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anything help blunt effects of falling barometric pressure?

Discussion in 'General Symptoms' started by November Girl, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. November Girl

    November Girl Senior Member

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    Texas
    With falling air pressure, my pain is way high, and my physical and mental energy are way low. I'm curious if anything tends to help with this. If the high level of positive ions is the problem, is there such a thing as negative ion therapy?
     
    sianrecovery and merylg like this.
  2. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Midwest USA
    There is such a thing as negative ion therapy...that's why I think I feel better at the ocean. But there are room sized negative ion generators. I'm not certain if they work though or if they are just a scam.

    Falling pressure causes us to release cortisol and many of us are deficient in cortisol or have a dysregulated HPA axis which causes the adrenals not to put out the necessary cortisol. For me, this would look like an increase in symptoms - especially inflammatory pain as cortisol is an antiinflammatory - and increased dizziness and nausea. All low cortisol symptoms.

    I would consider getting an adrenal saliva cortisol test done to assess your levels if you haven't done that already. I am much less affected now that my cortisol is replaced. It's not perfect but vastly improved.
     
    merylg likes this.
  3. Marlène

    Marlène Senior Member

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    Edegem, Belgium
    There are lamps made of rock salt, halite.
    Google salt lamp, I bought mine second hand and it works just fine.
     
    merylg likes this.
  4. voner

    voner Senior Member

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    November girl,

    Falling barometric pressure sometimes knocks the hell out of me also.

    If you dig deep into this post and search you will find a reference that Dr. Cheney makes as to why falling barometric pressure affect so so much.

    http://www.dfwcfids.org/medical/cheney/hrt04lng.htm

    Maybe that can confer a way to blunt the effects of falling barometric pressure.
     
  5. sianrecovery

    sianrecovery Senior Member

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    Manchester UK
    Hi November Girl

    Delighted to have identification on this, my levels of pain rise sharply with falling barometric presssure. A dentist said in terms of facial pain, there can be small pockets of gas caused by long term infections which react to pressure, and when I saw Dr Fry in AZ I asked him about this and he said his surgery always filled up with dramatic changes in pressure. As pressure drops, also more mold spores are released. Many people I know with long term inflamatory or nerve pain experience the same.
    Unfortunately, I have no answers - maybe someone else will.
     
  6. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    I get severe headaches with falling or rising barometric pressure which can last for days. High dose fish oil helps me significantly. I take 1-1/2 tsp of pharmaceutical grade fish oil per day. It also helps PMS, mood, etc.
     
  7. voner

    voner Senior Member

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    I found Dr. Cheney's reference to falling barometric pressure. He claims it's due to carbon dioxide levels changing inside your body, which are related to redox reactions inside the human body.... ..

    For what it is worth, Here's a bit edited version of what he had to say;

    ........

    How to Block Peroxynitrite

    1) Increase CO2

    Let's turn to peroxynitrite. According to the Textbook of Medicine, and Dr. Pall himself, what is your primary scavenger of peroxynitrite? The answer is CO2. Carbon dioxide. When ATP is generated in the mitochondria, CO2 is produced as a by-product. So, when you make energy [ATP], you produce the very thing needed to scavenge peroxynitrite. It's a beautiful system! When everything works perfectly, you can make a lot of ATP because superoxide is being broken down into water. And CO2 is produced which will get rid of any peroxynitrite that accidentally happens to be produced.

    What a great system! If that system could be maintained in the state it was in when you were born, you should live to 120 to 140 years of age. It's just that things creep in that degrade that operation, that system, and we just exit out earlier than we should.

    Now, if you keep lowering ATP production, which then reduces the amount superoxide produced, you also reduce the production of CO2. "The result is you have less and less primary defense against peroxynitrite. It's a vicious cycle. And especially in the lowest energy states of all you really have that problem."

    How do you increase CO2? Well, first let me ask how you decrease CO2, which we definitely don't want! Hyperventilation. If you hyperventilate, you dramatically decrease CO2, which would be highly damaging. It can produce carpal-pedal spasms in some patients (carpal: wrist; pedal: foot). Its most damaging effect is to your brain, however.


    Rebreathing: You can increase CO2—and stop hyperventilation—by rebreathing. By inhaling your expired CO2, you actually scavenge peroxynitrite. [Rebreathing involves cupping your hands over your nose and mouth so that when you exhale, your CO2 is trapped there and then you inhale it. Do this for a minute at a time, about once every four or five minutes during a thirty-minute period once or twice a day. You can also do this while breathing oxygen through a nasal cannula. Rebreathing can also help address respiratory alkalosis, extremely common in CFIDS, thereby improving microcirculation by shifting blood pH—thus allowing more oxygen to be transported off the hemoglobin.]


    Barometric Pressure: Another way to do it is to walk in Death Valley. Below sea level, with all the extra oxygen, you hypoventilate and that will increase CO2. [hypoventilate: breathe abnormally slow and shallow] The opposite is flying in aircraft at 10K feet, causing you to hyperventilate, so flying in airplanes is not good. CFIDS patients often feel bad when low pressure comes through their area and they ache, among other things. Low pressures are like climbing to high altitude, and you don't do as well, because you tend to hyperventilate more.

    ..............
     
  8. Marlène

    Marlène Senior Member

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    Edegem, Belgium
    Maybe the saltpipe is something you can consider too.
    A fellow sufferer learned me about this product and everyone uses it in the house. My son with asthma, my youngest who has similar symptoms as mine, my other son with Hashimoto.

    It is rather cheap, 25 euro and you can use it 6 months. It is as if you walk every day on the beach. Your lungs get boosted with the right ions. It works excellent when you are very sensitive for air pollution too (traffic, fumes, mold, ...).

    http://www.the-new-saltpipe.com/products_products.php
    http://www.the-new-saltpipe.com/clinical-studies.php
     

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