Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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At what Oxygen levels is using Oxygen with APAP recommended?

Discussion in 'Sleep' started by Peyt, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    Does anyone know where I could find information on how low the oxygen levels need to be before one could ask for Prescribed Oxygen? (To be used with the CPAP/APAP)?

    Thanks so much,
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  2. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Oxygen would be added if a sleep study demonstrates that your CPAP/APAP is effectively treating your apneas and hypopneas and that your CO2 levels are in the normal range(if they are too high, then BiPAP would be titrated), but your oxygen levels remain low.If that were the case they would probably want to get some pictures of your lungs and do a pulmonary function test, too to make sure your lungs are OK.
     
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  3. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    So what is considered low oxygen during CPAP/APAP treatment?
     
  4. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Well, if you are adequately ventilating, that is moving air in and out and CO2 out, most would try to match your sleep saturation levels to your wake time saturation levels. But you have to measure it all to know why the sats are low. Under treatment of apnea and hypoventilation should never be treated with oxygen therapy. They require pressure changes and/or changing to BiPAP. If those things are properly treated and sats are still low, then your lungs are failing to transfer the oxygen in the air into your blood. That is when supplemental oxygen is required. Well, unless you have arrhythmias, they can trick the oximeter into giving low readings.
     
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  5. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Actually I do have faster than normal heart rate, but after doing an EKG they could not find anything significant with the heart, so my heart is been beating faster than normal for a long time. Usually around 103 - 104
     
  6. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    That's got to be uncomfortable. Is it worse when you are upright?
     
  7. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    I have never paid attention to that.. why would it be worst when upright ?
     
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  8. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Concord, NH
    I think if your Oximeter reading drops below 88%, I use oxygen with my CPAP. Just had an appt with Dr last week. He prescribed 1 LPM but my CFIDS specialist prescribes 4 LPM.

    My sleep specialist was concerned with that dosage when I told him, so spoke with my ME specialist about dropping it, he was fine 3 LPM. So with my appt last week told the sleep specialist that I went down to 3 LPM. He was still concerned long term there could be damage, not sure it has been studied extensivily, just some data suggest it could be harmful at to high a dosage.

    So he sent me home with an oximeter to monitor my sleep for 1 night. Done that, and awaiting results.

    http://www.copd-alert.com/OximetryPG.pdf This article seems to suggest 92%, not sure.

    GG
     
  9. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Well, when I am awake the oximeter reading is usually around 94 to 97. It's when I am sleeping that concerns me. My sleep study is from 2006 and I am looking at it now, it says : Min SaO2 : 90% which should be okay I think but that was back in 2006 so I might be due for another sleep study.
     
  10. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Orthostatic Intolerance is usually a part of ME/CFS. It is often highly treatable. Treating it can improve symptoms and quality of life. Here is a good explaination:

    http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/pdf/RoweOIsummary.pdf
     
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  11. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Do you have COPD?
     
  12. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Interesting,
    What type of Doctor would be able to diagnose and treat this?
     
  13. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    I know of some in California, if you are also in CA, PM me. Dysautonomia International lists regional support groups, some of which maintain lists of member recommended physicians. Try looking here:

    http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID=24

    The types of doctors who diagnose and treat the various orthostatic intolerances are cardiologists and neurologists, though the ones who do are few and far between, so you really need to find one who is highly recommended for it.
     
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