of not having to get up at 7am meant it also helped me to avoid the fact that I wasn't really well for a few years. Ignore your body clock at your peril.

    Being sick means your illness over-rules your body clock to a degree but the basics are still there and I still feel better if I stay in bed until say 10am, especially if I've stayed up a bit later the evening before. Going to bed at 10.30pm sucks but its what I have to do now.
  20. Hell...Hath...No...Fury..

    Hell...Hath...No...Fury.. Senior Member

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    I don't even try to correct my body clock now. Who was i doing it for? It was only a problem when i had a life that required getting up in the mornings, other than that i'm perfectly happy with it. Its a shame people don't have the liberty to live according their natural clocks, there may be less health problems as a result.
    During daytime hours my brain isn't on top form (even before ill) but from midnight until 3-4am my mind is crisp and alert and alive (unless in a brain fog period) and it would be a complete waste, to waste that.
    Little Bluestem and MeSci like this.

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