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Anybody found green tea beneficial - does it vasodilate or vasoconstrict?

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by Bansaw, May 4, 2016.

  1. Bansaw

    Bansaw Senior Member

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    My Korean friends tell me that Jasmine tea (it has green tea base) is very good for digestion and breaks down fats well.
    Has anyone found green tea/jasmine tea helpful in anyway?
    There seems to be conflicting reports out there that green tea because it contains caffeine it vasoconstricts, but other reports saying it vasodilates.
    I am interested in antioxidants since my methylation cycle might not be working well and maybe low on Glutathione.
    Plus green tea = metabolism help, and that might mean a touch more energy.

    Any comments?
     
  2. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    @Bansaw Green tea gives me the jitters. I think it's because it's high in oxalates.

    I'd say it's a vasodilator. Also with teas though there's a difference in properties when you drink it cold vs hot, made with boiling water vs lukewarm (sun tea), etc. There's a lot of things to take into account.
     
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  3. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    I would try it and see.

    jasmin comes in black and green tea variants and should not contain any flowers. They store tea in the same room as jasmin flowers that lend their essence to the tea. But some cheap teas do contain the flowers.

    You may want to try other teas (white, oolong, pu erh etc.) and as Effi wrote you can make the same tea in many different ways, as hot, warm or cold extractions at varying strengths and for varying lengths of time.

    I really cannot stand jasmin, though I loved it when I was a kid and I guess you could call it a gateway drug, as it was the first tea I remember really being interested in at 5 or 6 or whenever it was. These days it gives me a headache.
     
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  4. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    I've been drinking 2-3 cups of green tea lately. Since it isn't brewed for long and doesn't contain as much caffeine as black tea or coffee, it's less stimulating in that way.

    Caffeine, apparently, will initially constrict vessels, but, relaxes them in the long run. ( confusing )

    Green tea can effect vessels either way, adaptogenic, possibly depending on EGCG content .

    Green tea is antimicrobial, so if there is inflammation/infection, it may reduce nitric oxide, ( vasodilator ), production by inhibiting the pathogen growth.

    It can also increase eNOS, a nitric oxide producing enzyme, which would dilate and relax vessels.

    So, if someone has excess nitric oxide production with vasodilation, green tea could worsen it.
     
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  5. u&iraok

    u&iraok Senior Member

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    I sometimes find green tea helpful if it's a time when I can handle the caffeine. I'm not sure what it is in it, but I'm thinking it could be the theanine--it clears my head and gives me a slight boost and calms me down at the same time (kind of like what people say cigarettes did for them).

    Matcha seems to work best for me.

    Be careful if you have a thyroid problem--they can contain a lot of fluoride and the ones from China can have heavy metals and other toxins in them.
     
  6. lnester7

    lnester7 Seven

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    Green tea is a Th2 shifter, I had my immune profile done and would not be good for me (I think diseases like RA that are th2 would not be good either).

    Green tea crashes me so I guess you can try and monitor if you feel better or worse. Just don't add anything else new nor increase activity so you can isolate the test.
     
  7. u&iraok

    u&iraok Senior Member

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    What?! Green tea shifts the immune system to Th2, all by it's little self?

    I found an article about it with two references. One reference didn't have anything about green tea:

    Kroemer, Guido, Hirsch, François, González-García, Ana and Martínez-A, Carlos. Differential Involvement of Thl and Th2 Cytokines in Autoimmune Diseases. Autoimmunity 24 no.1 (1996): 25-33:

    The other I couldn't access: Prete, Gianfranco Del. The Concept of Type-1 and Type-2 Helper T Cells and Their Cytokines in Humans. International Reviews of Immunology 16 no.3 (1998): 427-455.

    Do you have an info on it?
     
  8. lnester7

    lnester7 Seven

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  9. Violeta

    Violeta Senior Member

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    Yogi brand decaf green tea tastes really good and is low enough in caffeine that I can drink it at night and it doesn't affect my sleep. The veins on my hands have retracted during this time, but I am also taking a few things for candida, if that would make a difference in vasodilation.

    I wonder if green tea is listed as not being good for those with Th2 dominance because the caffeine is hard on the adrenals? If so, decaf may be the answer.
     
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  10. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    I went off tea and coffee at the begining of last year because the advice I was given was that the caffeine would increase my anxiety. At the time I did not know that I had POTS and that POTS was causing the anxiety.

    After a month or so I looked at publmed and all the studies I could find that were done on tea (green, black and oolong) in humans showed that it reduced people's stress hormones or made them better able to handle stressors.

    Just glancing at pubmed and skimming a handful of abstracts

    it seems that tea works as a vasodilator
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21394199

    and that green tea extracts might inhibit fat digestion
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25683932
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15539342
     
  11. Clerner

    Clerner Senior Member

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    I tried licorice tea once (strong flavor)and something went horribly wrong. I felt spaced-out, slowed down like on drugs, tired, could hardly move, heartbeat felt weird. Anybody know why? I bought it bc I thought it would help my adrenals.
     
  12. u&iraok

    u&iraok Senior Member

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    Licorice can raise blood pressure and/or lower potassium levels. Could it have been one or both of those?
     
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  13. Clerner

    Clerner Senior Member

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    Interesting. I bet it was my blood pressure. I felt like I could just drop on the floor. Thanks!
     
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  14. bluelemonade

    bluelemonade

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    Green tea comes from the Camelia Sinensis plant, just like white and black tea. I found out the hard way that tea is not as healthy as everyone says. It can suppress thyroid function. For me, over the course of two years after I started drinking it, I slowly became irritable, depressed, introverted, tired, and my feet got colder and colder. I didn't think it was related to the tea of course. In fact, I drank even more tea because of feeling cold. But the tea plant is grown usually in China and India where the soil contains a lot of aluminum and fluoride. The tea plant is unique in that it absorbs both, and concentrates them in the leaves, which then go into our tea. Organically grown tea has this problem too.

    The most dangerous aspect of tea is that it's effect on the thyroid will not show in routine blood tests. Tea lowers TSH, so you end up with what is clinically called "secondary hypothyroidism", and this can only be seen in the more extensive testing not routinely done.

    If you decide to drink tea, be sure not to soak the bags more than two minutes, as this will give you the benefits of tea with less of the contaminants.
     
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  15. Mogwai

    Mogwai

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    It suppressed my thyroid function as well.
     
  16. Bansaw

    Bansaw Senior Member

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    What about red tea (rooibos) ? I drink that a lot.
     

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