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Attentional and interpretive bias towards illness-related information in chronic fatigue syndrome

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by halcyon, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    Attentional and interpretive bias towards illness-related information in chronic fatigue syndrome: A systematic review.
    Hughes A1, Hirsch C1, Chalder T2, Moss-Morris R1.
    Author information
    • 1Psychology Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK.
    • 2Department of Psychological Medicine, Weston Education Centre, King's College London, UK.
    Abstract
    PURPOSE:

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by severe and debilitating fatigue. Studies based on self-report measures suggest negative illness representations, related symptom interpretations, and heightened symptom focusing are maintaining factors of fatigue. This study reviews studies which have investigated these cognitive biases using experimental methods, to (1) review the evidence for information processing biases in CFS; (2) determine the nature of these biases, that is the stages cognitive biases occur and for what type of stimuli; and (3) provide directions for future methodologies in this area.

    METHODS:
    Studies were included that measured attention and interpretation bias towards negative and illness-related information in people with CFS and in a comparison group of healthy controls. PubMed, Ovid, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and EThOS were searched until December 2014.

    RESULTS:
    The evidence for cognitive biases was dependent on the methodology employed as well as the type and duration of the stimuli presented. Modified Stroop studies found weak evidence of an attentional bias in CFS populations, whereas visual-probe studies consistently found an attentional bias in CFS groups for health-threatening information presented for 500 ms or longer. Interpretative bias studies which required elaborative processing, as opposed to a spontaneous response, found an illness-related interpretive bias in the CFS group compared to controls.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Some people with CFS have biases in the way they attend to and interpret somatic information. Such cognitive processing biases may maintain illness beliefs and symptoms in people with CFS. This review highlights methodological issues in experimental design and makes recommendations to aid future research to forge a consistent approach in cognitive processing research. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Studies based on self-report measures suggest negative illness representations, related symptom interpretations, and heightened symptom focusing contribute to the maintenance of chronic fatigue. Experimental studies in other clinical populations, such as patients with anxiety, depression, and chronic pain, have identified illness-specific biases in how information is implicitly attended to and interpreted, which has a causal role in these conditions. What does this study add? This is the first review of implicit cognitive processes in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Sustained attention and negative interpretations of somatic information may reinforce negative illness beliefs. Cognitive processes have a role to play in the cognitive behavioural model of CFS.
     
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  2. tinacarroll27

    tinacarroll27 Senior Member

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    When I saw the institution and then I saw the name "Chalder" I thought here we go again!!!!! I am finding this a bit stale now and predictable! It would be funny if they hadn't caused so much suffering and still manage to have control over the way the government and the press view this illness.
     
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  3. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    Sigh. :rolleyes:
     
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  4. worldbackwards

    worldbackwards A unique snowflake

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    Earth
    The irony is rather of the sledgehammer variety.
     
  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    MEMum and Valentijn like this.
  6. Chrisb

    Chrisb Senior Member

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    Some people have biases therefore all people may have illness beliefs maintained by such biases.

    An interesting form of syllogistic reasoning.
     
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  7. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    TL;DR
    Here at Kings College we needed to increase our published paper count. We reviewed a bunch of useless psych papers that were likely to support our own beliefs and therefore can now report a number of completely unprovable 'results'.

    P.S. No, there aren't any objective results used; subjective results always work out best for us!

    Am I close???
     
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  8. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    Translation: buuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuhhhhhhhhhhh...
     
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  9. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    On the plus side, they're starting to sound quite insane now. There's a sort of demented, euphoric mania about the tone of this. I have visions of them, gathered in the BPS bunker while the forces of reason converge on them, churning out paper for all they're worth and cackling to themselves. I think they know their goose is cooked and they're totally losing the plot.
     
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  10. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
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  11. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    I think they earn money selling CBT/GET training to therapists, so it doesn't matter if it's ridiculous nonsense as long as gullible therapists buy it, which in turn might also be aware that it's ridiculous nonsense but don't care if it increases their earning potential thanks to the politics of the NHS which might also be aware that it's ridiculous nonsense but doesn't care because they have to be seen as doing something and CBT/GET is the infalsifiable, cheap option. Especially if it's so hated by patients because that reduces service usage which means an even greater reduction of costs.

    The status quo is completely acceptable to these parties, so why change anything?

    Some random cynical thoughts which may or may not have any relation to reality.
     
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  12. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    No. (Obviously @halcyon didn't say this - I can't copy it the correct way.)

    The very first sentence is wrong. They got it wrong out of the starting gate. How absurd is that??

    This is like saying Winter is characterized by geese flying south. Sure, geese do fly south in the Winter, but it is so much more than this.

    Now, everyone knows this. Everyone. So why does this gang psychs act like they don't?
     
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  13. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    (I modified the conclusion for greater accuracy) "Some people with degrees in psychiatry have biases in the way they attend to and interpret information. Such cognitive processing biases may maintain beliefs about people with ME. "
     
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  14. Comet

    Comet I'm Not Imaginary

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    Of course one could also conclude that the reason we have 'heightened symptom focusing' is because we are desperately trying to get someone to help and believe us. But almost no one will. And the ones who pretend to be helping completely distort the truth. Leaving us suffering for decades. :jaw-drop: But, nah, that's just crazy talk! :aghhh:
     
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  15. leela

    leela Slow But Hopeful

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    i wish i could "like" this 10,000 times! (that's my cognitive bias.)
     
  16. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

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    I agree. On the minus side, I think this is the most vile and abusive abstract I've ever read. Yes, over the last couple of years or so the UK psych papers seem to have entered some kind of 'reductio ad absurdam' phase. It's a reflection of the fact that they're losing the argument and real science is catching up with them, but that doesn't make it any easier for me to read. Just disgusting.
     
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  17. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    When I was failing to find the full text for this I found this from a phd dissertation that could be of interest:

    Attentional Bias and Physical Symptom Reporting

    2015

    Sarah Scott

     
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  18. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    I cried when I read the original thread post here, are we really moving forward with this illness or has no ground be gained in science yet at all? It's like the psychs are getting worst and not better with it. For many years they have been trying to discuse their views in a twisted kind of manner but this latest is so in our face of what they truely do think.

    I clicked this link as when I read the heading, I'd actually thought it was going to be a positive study on how psych CFS researchers and doctors are biased towards those who have ME/Cfs and often go about interpretive this illness wrong, how these researchers have attentional biases towards the wrong symptoms in ME/CFS. **sighs, i was too positive again.. reading what this was actually about then like slammed me**
     
  19. Mark

    Mark Former CEO

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    This is exactly what worried me when I read the abstract and called it abusive. It angered me for several reasons, but I'm acutely aware of how upsetting this content can be for many patients who are really struggling. To be described in such naked terms as being a burden on society, and to be taken to task for focusing on their symptoms....this is thinly veiled indeed and it gets hard to avoid comparisons with the worst episodes in human history when it gets this blatant. I used the word abusive after some consideration: that's exactly what this is. I do agree with Sarah about the positive side: this sort of thing is indicative of a movement that is falling apart, reduced to absurdity and ever more transparent in that absurdity and in its utter disrespect of sufferers. But I worry about the effect on vulnerable people who may come into contact with this kind of garbage.
     
  20. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Bob likes this.

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