A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry presents the first in a series of articles on the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London ...
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b cell depletion therapy

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by heapsreal, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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  2. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    quick snap shot of the article.

    Herpesviruses -- One of the more intriguing connections involves herpesviruses. Herpesviruses infect B-cells and replicate in great numbers during B cell transformation. Killing B-cells before they get transformed or activated could reduce or even cause a herpesvirus infection to die out as the B-cells they have infected die over time.

    Rituximab has been studied in EBV related diseases and two studies underway appear to be focusing on its effects on herpesviruses.

    The NIAID awarded Marcia Blackman at the Trudeau Institute $235,000 to examine B-cell depleting antibodies and herpesviruses in mice with an eye towards stopping the development of B-cell lymphomas in transplant patients. The broad research community has yet to embrace the importance of herpesviruses in ME/CFS but there is no doubt as to their virulence in other areas. The immunosuppression organ transplant patients require increases their risk of EBV associated B-cell lymphoma.

    Dr. Blackmans goal is to determine whether a b-cell depleting antibody can lower the latent load or even to purge latency from the host; ie to completely cleanse the mices system of herpesvirus infected cells. Dr. Ann Arvin at Stanford also has a grant to study Protective Immunity against herpesviruses that may appears to involve Rituximab as well. http://projectreporter.nih.gov/proje...0&icde=5938112

    XMRV? - the recent announcement from Spain that XMRV has been found in B-cells suggests that, if that finding is validated, Rituximab's effectiveness in some people could be due to reducing XMRV loads. If XMRV works out this could, in fact, be a more viable explanation than herpesviruses because the positive XMRV study results suggest XMRV may be more prevalent in the ME/CFS population than herpesviruses.
     
  3. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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  4. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    I think this treatment deserves more attention that it has got so far. I made a thread about it here (it got merged with another thread). But I am guessing those trials are the same as these, which have been known for while (correct me if I am wrong). They aren't particularly large (30 and 10 patients).
     
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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  6. redo

    redo Senior Member

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  7. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I think they might mind. I'm willing to wait.
     
  8. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    I can't say it matters if the submitter feels one shouldn't ask which journal which the new and exiting article is going to be published in. It's not impolite to ask such a question, in fact it's quite normal.

    I have written to them before, several times. And they are both kind and quick to reply. It's just that I have written so much, I feel it's wrong if I contact them again. But, I am sure they would be perfectly fine with it if someone else would ask such a simple question. No problem at all, and I think the reply would come in just days (like they always do).
     
  9. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    I thought I should shoot in, I wasn't specifically writing to you SL. I was writing to anyone who's curious, and reading this thread.
     
  10. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    i was under the impression that this study was coming out very soon.
    it looks like a lot more attractive option then arv's and i wonder when WPI said awhile ago that arv's arent what they are looking at and everyone thought ampligen, im thinking its b cell depletion therapy.

    cheers!!!
     
  11. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    One of the studies, probably more than one and has already been discussed. Was the problem of getting very good results while taking the Rituximab, but as soon as you stop treatment the illness returns in a poor fashion. That seemed to be the question to me was: Why did the disease return when the treatment was stopped?
     
  12. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    Hey Bud - I believe the study was sttarting very soon, but the blasted study was goingto last almost 2 years!! WTHIUWT!!
     
  13. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    Also i think they are keeping people on ritux longer in the newest study to see if benefits are longer lasting. I suppose with all current treatments for cfs, when treatments are stopped illness/symptoms returns including ampligen, av's and arv's etc. cfs/me is going to be an illness where treatment is going to be ongoing, i wish it wasnt, although there have been a few reports of people on valcyte who have recovered and not relpased although recovery is not 100% in most cases.

    Maybe need an infusion with ritux/ampligen/valcyte/famvir/azt/immunovir/ etc etc and then a liver/kidney transplant, lol.
     

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