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B12/methylation research bibliography?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by switters, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. switters

    switters

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    I recently discovered this forum, and I'm so grateful for the depth of investigation happening here. I'm a clinician and I regularly screen for B12 deficiency using serum B12, urinary MMA and homocysteine (as well as a CBC). Not surprisingly, I frequently discover deficiencies. Until recently I've been using the protocol described in Could it Be B12, with only limited success. After reading these threads, I'm beginning to understand why.

    I have a quick question: has anyone put together a bibliography of research studies that were reviewed to create the protocol described here? I'd love to read the original studies myself.

    Thanks again for making this information available to clinicians and patients.
  2. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, switters.

    Welcome to Phoenix Rising!

    Note that there are two protocols under discussion here. One is the Simplified Treatment Approach, which I have suggested. It is based on the full Yasko treatment program, and the theoretical underpinning for its use in ME/CFS is discussed in poster papers I have presented at the IACFS/ME.

    You can find my documents in the General Wiki section of these forums. It is accessible at the bottom of the "Forum" page. There are references cited in the poster papers I presented in 2004, 2007 and 2009. You might also be interested in viewing the video or scanning the PDF slides from a seminar I presented in Sweden this past October 1. They can be found here:

    http://iaomt.media.fnf.nu/2/skovde_2011_me_kroniskt_trotthetssyndrom/$%7Bweburl%7D

    There are not many references cited there, but it is the most comprehensive description of the GD-MCB hypothesis at that time. Since then, I have made one change to the hypothesis to account for peroxynitrite reactions with 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate, as posted elsewhere on these forums. This is a work in progress, so I do not have a completely referenced manuscript that is current, but I think you will be able to find most of the references that support the hypothesis in papers in the General Wiki section.

    The other protocol is the one proposed by Freddd on these forums. He has also participated in the WrongDiagnosis board, where one of the authors of the book you mentioned used to post, also. Freddd's protocol is applicable to a broad range of B12-related issues. I don't know if he has documented it with references. As I understand it, he developed it primarily out of his own experience and by the experiences of others.

    There are some differences between these two protocols, and we are trying to learn more about how to determine which of these, or other methylation-type protocols would be best for a given individual. There are several other protocols in this category that are currently in use by various clinicians.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  3. switters

    switters

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    Thank you, Rich. I've seen both protocols and there appear to be significant differences. I've read some of the discussion about those differences as well. I will probably end up trying both protocols with my patients, depending on their presentation. (Incidentally, I noticed you did the hB12 study with Dr. Neil Nathan, who happens to be my physician!)

    I'll check out the Wiki as well as your Sweden presentations. Thanks for making those available.
  4. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Switters,

    If you search the former wrongdiagnosis site, the B12 DEFICIENCY IS HARD TO DIAGNOSE THREAD (2 million+ reads last I looked) there are probably a couple of hundred articles quoted and listed. Set your page size to 40 posts and you could scan through the entire thread in a couple of hours and extract all the references. This is on my to-do list but not at the moment. The Hidden B12 thread here also has quite a few references listed if scanned in the same way.

    MY problem was that I was terribly ill for years and I was in a hurry so I didn't document things the way I should have. I'm developing a symptoms quesionaire that can spot the symptoms that point at paradoxical folate deficiency and induced folate deficiency (will be posted here and developed with the aid of those sufferring such) CNS adb12 deficiency, CNS mb12 deficiency, body adb12 deficiency and body mb12 deficiency. I had started on development as a web app when I had a severe setback from a glutathione precursor trial. My current intention is to develop it as an app that will run on Android based tablets etc to begin with. The blood tests work very poorly at best and are no predictive of who will benefit or how much on the actice b12 protocol. I debuugged it just like a computer program, woring through each roadblock.

    Consider that perhaps 20% of your patients have paradoxical folate deficiency.

    I've worked in the software and consulting end of the group health field since 1982. My first Android app, already working in php on a PC and being modified for phens and tablets, is a medication withdrawal program that thousands have used in the form of a printout from the PC app. It already works for opioids of all varieties, benzos, SSRIs, anti seizure, anti-psychotics, barbiturates and basically anything I can tenter the suitable dose information on. Also already working in php on a PC is a serum level simulator for time release opioids (MSContin, Oxycontin, Avinza, Opana, etc) and IR meds and any med I can get suitable information for. It takes into account liver and kidney problems, gut transit time, the person's own serum halflife which can be derived by recording how the meds affect them and so on.

    If any of this might be of interest to you private message me and we can speak more directly.
  5. switters

    switters

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    Thank you, Fredd. I will check out the thread on the wrongdiagnosis site. I appreciate all of the hard work you've done on this.
  6. Rosebud Dairy

    Rosebud Dairy Senior Member

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  7. Rosebud Dairy

    Rosebud Dairy Senior Member

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    Ms. Escott-Cooper's contact information is available within her presentation, and I am told by my dietician contact that she has a very strong professional and personal interest in MTHFR. My contact saw Ms. Escott-Cooper's presentation at a national-level dietetics meeting (that one? I am not sure) several years ago, and that was what began my own MTHFR interest.
  8. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Switters,

    I would like to supply several cautions about methylb12/adenosylb12 specifically and may apply to hycbl as well.

    Methylb12 does neutralize Botox for about 24 hours per effective sublingual dose.

    Methylb12, and possibly hycbl and possibly adb12, can cause an occult tetanus by neutralizing the neurotoxin making it look like a minor ordinary infection and thereby difficult to diagnose.

    Methylb12, adenosylb12, Metafolin and a few others all can be the last in key factor when healing starts up and potassium can drop to symptomatic levels in 2-3 days or more. This is VERY widespread and appears to confirm cell formation startup. Some people have symptoms with potassium serum levels as high as 4.2 or 4.3.

    Folic acid, folinic acid, even vegetable food source folate, glutathione, NAC including Cerefolin-NAC can cause induced folate deficiencies from mild to extremely severe in from hours to weeks with increased b12 deficiencies in the weeks that follow.

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