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Article: The Best XMRV Study Underway? Dr. Singh Talks!

Discussion in 'Phoenix Rising Articles' started by Phoenix Rising Team, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. oceanblue

    oceanblue Senior Member

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    Yes, it's quite amazing that there has been so little research on the pronounced sex ratio in this illness - someone coming across the illness for the first time might think it was one of the most striking aspects of this hard to fathom disease.

    As an alternative to the hysteria hypothesis, could it be down to the immune system? Women generate stronger immune responses than men (the vast majority of autoimmune diseases are much more common in women than men). I gather this difference is immune systems is true for mammals and I other animals too, as testosterone can suppress immune response. The immune system, and particualarly the immune system over-reacting, is often linked to ME/CFS - so if women have stronger immune reactions you might expect more women to get ME.

    As for gender differences, am I right in thinking that men are even more impressed by Dr Singh than women are?

    More seriously, it's frustrating that she's not giving much away about the results of her research; it's very professional of her and I think the right thing to do, but there is a hint there could be some incredibly important results coming out of her work.
  2. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    We must just be patient whilst Science unravels.
  3. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Very best of wishes to Dr Singh no detractors - keep going !.
  4. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

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    I wonder how what other kind of disorders have female prevalence? Its a fascinating question.

    As to other question of gender differences - there are several reasons to be impressed by our beaming researcher :D
  5. urbantravels

    urbantravels disjecta membra

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    Does somebody perhaps have a little researcher-crush? ;)

    I have read a fair amount about autoimmune diseases in the course of my wondering about what the hell ME/CFS really is. They tend to be much more prevalent in women. There is something a little more vulnerable about the female immune system, having to do with the need to be able to carry a child to term. I'll let the actual scientists around here explain that better - I'm really no scientist, just a general-purpose know-it-all :cool:

    ME/CFS may yet be considered an auto-immune disease - whether it is triggered by "Pathogen X," other pathogens, or other "insults" - environmental toxins and what-not, or a combination of the above.
  6. Impish

    Impish Senior Member

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  7. sensing progress

    sensing progress Senior Member

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    I know I do. First it was Dr. Klimas and Dr. Bateman, now Dr. Singh too. :D
  8. Loved the TWiV podcast, best one yet.



    Isn't that wired brain feeling common to both? If I was a little younger I'd probably have both diagnoses (too old by the time ADD/ADHD became "popular" enough to be diagnosed here in Hicksville, I just needed a good beating :Retro tongue: )

    I've heard some subsets of CFS patients using ADD/ADHD meds, Dexamphetamine, Ritalin etc - what is the rational there?
  9. SOC

    SOC Back to work (easy, part-time work)

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    Enid, I know exactly what you mean and I agree wholeheartedly.

    Nevertheless, my unruly mind is giving me visuals of Science coming apart at the seams, lol!
  10. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

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    They do work for some people..I don't how many...they are brain stimulants - I don't know much about them but I kind of think of them as supplying energy to the brain. I actually like to try one and see how its works out. I actually do pretty well on caffeine - can think better, libido even goes up a bit but then I get shakey and it gives me IBS symptoms.
  11. oceanblue

    oceanblue Senior Member

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    From what I've read, it's something that is only just coming into focus. I saw those figures on 1.3x more women getting thryroid cancer; for autoimmune it's even higher e.g. 2:1 for MS and up to 9:1 for some others such as Rheumtoid Arthritis (though a few autoimmune diseases are predominantly male).
  12. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    I think the general rule is that women get more endocrine and immune disorders, and men get more genetic ones. But either sex can get any of them.
  13. Tia

    Tia Senior Member

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  14. Tia

    Tia Senior Member

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    This is VERY interesting because I've inherited ME from my grandfather who was in the war. I knew al along this wasn't from rats as they clamed, but that it was from chemical warfare. I KNEW it!
  15. Impish

    Impish Senior Member

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    Ritalin is a super stimulant. It is also given to people with narcolepsy. My worry (no scientific backing to this just opinion) is that it would give people with CFS an artificial burst of energy which given that they are still sick would push them to do things their body can't handle and cause damage. I have ADHD (my sister has CFS) and take it.
  16. Krizani

    Krizani

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    Thanks for your input on using psychiatric drugs for many uses, some of which aren't exactly intuitive. I have been subject to trials of SSRIs, etc, in a search for pain relief among other things. None have worked and all have had horrible side effects and were a nightmare to discontinue.

    I had the interesting experience of leafing through the current formulary in my HMO doc's exam room the other day. I found several SSRIs and other psychiatric drugs under the "analgesic" heading which made my jaw drop. These things are not like aspirin or other pain meds by a long shot - they affect neurotransmitters in very profound, and often very catastrophic, ways. What a shock that was.

    On a final note, I just listened to the podcast and I was dumbfounded to hear one of the participants trot out seasickness as a perfect example of a cluster outbreak of illness. Coming up with this as some sort of analogy to the outbreak of CFS in, say, Tahoe was beyond insulting, and it was said in a manner that was in itself insulting. Sort of the ol' wink, wink, nudge, nudge with his colleagues in attendance. Everything was smooth sailing until actual patients entered consideration in the discussion.

    To compare CFS, a complex neuro-immune illness that I've personally had for 25+ years with a self-limiting experience that would require close personal contact with other sufferers beggars the imagination. What does he think we do, watch TV and go on the internet and send hard questions to the moderator to reinforce our delusions, since close personal contact with others becomes unsustainable for many of us?

    This comment and example revealed a profound bias on his part, so fundamental to the prevailing worldview among researchers. I guess we were supposed to feel reassured by the following assertions that seasickness is very real and even *gasp* life threatening after the sucker punch of that demeaning analogy in the midst of serious scientific discussion. Here, folks, is the elephant in the living room, and he's pretty rude.
  17. Wasbeer

    Wasbeer

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    Quite a shame you can't meet Dr. Metzger from REDlabs, Belgium. Then you'd have four crushes.

    (MDCS=Multiple Doctor Crush Syndrome, mostly seen by patients who don't have the energy to pursue an active lovelife, and who's contact with the other sexe is often limited to the cute doctors they meet irl or url)
  18. Bob

    Bob

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  19. Bob

    Bob

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  20. Daffodil

    Daffodil Senior Member

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    i have tried stimulants over the years but all they seemed to do was give me headaches. they didnt help my symptoms at all.

    -S

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