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Article on the Spanish XMRV studies

Discussion in 'Media, Interviews, Blogs, Talks, Events about XMRV' started by eric_s, Sep 25, 2010.

  1. eric_s

    eric_s Senior Member

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    Switzerland/Spain (Valencia)
    Hi all

    Here's a Spanish article on the studies done in Badalona (Cataluna, Spain) that were presented on the 1st International Workshop on XMRV.

    This is the link to the article

    And here's a translation done with Google

    It adds a little bit more background and some comments on those studies that we've already seen the abstracts of.
  2. Alexia

    Alexia Senior Member

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    It's really a very interesting report. I can understand Spanish well but the scientific terms make it difficult to follow everything.
    It's great to see that they are busy trying to understand how XMRV "attacks " the body and what exactly does to the system once there.
  3. eric_s

    eric_s Senior Member

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    Yes. I think once they know where to look for the virus, other than in the blood, it should be easier to detect. And it's interesting to see how EBV etc. fit into the picture. Also good to have XMRV presence confirmed in one more european country. And they plan to do a larger study, it says.
  4. George

    George waitin' fer rabbits

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    South Texas
    This was great. It helped me to understand the EBV study more clearly. If I'm reading it right then they used cultured EBV cells to grow XMRV, kinda like they used the LnCap cells from prostate cancer to culture at WPI. That would mean that EBV activates XMRV right? That EBV actually gives the virus a place to make happy little XMRV children who then go out and make more happy little XMRV children.

    So this would explain why the sudden onset. Most folks are exposed to EBV as children but may not develop "mono" until later in life or not at all. But if you have EBV then you have a place to replicate the virus, a good replication environment. Then later if you pick up EBV again in the form of mono or if you pick up a bug that activates mono then the XMRV explodes and it can take years for the body to rid itself of the XMRV but also to get the EBV under control again.

    That is soooo cool. Science makes me happy.
  5. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Many thanks for this article. It is good to see Science (dedicated Researchers) unravelling the behaviour and interactions of these complex Virals.Another step along the way. And hopefully for us.
  6. eric_s

    eric_s Senior Member

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    I don't really understand it. Maybe someone with more knowledge can explain. What i understand is that they looked for XMRV in B cells that were transformed by EBV. And they found it there, so they say that these cells might be a reservoir for XMRV. I don't see any evidence that they tried to culture XMRV in this experiment.

    But i find it interesting that there's some evidence that EBV might play a role. Because i've had it and it might well have been shortly before CFS started, because i had a rather bad infection then (but i can't know because i didn't take the test at this time only later and they could not say when the EBV infection occured). And EBV has always been discussed as a possible cause of CFS and now it feels a bit like the pieces are starting to fit together.
  7. julius

    julius Watchoo lookin' at?

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    Canada
    This is a bit off-topic, and probably not of interest to many people here....but I thought I'd post it anyways.

    This discussion on B-cells just gave me a huge eureka moment.

    I have long known that cannabis offers me significant relief from my symptoms. It's not the 'high' that does it (I actually hate the feeling of being high...too anxious). It's aftwerard, when the high has worn off that I feel the relief. Mosly I feel reduction in inflammation, and much less brain fog, plus a lot less fatigue to boot.

    I read a few studies of immune suppression by cannabis, and that made some sense to me (one of the main things I get from it is a major reduction in inflammation). But I never could fully understand how it applied to cfs. Now I think I have an idea how that might be working.

    Cannabinoids bind with G protein-coupled receptors (these are the same receptors for androgens, and XMRV). Specifically they bind with CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Now, check this out...
    "CB2 receptors are most commonly prevalent on B-cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes, but can also be found on polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells, T8 cells, and T4 cells. In the tonsils the CB2 receptors appear to be restricted to B-lymphocyte-enriched areas." (wikipedia)

    So, it seems possible to me that the cannabinoids are blocking entry to the B-cells (and possibly other potential reservoirs).

    Does this make any sense to any of you smarties out there?


    ETA; I just realised that there is a hole in my thinking. XMRV binds with XPR1 receptors, so the cannabinoids blocking CB2 wouldn't be stopping xmrv entering the cell. But would there be another way that the CB2 receptors could be involved?

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