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Analysis Of Himalayan Pink Salt - Salt-Loading, Sole, General Interest.

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by Jigsaw, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    I came across this yesterday, and thought it would be useful for anyone using the salt-loading/ salt-water for detox protocol.

    https://themeadow.com/pages/minerals-in-himalayan-pink-salt-spectral-analysis

    It came as a surprise that there is so little fluoride in it, considering this - http://naturalhealthnews.blogspot.co.uk/2008/01/salt-may-be-health-scam.html

    Fluoride is a naturally occuring mineral, as well as a manufactured by-product of industry. In its naturally occuring tiny amounts, it isn't harmful to us. In the huge amounts that they put in tap water and toothpaste, it very certainly IS damaging.

    I don't know where Natural Health News got their figures from, but they are wildly different from these that I've linked to here. If you notice, this damnation of pink salt appears to have been published on a Celtic Sea-salt site. Who's to say which bias, if there is any bias, is the least accurate?

    I've noticed that some people are concerned about the chloride content of salts - it's worth noting that chlorIDE and chlorINE are different beasts. ChlorIDE is naturally occuring and vital for all animal life. ChlorINE is the damaging man-made chemical that is put in swimming pools and water supplies as a disinfectant. ChlorIDE is highly useful in helping detox bromine/ bromide when starting iodosupplementation, hence the salt-loading protocol. Yes, chloride competes with other halides (bromide, iodide, fluoride, etc) for receptor space, but that's why you don't take the salt water until at least 40-60 minutes AFTER taking iodine.

    I also saw a thread recently that expressed worry over using bottled mineral water for diluting iodine, because they thought mineral water contains chlorINE. It doesn't. It contains chlorIDE.




    In essence, the following are the constituents of Himalayan Pink salt.

    Figures are in grams per kilo (g/kg,), which is the same as milligrams per gram (mg/g), and micrograms per milligram (mcg/mg). I've put them in order of quantity, and alphabetically where possible. I have calculated (roughly) how much a teaspoon, 1/2 tsp, 1/4 tsp, and 1/8th tsp contains of the predominant minerals/ elements, and those amounts appear underneath the following elements/ minerals list.

    Chloride (Cl) .............590.93
    Sodium (Na)...............382.61
    Sulfur (S).......................12.40
    Calcium (Ca)...................4.05
    Potassium (K)..................3.50
    Oxygen (O).......................1.20
    Lithium (Li).....................0.40
    Hydrogen (H)..................0.30
    Magnesium (Mg)..............0.16
    Strontium (Sr).................0.014
    Iodine (I)........................<0.10
    Fluoride (F)....................<0.10
    Silicon (Si).,....................<0.10
    Phosphorus (P)...............<0.10



    Iron (Fe)................... 38.90 ppm (38.9 parts per million is equivalent to 38.9mcg per gram)
    Dysprosium (Dy)........<4.00 ppm
    Europium (Eu)...........<3.00 ppm
    Rhenium (Re).............<2.50 ppm
    Zinc (Zn).....................<2.38 ppm
    BROMINE (Br)..............2.10 ppm
    Iridium (Ir).................<2.00 ppm (2 parts per million is equivalent to 2mcg per gram)
    Barium (Ba).............. ....1.96 ppm
    Tantalum (Ta)...............1.10 ppm
    Gold (Au)....................<1.00 ppm (1 part per million is equivalent to 1mcg per gram)
    Francium (Fr).............<1.00 ppm


    Aluminium (Al).............0.661 ppm
    Cobalt (Co)....................0.600 ppm
    Copper (Cu)...................0.560 ppm
    Platinum (Pr).................0.470 ppm
    Manganese (Ma)............0.270 ppm
    Nickel (Ni)......................0.130 ppm
    Lead (Pb)........................0.100 ppm
    Bismuth (Bi).................<0.100 ppm
    Thalium (Ta)..................0.060 ppm
    Vanadium (V)................0.060 ppm
    Chromium (Cr)..............0.050 ppm
    Selenium (Se)................0.050 ppm
    Rubidium (Rb)..............0.040 ppm
    Silver (Ag)......................0.031 ppm
    Mercury (Hg)..............<0.030 ppm
    Nitrogen (N)..................0.024 ppm

    (Apologies for the less-than crisp attempt at tabulating the columns - my iPad doesn't appear to have a tab key, and refuses to line up correctly in the font on this board. I'm not yet very good at using the formatting tools here, but I've done my best!)


    Less than 0.01 ppm - Antimony (Sb), Arsenic (As), Beryllium (Be), Cadmium (Cd), Molybdenum (Mo), Tin (Sn).

    Less than 0.001 ppm -

    Actinium (Ac)
    Astatine (At)
    Boron (B)
    Carbon (C)
    Cerium (Ce)
    Cesium (Cs)
    Erbium (Er)
    Gadolinium (Gd)
    Gallium (Ga)
    Germanium (Ge)
    Hafnium (Hf)
    Holonium (Ho)
    Indium (In)
    Lanthanum (La)
    Lutetium (Lu)
    Neodymium (Nd)
    Neptunium (Np)
    Niobium (Nb)
    Osmium (Os)
    Palladium (Pd)
    Plutonium (Pu)
    Polonium (Po)
    Praseodymium (Pr)
    Protactinum (Pa)
    Radium (Ra)
    Rhodium (Rh)
    Ruthenium (Ru)
    Samarium (Sm)
    Tellerium (Te)
    Terbium (Tb)
    Thulium (Tm)
    Thorium (Th)
    Titanium (Ti)
    Uranium (U)
    Wolfram (W)
    Yterbium (Y)
    Ytterbium (Yb)
    Zirconium (Zr)

    Total: 85 elements/ minerals.


    Plus two Unstabke Artificial Isotopes, Promethium (Pm) and Technetium (Tc), no measurements given.




    Teaspoon Measurements Of Himalayan Pink Salt In MGs:

    Element......... 1 tsp .........1/2 tsp ........ 1/4 tsp .......1/8th tsp

    Chloride ............. 3,273.75...... 1,636.88 ......... 818.44 ........ 409.22
    Sodium................2,119.66 ........ 109.83 ........... 54.92 .......... 27.46
    Sulfur.......................68.70 ...........34.35 .............17.18 ............8.59
    Calcium .................. 22.44 ........... 11.22 .............5.61 .............2.81
    Potassium ................19.39 ............ 9.70 ..............4.85 .......... 2.42
    Oxygen.......................6.65 ..............3.33 ............ 1.66 ........... 0.83
    Lithium .................... 2.22............... 1.11 ..............0.56........... 0.28
    Hydrogen ................. 1.66 ............. 0.83 ............0.42 ........... 0.21
    Magnesium...............0.89 ...............0.45 ............0.22.............0.11
    Strontium .................0.08 ...............0.04 ...........0.02 ........... 0.01

    (I don't understand what's going on with formatting this table, but before it gets posted, the headings for tsp amounts are lined up with the quantities, yet after posting, the headings have all bunched up together. Putting dotted lines in seems to be the only way I can find to get round it.)

    So, in one teaspoon of Himalayan Pink salt, there are approx 3.27g Chloride, 2.120g Sodium, 68.7mg Sulfur, 22.44mg Calcium, 19.39mg Potassium, 6.65mg Oxygen, 2.22mg (222mcg) Lithium, 1.66mg (166mcg) Hydrogen, 890mcg Magnesium, and 80mcg Strontium.

    Abraham and Brownstein gave one of their particpating patients 10g sodium chloride per day day for a week to help with her bromine detox, as cited in Iodine Study #11 on the Optimox site http://www.optimox.com/iodine-study-11


    10g of Himalayan Pink salt is 2.8 teaspoons, although how you'd measure the point 8, I'm really not sure.


    Different versions of the salt-loading protocol advise users to also take a further 1/2 tsp of unrefined salt on their food throughout the course of each day, in addition to the amount taken in water.



    I hope this information is useful.

    @Wayne @PatJ @newuser22 @jlynx @keenly @WoolPippi @Bansaw @arewenearlythereyet @Gondwanaland
    @pamojja
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
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  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    In the UK, in areas where fluoride is naturally present in the drinking water, fluoride levels are comparable to the levels in artificially fluoridated water supplies. In the UK, there is around 1 mg/L of fluoride in artificially fluoridated water, but some UK areas naturally have up to 1.5 mg/L in the water. See this UK map of natural and artificially fluoridated water areas.

    China has areas where fluoride is naturally present in the drinking water in much higher amounts, as high as 8.6 mg/L in some areas (ref: 1), and some research in China has shown that children living in high fluoride areas have an IQ that on average is 7 points lower than children living in low fluoride areas. In China, water fluoridation is banned, as they have such a problem anyway with the high levels of fluoride that are naturally present in their drinkng water.
     
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  3. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    Thanks, Hip.

    That's useful.

    I know Joel Wallach reported that there's somewhere east-ish that has massively high natural levels of fluoride, and everyone there has horrible health problems because of it.

    I haven't got the ref for it anymore, but it could have been on one of his Dead Drs Don't Lie tapes. I remember him saying that all the inhabitants suffered from accelerated aging, and gross calcification of every organ system.

    I'll see if I can find the ref for it.
     
  4. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    This isn't what I'm looking for, but gives details of some studies that show fluoride is damaging to many aspects of health

    http://fluoridealert.org/issues/health/brain/
     
  5. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    I've read research showing that fluoride is mainly damaging when iodine levels are low. So make sure you get enough iodine if your water has high fluoride levels.
     
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  6. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    Thanks @adreno

    Yes, I saw that just yesterday. Interesting that fluorosis is worse in iodine deficiency states.

    The reason I've posted about Himalayan salt here is because I'm currently working to reach iodine sufficiency, and salt-loading is very helpful in the safe elimination of toxic halides like bromine and fluorine, which iodine pushes off their receptors.

    So I'm good for iodine right now :) Or at least, I have higher levels now than I've had for decades.

    Curently up to 100mg/d, which was my target dose to help with FBD and to avoid (hopefully, and in theory and in numerous case reports it does work) future recurrence of breast cancer or new occurrence on other side. I got hit by that in 2007.

    Interestingly, given that I must already have been iodine deficient to develop breast cancer in the first place, that part of my chemo was a fluorine which would have blocked my iodine even more, and that I was made far more ill by the cancer treatments than I'd ever been before (which I now think was in part due to iodine deficiency), I got horrible brown stripes on my teeth (dental fluorosis) from using prescribed toothpaste for highly sensitive teeth (another chemo effect) which had high levels of fluoride. I only used it for a few weeks, a few months at most. That was 2007. My teeth have never recovered completely. Maybe iodosupplementation will reverse that, I don't know yet, but iodine is a contributing factor to bone health, and teeth are boned. I live in hope!

    Am guessing the gross lack of iodine in my body at that time made me more susceptible to fluorosis.
     
  7. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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  8. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    @Hip

    That target dose of 1mg/l seems extremely high.

    I was under the impression that "healthy" levels of fluoride were in the region of a few parts per million. Isn't 1mg/l considerably higher than that?
     
  9. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

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    I've been using sea salt with my food for many years, and for salt loading. Himalayan pink salt tastes and feels (in the mouth) somewhat soapy to me.
     
  10. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    Really? That's interesting.

    I don't get that from it at all. It just tastes nicer than table salt, less harsh and sharp, somehow.

    Hey, I noticed last night that my urine looked the same as you described yours to me yesterday! I guess I'm going to have to use you and your iodine experiences as a sort of guide of what's to come for me - you're obviously slightly further on than I am :)

    Mine looked definitely orange, and I also drink 2-3l/d water. Very strange. I haven't seen that reported in any of the case studies, case reports, etc. Have you?
     
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  11. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    1 mg per liter would be equal to 1 part per million (ppm), because one liter of water weighs 1 kg = 1000 grams = 1,000,000 milligrams. So 1 mg is a one-millionth part of 1 kg.

    My local water supply in London has a fluoride level of 0.13 mg/L, which is considered a low fluoride area.



    I had the same trouble as you trying to format tables on this forum; unfortunately there is no built-in table function, and when you instead try to use spaces to create table columns, those spaces get removed when you post, so it does not work. The only recourse I could find initially was to use a series of dots (......) to separate columns, as you have done above.

    However, there is a work-around for this, and that is to place your tables in a blue code box (which is available from the same text input area menu as the orange quote box). Inside a code box, any series of spaces that you use does not get removed when you post, so inside a code box, you can use a series of spaces to separate columns. An example of a table made using a blue code box is seen in this post.

    In that blue code box, I also used the Courier New font, as this is a monospace font (each character takes up the same horizontal space), which allows you to line up the columns perfectly. Helvetica, the default font on this forum, is a proportional font (in which wide letters like M take up more room horizontally that narrow letters like I), and such proportional fonts can cause problems with column line up.

    Even if you do not use a blue code box for your table, and use a series of dots instead to space columns, it is a good idea to use the monospace Courier New font for the table, as this will ensure perfect column line up. An example of a table that uses dots (......) to separate columns (rather than a code box) and the Courier New font to ensure perfect column line up is seen in this post.

    There is also a post preview option that you can use to check your table looks right before you post; that option is available by pressing the "More Options..." button found at the bottom right of the text input area.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
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  12. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    Thanks, @Hip

    :thumbsup:

    Good stuff, thanks for the clarification (numbers never were my strong suite) on ppm, and for the advice re tables on here. I'll get my head around that when I'm a bit less fogged up. o_O
     
  13. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Yes, computers and brain fog are not a good mix, I find.
     
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  14. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    Especially uncooperative ones.

    I'm sure my body's electro-magnetic field (or something) changes when I'm struggling.....I always hit stupid computer issues when I'm least able to cope with them. Either that or I've managed to infect my illness onto my iPad and laptop. :confused:

    Currently trying to copy-paste and stupid highlight section keeps flicking back to only one letter and will NOT stay as a piece of highlighted text. Or it decides to highlight the entire page :bang-head:

    Any advice? Have closed a pile of open tabs in case it's that that's causing it.

    Back to my lengthy multiquote post.......I hate it when people get the wrong end of the stick and start throwing accusations around when none were made. :(
     
  15. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    @Jigsaw I've never used an iPad, so I am not familiar with it. I use Mac desktop, and I also have a small 7 inch Android tablet, which I don't use much because I find it's too fiddly compared to a desktop machine.
     
  16. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    No experience of this daft issue of my copy-paste selection auto-reducing itself?
     
  17. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    If the iPad is anything like the Android text selection, then the tags located at either end of the selection can be dragged along to change what text is selected, so if you are accidentally touching those tags, then that might inadvertently alter the selection.
     
  18. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    The forum software supresses all blank spaces and blank lines
     
  19. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    BTW to stay on topic, I had major endocrine disruption from Hymalayan salt (just used for cooking, not loading). My thyroid seemed to have gone crazy on it, I would had palpitations, anxiety, smelling sweating. I thought it could be from the Bromine in it.
     
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  20. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Senior Member

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    No, for once it's not me. I'm dragging the "tags" (dots on a vertical line at each end) to extend the highlighted text portion, and when I release, the highlighted section is flicking back to the first character highlighted.

    Have since discovered that it does still do whatever it is I've asked it to do with the text I highlighted.

    It's probably an iOS 10.3.1 glitch. Another one (sigh) Keyboard freezes, too. Really useful when writing.
     
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