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Article about NIH/ NCI and XMRV treatments

Discussion in 'XMRV Research and Replication Studies' started by dmarie4301, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. dmarie4301

    dmarie4301 Guest

    http://merutt.wordpress.com/2010/02...nstitute-forsker-pa-medisiner-for-xmrv-og-me/

    National Cancer Institute forsker p medisiner for XMRV og ME
    Arkivert under: Uncategorized Rutt @ 16:33
    Tags: cfs, me, merutt, myalgisk encefalopati, National Cancer Institute, rutt, thisisme, WPI, XMRV

    National Cancer Institute med Sandra K. Ruscetti Ph.D, Head, Retroviral Pathogenesis Section, skriver flgende p sine web-sider:

    Cancer and Neuroimmune Diseases Induced by the Human Retrovirus XMRV
    We are currently using knowledge and reagents obtained from working with mouse retroviruses to study the xenotropic MuLV-related human retrovirus XMRV, which was recently discovered through an association with prostate cancer. In collaboration with the laboratories of Judy Mikovits and Frank Ruscetti, we were able to use antibodies developed against the envelope protein of SFFV to detect infectious XMRV in the blood cells and plasma of patients suffering from the neuroimmune disease chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We were further able to develop a seroconversion assay using cells expressing the SFFV envelope protein to detect antibodies against the virus in the plasma of CFS patients. We now plan to apply our knowledge of the pathogenesis of mouse retroviruses that cause cancer and neurological disease in rodents to study the molecular basis for similar diseases associated with XMRV. We are in the process of developing rodent models for determining the biological effects of XMRV in vivo, which if successful will provide a small animal model for preclinical testing of potential anti-XMRV drugs. In addition, we are testing both in vitro and in vivo the biological effects of the envelope protein of XMRV, which like its related SFFV counterpart may be responsible for the pathogenicity of XMRV.

    Collaborators:

    Collaborators on this research are Dr. Frank Ruscetti, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, CCR, NCI; Dr. Larry Keefer, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, CCR, NCI; Dr. Judy Mikovits, Whittemore Peterson Institute; Drs. Candace Pert and Michael Ruff, RAPID Pharmaceuticals.
  2. mezombie

    mezombie Senior Member

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    Woo Hoo! :victory:

    Thanks for posting this, dmarie!
  3. Dr. Yes

    Dr. Yes Shame on You

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    On another thread, George had posted Ruscetti's NCI link:

    http://ccr.cancer.gov/Staff/staff.asp?profileid=5518

    I would REALLY like to know more about their research, especially about the antibody assay they have apparently developed. I am assuming this is the same serological assay that Dr. Mikovits was referring to? How specific is it for XMRV at this stage? (and how cross-reactive, incl. to HERV's?) Will a paper on this be published soon?

    They're really enjoying teasing us right now, aren't they? :Retro mad::rolleyes:
  4. George

    George Guest

    Other Hot Chicks in XMRV studies

    Ila Singh's Laboratory

    http://www.path.utah.edu/research/labs/singh



    [​IMG]
    Contact Info Coordinating Faculty: Ila Singh, M.D. Ph.D.
    Location: Emma Eccles Jones Medical Research Building
    Lab Website: http://www.path.utah.edu/labs/singh

    About Ila Singh's Laboratory

    Our research interests involve many aspects of retroviral replication. We study HIV-1, Moloney murine leukemia virus, and XMRV, a novel xenotropic murine-like retrovirus that has recently been implicated in human prostate cancer.
    Our studies with XMRV consist of elucidating the role of this newly discovered virus in human prostate cancer. XMRV is the first gammaretrovirus known to infect humans. While gammaretroviruses have well-characterized oncogenic effects in animals, they have not been shown to cause human cancers. Our experiments show that XMRV is indeed a gammaretrovirus with protein composition and particle ultrastructure highly similar to Moloney murine leukemia virus, another gammaretrovirus that we have studied for the last several years. We analyzed 334 consecutive prostate resection specimens using a quantitative PCR assay and immunohistochemistry with an anti-XMRV specific antiserum. We found the virus in 27% of prostate cancers. XMRV proteins are expressed primarily in malignant epithelial cells, suggesting that retroviral infection may be directly linked to tumorigenesis. We have shown that XMRV-infection is associated with prostate cancer, especially higher-grade cancers. We are currently investigating possible mechanisms of oncogenesis by XMRV in cultured cells, in human tumors and in a mouse model.


    So should we rename this thread "the hot babes of XMRV" and stick Russcetti's pic up????


    ummm, Russcetti, 'scetti, I'm hungry now! (wink and a wag)
  5. dmarie4301

    dmarie4301 Guest

    I dont appreciate my thread turned into a porno site, nor to suggest to rename it. I felt I finally beat eveyrone to the punch and posted some really great new news, and this is the response you guys can come up with? I may delete the article I posted. Or maybe just never post again. It IS a good thing women are spearheading this thing.......I will not complete this sentence.
  6. Andrew

    Andrew Senior Member

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    I appreciate your post, and I wish your original topic had developed more.
  7. mezombie

    mezombie Senior Member

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    Back on topic

    I'm so thrilled to see another pharmaceutical company involved in an XMRV study! Here's more information on RAPID Pharmaceuticals , two of whose researchers are listed as study collaborators.

    If you click on "Pipeline" on the highlighted website, you'll see that the page is being updated with "vital information". Maybe that will be more good news for us?
  8. _Kim_

    _Kim_ Guest

    dmarie4301, this was already posted on another thread, but thanks for starting a new thread to discuss this. However, the title you chose is innacurate. It is the NCI not the NIH. It is not an article, it is a link to Dr. Ruscetti's website at the NCI and it doesn't mention XMRV treatment. Normally, I would just go in and edit the title, but I was afraid that you might take offense.

    How does a new title: Dr. Sandy Ruscetti's XMRV Research News sound?
  9. Dr. Yes

    Dr. Yes Shame on You

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    You did indeed post some really important information, dmarie! In fact, I linked to this thread on another one earlier today. I think we all clearly needed a laugh to release some of the stress and tension surrounding this and other issues lately. I'm sorry if you found the pics offensive, though I assure you they were from upscale sites (though I must point out that one was from Science Blogs, which I guess is sort of a porn site...). We always get a bit silly once in a while, but I assure you we'll be back to burning what's left of our CFS brains on this issue in no time.

    But as you were offended, I deleted that post as soon as I read your's.
  10. mezombie

    mezombie Senior Member

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    Sorry, Kim, I beg to differ. From Ruscetti's website:

  11. _Kim_

    _Kim_ Guest

    As I read it, Ruscetti's lab is trying to develop animal models for testing, they are not actually developing XMRV treatments.
  12. Andrew

    Andrew Senior Member

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    FWIW, it looks to me like they are developing animal models for testing possible XMRV drugs before they are given to humans. This seems to fit the broad category of treatment development. Also, this takes place at NCI, which is part of the NIH. So the title is really not wrong.
  13. dmarie4301

    dmarie4301 Guest

    Well, whatever Kim, it came to me in the form of what I would call an article. My apologies for saying it was the NIH. It sounded to me that they were looking at the envelope to develop antibodies and that they are moving closer in finding ways of creating treatments. I dont profess to be a perfectionist and analyise every little nuance in an "article" , etc. I was just trying to contribute to get information to the board. It feels like the board is above my head and I need to stay out of the conversations.

    Thanks to those who tried to defend me and no thanks to those who put near porno after my comment, negating the importance of this latest info. And sorry I didnt know it was posted somewhere else.

    Nevertheless, I appreciate this forum and Cort very much.

    Go ahead and change the title, Kim, so it will be accurate.
  14. anne

    anne Guest

    Dear DMarie...Please don't be upset. Nobody's trying to turn anything into "porno," at least not here. Nor is anyone trying to negate the importance of anything. We're all pretty deadly serious about this illness and the matters you are posting on, but sometimes that means laughing at it all, too. We're allowed to laugh and make jokes, and that's not remotely intended to derail a topic or disrespect the poster. I know you got upset earlier because people weren't answering a question you'd asked, and all I can say is please don't take it all so personally, because its very hard to be in a forum if you do, and I'm guessing you, like the rest of us, don't need any more crap in your life. It's an internet message board, things move quickly, it can be hard to focus on who is doing what, and sometimes people's questions don't get answered, and sometimes people make jokes. You'll see lots of threads here are filled with little side trips and jokes. But that's the nature of the beast. It's a very good beast here, but--and I mean this very kindly--it's going to be hard for you if you get emotionally wrapped up in the mechanics of responses. Please don't think anyone is picking on you or ignoring you. These things are just freewheeling, and both incredibly personal but terribly impersonal, too. No one's keeping track of who is posting what news, etc. Put your feet up, post links, join on in. It's all good.
  15. George

    George Guest

    a formal Apology to dmarie

    I am so sorry dmarie, I thought that you had taken the Ruscetti post from Gracenotes thread and placed it here. Then I got playful and added the information from Dr. Sing's site and suggested the Hot girls of XMRV as a joke.

    I did not realize that your posting was from another source entirely and had nothing to do with the Russcetti info that I had posted earlier.

    I apologize from the bottom of my heart. Please accept my sincerest regrets for causing a hijaking of this thread. I will PM Kim and maybe we can separate two threads out. If that's o.k. with you. We can leave the Russcetti artical and then tease out the Movie ideal onto it's own thread.

    Please let me know if that's o.k. with you.
    Again my Apologies
    George
  16. oerganix

    oerganix Senior Member

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    Looks to me like it does mention treatment: "We now plan to apply our knowledge of the pathogenesis of mouse retroviruses that cause cancer and neurological disease in rodents to study the molecular basis for similar diseases associated with XMRV. We are in the process of developing rodent models for determining the biological effects of XMRV in vivo, which if successful will provide a small animal model for preclinical testing of potential anti-XMRV drugs.

  17. ixchelkali

    ixchelkali Senior Member

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    National Cancer Institute continuing XMRV studies

    From the NCI website at http://ccr.cancer.gov/Staff/staff.asp?profileid=5518

    Cancer and Neuroimmune Diseases Induced by the Human Retrovirus XMRV

    We are currently using knowledge and reagents obtained from working with mouse retroviruses to study the xenotropic MuLV-related human retrovirus XMRV, which was recently discovered through an association with prostate cancer. In collaboration with the laboratories of Judy Mikovits and Frank Ruscetti, we were able to use antibodies developed against the envelope protein of SFFV to detect infectious XMRV in the blood cells and plasma of patients suffering from the neuroimmune disease chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We were further able to develop a seroconversion assay using cells expressing the SFFV envelope protein to detect antibodies against the virus in the plasma of CFS patients. We now plan to apply our knowledge of the pathogenesis of mouse retroviruses that cause cancer and neurological disease in rodents to study the molecular basis for similar diseases associated with XMRV. We are in the process of developing rodent models for determining the biological effects of XMRV in vivo, which if successful will provide a small animal model for preclinical testing of potential anti-XMRV drugs. In addition, we are testing both in vitro and in vivo the biological effects of the envelope protein of XMRV, which like its related SFFV counterpart may be responsible for the pathogenicity of XMRV.

    Collaborators:

    Collaborators on this research are Dr. Frank Ruscetti, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, CCR, NCI; Dr. Larry Keefer, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, CCR, NCI; Dr. Judy Mikovits, Whittemore Peterson Institute; Drs. Candace Pert and Michael Ruff, RAPID Pharmaceuticals.
  18. Ecoclimber

    Ecoclimber Senior Member

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    Ah, we were just only mice :)
  19. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

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    THanks DMarie, the forum is an interesting mix of levity and science. I enjoy both of them - I think the humor is outrageous -= not what you'd expect from a bunch of twisted malingerers.

    On the science side I thought that was very interesting post. This is what I just posted in the XMRV Buzz page I put up.

    The envelope appears to be key; this virus has very low viral loads - it not doing much in the immune cells - so how does it negatively effect the body? Envelope proteins and thankfully there appears to a precedence for this in other murine retroviruses.
  20. cfs since 1998

    cfs since 1998 *****

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    Very low loads in the blood/plasma. Maybe it's doing its damage to the immune system in the lymph glands. Just a speculation of course.

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