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Antihistamines as Th1/Th2 Immunomodulators.

Discussion in 'Immunological' started by Ema, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Looks like cetirizine (Zyrtec) and fexofenadine (Allegra) may not be the best choices for antihistamines for those wanting to promote a Th1 response.


     
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  2. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    Just found a pdf of this paper here.

    Three things that come to mind:

    1. Interferon-gamma is only high in pwME who have been ill for less than 3 years according to the Hornig/Lipkin cytokine study. It's slightly low after 3 years. So are many other cytokines.
    2. @Jonathan Edwards is sceptical about a Th1-Th2 shift, I understand.
    3. This study was ex vivo/in vitro, so limited conclusions can be drawn.

    Interesting nonetheless.
     
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  3. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Interferon gamma seems to be an important part of the Th1 response which seems to be consistently lacking in our population. Increasing it (especially if it is low in later stage disease) seems to be helpful for many. I think this is one of the reasons that LDN is useful (along with reducing inflammation in general) and other known Th1 shifters.

    But certainly a healthy population may have a differing cytokine response to any agent, including antihistamines.

    JE seems to be skeptical and dismissive of just about everything to do with anything so far.

    To be fair, many doctors are skeptical about the relevance of the Th1/Th2 theory though, and I agree that the seesaw analogy seems overly simplistic.

    That said, I think that avoiding things that are known to propagate a Th2 response or to inhibit a Th1 response is probably a reasonable approach for many of us, especially those with viral or intracellular infections.

    True. More research is needed to draw any conclusions. I just thought it was interesting that antihistamines, along with antivirals and antibiotics are all immunomodulatory. Just goes to show how little we know about how all these medicines really work in our body for the most part.

    And, many people take antihistamines so between this and the recent Lyme/Claritin link, it's looking like loratadine may be a better choice considering the limited information at hand.
     
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  4. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    That has certainly not been my experience. I think that you are doing Prof Edwards a great disservice, but I am sure he will cope!
     

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