Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Autism is not (just) a disease of the brain

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Marco, Jun 9, 2016.

  1. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    Near Cognac, France
    An intriguing possibility that some of the problems associated with ASD are due to hyper sensitive peripheral nerves :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...ng-caused-nerve-problems-legs-arms-hands.html
     
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  2. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Would this still be neurological or is it a matter of semantics?

    Wasn't there a similar study that found the same results in FM patients?
     
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  3. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    Well if it's affecting nerves/neurons whether peripherally or centrally then by definition it's neurological. Whether or not ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder is another issue.

    It isn't clear if they consider these peripheral sensory problems to be enough to explain ASD. If present from birth it's certainly plausible that these 'sensory gating' issues could skew the development of the brain. On the other hand the same problem may also affect neurons in the brain and hence neurodevelopment - semantics again. Or of course they could be seperate and not directly related issues (perhaps downstream of something)?

    You're right about FM. There have been several independent studies that have found peripheral neuropathy in a high proportion of FM patients although the researchers have been cagey about whether they consider peripheral neuropathy to be part of the pathophysiology of FM or just that a lot of folks with PN get 'misdiagnosed' with FM. If it is part of the pathophysiology though it suggests that 'central sensitisation' in FM may be sustained by ongoing peripheral stimulus rather than a central pain disorder in the absence of any persisting physical problem.

    Cort Johnson had a few blogs on this : http://www.healthrising.org/blog/20...ain-research-an-fm-and-pain-researcher-talks/
     
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  4. Battery Muncher

    Battery Muncher Senior Member

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    Always interesting to note the many overlaps between autism and (certain) ME/CFS behaviours
     
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