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Appreciate any advice on my GI effects and CSA test results

Discussion in 'The Gut: De Meirleir & Maes; H2S; Leaky Gut' started by Keep Going Forward, Dec 2, 2013.

  1. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    I ran these tests through Dr. Amy Yasko and got her input, but I really want to understand it more. The Yersinia seems to be the big concern. My MD would not prescribe antibiotics so I am taking caprylic acid. Grapefruit seed extract is also recommended, but I was not sure I should take that as I am on the antidepressant Pristiq.

    I think my problems go back 10 years when I was sick alot and took alot of antibiotics including Cipro. I think that ruined my gut and triggered gluten intolerance. I didn't realize this until last year when I went gluten free. I have some celiac genes, but have not been tested. My functional med dr wants me to eat high protein, no grains, no GMOS or processed foods. I have a very hard time doing this. Eggs and meat protein are not appealing to me. I feel like I have malnutrition and can't absorb nutrients. I don't know if I should be eating a GAPS type diet, juicing greens, eating high protein, taking lots of supplements, or do Kerry Rivera's CD and parasite protocol. I am awaiting results for iodine levels, adrenal, thyroid, and spectracell. I also have my methylation genetics through Yasko and a MAP test if anyone is interested. I think I have serious undermethylation and detox problems, but my functional Dr does not.

    If anyone can help give me direction I would appreciate it. Also tell me how serious this is. Thanks!
     

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  2. barbican1

    barbican1

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    Hi,
    what are your main symptoms?
     
  3. PathogenKiller

    PathogenKiller

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    I know this is very old now, but I wanted to see what you'd decided to do. Did you take the augmentin? I'd be curious if you has mycoplasma or strep that is detectable in the blood. Have you run antistreptolysin o and mycoplasma PCR?

    The yersinia, yeast and pseudomonas need treating and you need to be supplementing some enzymes to help digestion of fats. These two things should help you start feeling better.

    I think you need the enzymes desperately if you plan on doing high protein diets.
     
  4. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    Hi PathogenKiller! I did not do augmentin as I couldn't get a doctor to prescribe it. I showed my results to two different MDs. I am not familiar with the antistreptolysin O or mycoplasma PCR. I started taking caprylic acid for the yersinia. Actually I have now started doing chlorine dioxide/MMS, although I am a little scared of it, but there are people getting real results from it. I have also been looking at the ketogenic diet or something similar. Testing shows fat malabsorption. I have enzymes, but have not been taking them. What do you recommend? Also what about bile salts? They help with fat digestion. What about HCL? Its hard to do this alone! I have a chiropractic nutritionist I went to but he didn't give me enzymes and I'm not sure he is helping me. Do you know about MMS? What are your thoughts? Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2014
  5. PathogenKiller

    PathogenKiller

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    I'm guessing the MDs said they didn't believe in the test results?

    You should read up on the 4 R program. But I'm not sure you are gonna get yersina, pseudomonas and yeast with that caprylic. Did your functional med doc refuse to treat those?

    I do NOT believe MMS is safe and would not take it, personally. I believe in science.

    I like digest gold by enzymatica paired with glutenease for its DPPIV.
     
  6. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    I think the MDs were not familiar with those test or those germs, so they ignored them. My chiro/nutritionist wanted me to continue the caprylic acid. I don't think he is very knowledgeable about those germs either. I brought those test results to my appointment. They were run through Dr. Amy Yasko. He doesn't normally run a CSA test.

    Seems like I may need a new doctor! I get more help online than anywhere. I just joined Primal Body Primal Mind facebook group and asked a question about my gluten sensitivity and the book author Nora Gedgaudas responded! She suggested I get some testing done through Cyrex labs.

    I read your story and was so impressed and amazed with your knowledge! You are fearless! I'm willing to go deep into this also as far as my little brain will take me. So how do I get rid of the Yersinia, Pseudomonas, and mycoplasma? Also, On my Genova Effects test, what does the quintile rankings mean? 1st quintile is low, 5th is high? Where do we want to see things?

    Thanks
     
  7. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    Pathogen Killer, are you familiar with Dr. Yasko's supplements? She makes recommendations on the tests you run through her although you don't get to actually meet her or be a patient/client. She recommended IMF 9 and anaerobic X for the mycoplasma, candisol and florastor for the yeast, psx and strx for the pxeudomonas and strep. I had been taking these but was taking so many supplements on her protocol I was overwhelmed and didn't know where to focus or prioritize.
     
  8. PathogenKiller

    PathogenKiller

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    Have you tried a Rheumatologist or a Lyme Literate medical dr?

    Lyme docs are more familiar with pathogens then the mainstream.

    Yes, I know Yasko... Do you have any mthfr issues? I don't care about the others.

    Yes, I'm familiar with all the supplements but psx and strx. Imf9 did nothing for my myco and is so expensive. Candisol did nothing for my yeast

    I'm not huge into gluten sensitivity tests. If you have leaky gut then it's all a moot point and you do have leaky gut.

    What are your symptoms? Ill try to give you some ideas.
     
  9. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    I have not tried a rheum or llmd. I do have mthfr c677t (heterozygous) and many other heterozygous snps. I am ++ for Taq Fok.

    My symptoms are actually limited compared to many people on these forums. I have been on antidepressants for years. Controlled horrible PMS using birth control for 27 years. Depression turned into anxiety, I became easily stressed. But I am managing that fine now by avoiding stressful situations. My complaint is - I just get tired easily. I get back pain, like lactic acid build up. I have to limit how much I do. I have geared down my life to just the basics. I do some work, then rest, work, rest. I have to lay down a lot and I sleep a lot. Luckily I am a stay at home mom. I don't think I could work full time like I used to. I think I was weakened by my twins' childbirth by cesarean and the subsequent exhaustion caring for them. Then took multiple antibiotics for illnesses including Cipro which ruined my gut. I gained weight so fast at one point my upper abdomen was hurting from being stretched. Friends thought I was pregnant. Its only been the last year and a half that I have tried to address this problem. I have lost 27 pounds.

    Here is her response:

    Nora Gedgaudas Jan--If you have been gluten free for more than just a few months, it may be virtually impossible to clearly identify your specific brand of gluten sensitivity at this point. You could go through EnteroLabs and do their genetic testing to determine whether or not you possess the HLA-DQ genotype associated with celiac disease or not. The best and most accurate, comprehensive and sensitive gluten sensitivity testing in the world, however, is through Cyrex labs-- and I often recommend people do their array 3 testing for gluten sensitivity-- even if they already consider themselves gluten-free-- because it can help confirm whether or not you are getting some form of inadvertent exposure. That said, I wouldn’t expect it to reveal much beyond that at this point. In a person that is still eating gluten-containing foods a combination of array 2 and array 3 can supply enough information to offer you about a 95%+ accuracy in identifying celiac disease.
    Mind you (and I’m sure you probably already realize this), eight out of 10 celiac patients have no gastrointestinal symptoms at all, and the primary manifestation is most commonly with the brain and nervous system-- although it can literally affect virtually any organ or tissue anywhere in the body. Once you are no longer producing antibodies to gluten (which of course does not mean that it’s ever okay to go back to consuming it) it is unlikely that immunologic testing will reveal very much in terms of a celiac diagnosis.
    Given your history, however, I believe it is well worth running a series of Cyrex labs arrays (if you can possibly swing it, Arrays 2 through 5… And maybe even Array 11) in order to:
    1) Identify whether or not you have gut barrier compromise (i.e., a “leaky gut”)-- and also what the nature of that leaky gut is: whether it is strictly occluding/zonulin-based related to dietary antigen exposure OR whether it may be related instead to the presence of lipopolysaccharides (i.e., some form of dysbiosis/SIBO).
    2) Whether or not you are getting some inadvertent form of exposure to gluten AND whether there is gluten-related tissue damage occurring or not. The Cyrex Array 3 panel (in addition to measuring different immunoglobulin types of reactivity to nine different epitopes of gluten-- fully eight more than anyone else tests for) additionally screens for the presence of transglutaminase enzymes, and even breaks this down into transglutaminase-2 (gluten related G.I. tract damage), transglutaminase-3 (gluten related epidermal damage), or transglutaminase-6 (gluten related damage to the brain and nervous system).
    3) Test for 28 different foods commonly eaten on a gluten-free diet to see if you may have an undiagnosed immunoreactivity to them. 13 of these foods are known cross-reactive compounds with gluten that many individuals regularly consume on a gluten-free diet thinking they are okay (when they may not be at all). Very valuable to know.
    4) Whether or not you are producing antibodies against any one of 24 different tissue complexes in your body and what the nature of that compromise is. This isn’t so you can lose sleep over what’s happening but instead to empower you with information about tissues in your body that may need specific support, along with which are being most affected by autoimmune processes. The Cyrex Array 5 “tissue immune reactivity panel” isn’t really about diagnosing autoimmune “disease”, per se—but rather helping you identify areas of compromise so that you better know what to prioritize. I consider this one of the most and unique valuable tests Cyrex offers.
    5) If you can swing it, Cyrex labs array 11 panel, also known as the “chemical immunoreactivity screen” measures your levels of immunoreactivity to various common substances and environmental compounds, including some heavy metals. None of the substances tested in this array are good for anyone, however having an immune reactivity to any of them reveals the likeliest potential of these substances causing you particular problems. I have seen information from this particular array really make a difference for some people.
    I have seen Cyrex labs testing truly change lives and often reveal answers nothing else has ever been able to provide. Were I you (and if you have the means) this is the direction I would go.


    I would have to go to a "certified gluten practitioner" to do this testing. Appreciate your thoughts!
     
  10. PathogenKiller

    PathogenKiller

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    With your CDSA, you most certainly have leaky gut.

    Describe your current digestion. Loose stool? Gastro issues? What is your current diet? Any thyroid issues? you mention anxiety after your second and you have yersinia in your stool, yersinia likes to attack the thyroid. Have you had that tested?


    Your story sound very much like mine. I went down like a ton of bricks after my second daughters birth and abx after c section.
     
  11. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    I have normal formed stools, lighter in color. I go about every other day, unless I take something to help go more often. I don't have gas, but occasionally diarrhea.

    I eat gluten free, low dairy and low sugar. I try to limit processed foods, but usually have some potato, rice or corn chips in the afternoon. I eat eggs or plain yogurt and fruit for breakfast. Also eat fruit, chicken, beef, pork, some fish, carrots, broccoli, squash, onions, potatoes, greens, cabbage, brussel sprouts and nuts. Occasionally eat rice with dinner. I have started to make chicken broth and bought my first grass fed liver that is in the freezer.

    I was tested at a regular MD, standard testing found high FSH of 84 (post menopausal). Chiro/nutritionist test found low T3 of 73. Iodine was low. I&I loading 40 (range >44), I&I saturation 79 (range > 90) I do have a big fat tongue and get cold at night in the winter. Cortisol was low. He put me on iodine and adrenal support.
     
  12. Keep Going Forward

    Keep Going Forward

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    I also sometimes have low blood pressure when I get up from sitting or laying. I have been trying to eat more sea salt. I think my blood sugar get low sometimes if I don't eat enough carbs.
     
  13. PathogenKiller

    PathogenKiller

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    So, you are just gluten free incase? You have no corrolatable symptoms when you did eat gluten?

    If your t3 is low you may want to get a full panel. But if you do find that it's outta whack don't get too discouraged till you treat the yersinia.

    My husband had yersina too, by blood test. Be aware when we went after the yersinia then he has had to deal with yeast. Currently we are still dealing with yeast for him. Yersinia cross reacts with Lyme on western blot, so if you do end up at an LLMD, then it's good to know you do have yersinia in stool.
     

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