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Assessing current functioning as a measure of significant reduction in activity level (on ME & CFS)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Dolphin, Jul 21, 2016.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21641846.2016.1206176?journalCode=rftg20

    Assessing current functioning as a measure of significant reduction in activity level
    DOI: 10.1080/21641846.2016.1206176
    Taylor Thorpea, Stephanie McManimena, Kristen Gleasona, Jamie Stoothoffa, Julia L. Newtonb, Elin Bolle Strandc & Leonard A. Jasona*


    • Received: 9 May 2016
    • Accepted: 22 Jun 2016
    • Published online: 19 Jul 2016



    ABSTRACT

    Background
    :

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome have case definitions with varying criteria, but almost all criteria require an individual to have a substantial reduction in activity level.

    Unfortunately, a consensus has not been reached regarding what constitutes substantial reductions.

    One measure that has been used to measure substantial reduction is the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). [1]

    Purpose:

    The current study examined the relationship between the SF-36, a measure of current functioning, and a self-report measure of the percent reduction in hours spent on activities.

    Results:

    Findings indicated that select subscales of the SF-36 accurately measure significant reductions in functioning.

    Further, this measure significantly differentiates patients from controls.

    Conclusion:

    Determining what constitutes a significant reduction in activity is difficult because it is subjective to the individual.

    However, certain subscales of the SF-36 could provide a uniform way to accurately measure and define substantial reductions in functioning.

    KEYWORDS
     
    Woolie, mango, Simon and 5 others like this.
  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  4. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    One thing both of the last 2 tables show is that the CDC should never have used the role emotional scale of the SF-36 as a way to operationalise reduced impairment in the CFS definition i.e. in Reeves et al 2005.
     
    Simon, Snow Leopard, Kati and 4 others like this.
  6. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member

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    I didn't see it reflected here but a reduction in time spent is not the only thing:

    I might have reduced the amount of time I spend on say paperwork or housework but, as I am also functioning less effectively, I achieve less during the time I spend. So If I've cut the time spent by, lets say, 75 % I may only achieve 10% or 5% compared to previous functioning levels, rather than 25%

    Also what I do do may well be riddled with errors (and often is!).
     
    Justin30, mango, TiredSam and 12 others like this.
  7. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    The impairment in productivity clearly goes beyond a mere endurance problem. Not sure how many others have this but in addition to what @Invisible Woman said I have big problems with finishing projects. The connection to projects I start fades away a little more every day. I think it's a specific type of memory problem.
     
  8. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member

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    My latest PubMed Commons e-letter criticising the CDC's so-called empiric criteria (Reeves et al. 2005)

     
    mango, Simon, Webdog and 6 others like this.
  9. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Sth Australia
    Same here, I tend to think it can take me 10 times longer (depending on whatever Im doing) to do what I did before even when spending the same time on it. Its cause I keep screwing things up so do them wrong which causes more issues or forget parts Ive already done and keep redoing them.

    eg say Im trying to get a form done. I find I've misplaced the form and burn myself out just looking for it. I end up having to get help to find it another day.. I'll then may start it but then loose it again and then go and even forget I had the form so at a later date I apply for yet another form. Im going around and around in circles with different things.

    or I order something and then a few weeks later my order comes back to me telling me I did the order wrong, so I had to redo it (I've had incidences where my orders have come back to me a second time as I just went and screwed up another area on a form to what i did the first time I tried).

    Try to make meals but burn them so have to do all over again (thou usually I give up that happens as I dont have the energy to try again). im not very efficiently doing things even when I do them.
     

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