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auditory processing disorder

Discussion in 'Neurological/Neuro-sensory' started by Gavman, Dec 25, 2011.

  1. Gavman

    Gavman Senior Member

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    I saw a kinesiologist who picked up a learning difficulty that ive had for some time. I've always struggled with deciphering noises in noisy environments. Going to a plaza or when other people are talking, i can't think. So i have just had to go with the flow. But it burns me out something bad. Do many other people have this with CFS? And does anyone know any good information on the subject?

    Cheers,
    Gavin
     
  2. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Very much part of ME for me Gavin when at worst - sensory overload and unable to decipher sounds around (all quite painful too) After a few years of attention to general health (ME supplements etc) I'm only left with location of sound problems only and very loud noise painful (but always was). I hope another member can aid you with best treatments.
     
  3. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I've been like that prior to getting glandular fever - eg: I could not chat in noisy pubs, etc. I'm not sure if there's any recognised disorder related to this. Anyone else know? For me, it could be partially related to listening to rather too much loud music as a teen!

    Also - from what I've seen, 'kinesiology' really is nonsense. Isn't it about testing muscle weakness on proximity to things? I'd encourage you to look carefully at the evidence before you follow on advice based on this sort of testing. Good luck.
     
  4. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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  5. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Sensory Processing Disorder

    This may be connected, and perhaps worth checking out. I seem to have it in a significant way:

    Sensory Processing Disorder

    Wayne
     
  6. Gavman

    Gavman Senior Member

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    My kinesiologist has picked up and helped me deal with more than most practitioners i've seen. The practitioner is much more useful than the therapy. Its interesting to get such outlooks here though when the mainstream road to fixing CFS is pacing, cbt and graded exercise.

    So far the only treatment option i've been able to find on this kind of thing is where you put on a headset, listen to mozart and do brain training exercises every so often while the music is playing.
     
  7. Calathea

    Calathea Darkness therapy

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    Yes, it's a recognised neurological problem, although there are still plenty of doctors who haven't heard of it. Being unable to decipher speech if there's background noise is only one part of it, there's a multitude of symptoms. It has nothing to do with physical deafness, which isn't to say that the two can't co-exist. It's widely thought that it usually exists in people with dyslexia, and also in people on the autism spectrum. As with both of these, it affects adults as well as children, but for some strange reason is often talked about as if it only affected children. It is likely that it runs in families. The only hospital I know of in the UK which routinely screens for APD is the children's hospital Great Ormond Street in London, although this may have changed by now.

    If I were a child today, I'd probably have had my APD picked up at an early age. This is roughly what happened with me. I don't remember much of my childhood, I'm going on what my parents have told me. It seems that I have APD which has been exacerbated by the ME.

    First year - repeated hearing tests as I kept on ignoring sounds but would respond to changes in light.

    Probably from when I first learned to speak - rapid speech which has always been normal for me. I can't hear that I'm doing it, I hear myself speaking at the same speed as everyone else. Apparently there are gaps between words and I can't hear them.

    Age 5 - would come home from school with my hands over my ears, complaining that I couldn't bear the noise.

    Up to the age of 19 - keen musician, no problems learning languages, no problems with reading. (High intelligence will have probably compensated for many of the common symptoms.)

    Age 19 - first developed ME. Spent the first year with flu-like symptoms being most noticeable, sleeping a huge amount. When I made it to university before I fell ill, had no problems whatsoever with understanding hour-long lectures and wrote huge amounts of notes while listening to them.

    Age 20 - suddenly lost the ability to note-take in lectures. I couldn't listen and write, and after a few minutes of all this dense spoken information I couldn't understand speech. I would come out of the lecture exhausted and unable to remember even the basic subject.

    Gradually over the next few years - more and more problems with comprehending speech, including being distracted by any background noise (I've never owned a TV for this reason), being unable to gauge how loud I should speak and usually ending up speaking far too loud, going into rapid sensory overload due to sound, increasing difficulties with music (pretty much stopped playing/singing by now), being unable to follow instructions, being unable to remember even a basic phone call from a few minutes later, being unable to do something as basic as dressing while someone is talking, increasing difficulty following TV or film, constantly asking people to repeat what they've said or to tell me what's just been said on TV, having to get them to rephrase things repeatedly until I can understand, extreme difficulty in using the phone if there is any distortion (damn it, will people please get the message that I don't want them to call me on my mobile?!), being unable to follow conversation if there is more than one other person present, needing to see information if I am to have any chance at remembering it, inability to use telephone trees, inability to comprehend someone with a speech impediment or certain accents, sometimes inability to comprehend speech at all. Also hyperacusis, which has largely been successfully treated by white noise therapy, and was likely triggered by getting to the stage of being housebound and being used to living in silence.

    I've been incorrectly assessed as having physical hearing problems due to not being able to concentrate in a hearing test, either because of the noise outside the room (which I was assured qualified as "silent", by which they mean "soundproofed to a certain level" rather than actually silent) or because the audiologist kept on talking between beeps and it distracted me so much I couldn't tell what happened next.

    I have also developed visual processing problems since acquiring ME. My guess is that it's not that APD causes reading difficulties literally, as so many people claim, but that visual and auditory processing problems are extremely likely to co-exist. The memory issues are far, far stronger with my auditory processing than with my visual processing.
     
  8. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Hi, my eldest son was diagnosed with APD at age 15 and Dyslexia. He had a lot of problems with noise being very painful as a child and also it became clear as he got older that his memory was terrible - especially for spoken instructions. He cannot processs a long list of spoken instructions but has to be given them one a a time, he also has problems with organisation, although he never had any problems with speech or learning to read and write. He does becvome easily overwhelmed with too much stimulus and has adopted a laid nback approach which i know means he isnt coping but nobody else would notice.
    I think APD is only just being more recognised now - we had to pay for him to have testing privately and even then his school refused to give homework on written sheets ( he just forgets if hes told and even worse atr the end of a noisy lesson with bells ringing etc) I do think this is different to the sensory gating deficit discussed in another thread, which io seem to have problems with as part of my M.E.

    I have used a kineseologist in the past and found them VERY useful, at least for diagnosing etc.
    Take care, Justy.
     
  9. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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    I'm sure you're right justy. I don't have any experience with APD.

    But it would be interesting to know if Gavin can identify with the statements from the questionnaire detailed on page 4 of this paper :

    http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2010/06/04/schbul.sbq054.full.pdf

    Not that I'm suggesting schizophrenia as 'normal' people also experience these things on a spectrum of severity. I can recognise many of these issues myself since ME onset and some from before ME.
     
  10. Gavman

    Gavman Senior Member

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    Hmm Marco. No I dont think many. Visually i dont pay attention much. Im more a feelings kind of person. Loud noise and bright lights me. I have a slow processor in my head, when too many people are talking at once, i just turn to the loudest and nod and dont say much. Or when in a 1-1 that turns to a 2-1, I stop listening and ignore both people. I tend to have a very hard time following auditory instructions. If someone talks for 5 minutes and asks me to repeat, i'll give them like 5-10 main words and wing everything else. I've always been like that - it could of course be psychological, due to neglect but my mother had the same issues.
     
  11. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    Sensory Processing Disorders

    Hi Calathea,

    Thanks much for your comprehensive, interesting, and informative post. I feel I also deal with some form of hyperacusis, with noises of all kinds being painful and overwhelming. At times, even the most soothing, softest (and favorite) music can feel like a grating on my nerves.

    Visually, I simply cannot concentrate on anything of an organizational nature if I see movement of any kind in my peripheral vision. Interestingly, I feel I have a better than average capacity to navigate traffic, even with all the peripheral vision stimuli (though my stamina forces me to limit myself at certain times).

    Anyway, I think you're right that a lot of these different kinds of sensory problems co-exist. It also seems they can either be a precursor for developing ME, or can be greatly exaggerated by its onset. Thanks again for your post.

    Regards, Wayne
     
  12. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Gavin,

    I used to have that 9 years ago and have met others with it. It healed along with the rest of the CFS/FMS symptoms. Someone I met this summer had substantial improvment with the first few methylb12 tablets she tried.
     
  13. PhoenixDown

    PhoenixDown Senior Member

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    Yeah I have something like this, I don't think I was born with it, it gradually got worse starting around the time I first noticed the fatigue (my overall symptoms were gradual onset, no sudden virus-like illness). It's quite bad now, because it's not just a processing error, some non-loud sounds can easily cause me pain and cause stress.

    I also "feel" sounds now, it's like a mixing of senses, like my auditory and tactile senses are merged.

    Not much point in telling doctors/family as they have decided without evidence that I'm crazy and just need to "think positive", a process which they refuse to even describe.
     
  14. Calathea

    Calathea Darkness therapy

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    When you say that it's not a processing problem when you suffer pain and distress from non-loud sounds, do you mean that it's physically painful? As far as I am aware, there are only two parts to hearing: the physical part located in the ear, and the neurological part located in the brain. APD can cause problems with reacting to any type of sound, not necessarily loud sound. I have no idea how many types of APD there are or how they connect to the various conditions they commonly occur with (ME, dyslexia, autism spectrum disorders for instance), but with anything as complex as hearing, I'd expect a variety of manifestations for the problems involved. And APD has only recently been recognised at all, it's still very much in its infancy.

    Feeling sounds - any chance you're feeling the vibrations? Is it any particular type of sounds? Or some sort of synaesthesia, perhaps?
     
  15. PhoenixDown

    PhoenixDown Senior Member

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    I worded that poorly. I meant it's not just a practical problem with concentrating in the presence of noise but there's also the pain element to it as well. Yeah you're right in that it's all a brain error and not the ear which is at fault, drawing an analogy to computers: My "microphone" is working fine but whatever processes the sound is malfunctioning. It's a loose analogy because we don't really know how the brain works, it could be that the "sound processor" is working but something further down the line is malfunctioning, but yeah, I don't think it's anything to do with the ear.
     

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