Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

American Psychological Assoc. ME/CFS feature article 10 2014

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Roy S, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. Roy S

    Roy S former DC ME/CFS lobbyist

    Messages:
    669
    Likes:
    1,405
    Illinois, USA
    The American Psychological Association Monitor has a feature article on ME/CFS in the October 2014 edition.
     
    Beyond Tired
     
    Chronic fatigue syndrome remains misunderstood and understudied. Psychologists are among those trying to change that.
     
    http://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/10/beyond-tired.aspx
     
  2. Cheesus

    Cheesus Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,224
    Likes:
    5,482
    UK
    This is actually a really great article.
     
    ahmo, xchocoholic and Bob like this.
  3. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,095
    Likes:
    17,172
    Decent article. Good to see something like this on the APA website.
     
    Bob likes this.
  4. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,257
    Likes:
    17,985
    Yep, that's a goodie. :thumbsup:
     
    Bob likes this.
  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,482
    Likes:
    35,013
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    I read this before, recently. I do not recall if it was another thread on PR though.
     
  6. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,652
    Likes:
    5,006
    Jaw, meet floor! Outstanding!

    Barb
     
  7. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,482
    Likes:
    35,013
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Please keep in mind this is the A Psychological A, not A Psychiatric A. I saw this in the original magazine page, which was advertised somewhere, maybe Co-Cure? We need these articles to keep being written every time there is major new research.
     
  8. Iquitos

    Iquitos Senior Member

    Messages:
    511
    Likes:
    966
    Colorado
    Thank goodness for Jason and Klimas! Boo to the PACE trial and all that B.S!
     
    Min, worldbackwards and xchocoholic like this.
  9. Snowdrop

    Snowdrop Rebel without a biscuit

    Messages:
    2,896
    Likes:
    10,089
    The first half of the article was wonderfully excellent.
    Too bad they didn't stop there.
    I know it was written for a psychology journal so I suppose I should expect psychology to enter into it. But it would have been better without the section 'treating the symptoms'.

    As always, I feel obliged to point out, this quote for example: (CBT) "Therapy helped me understand that I was not becoming depressed but becoming ill," she says.

    Isn't that lovely. Except she would not have thought that she was becoming depressed in the first place if it were not for Dr's disbelief in a biological cause and a mandate to refer us all to CBT for treatment. There would have been appropriate information available and if she sought out a Dr they would have been able to inform her that if it was CFS then it was biological. There would be no reason to seek CBT to rectify this mistake. The mistake she sought to rectify was a result of dysfunctional thinking of CBT adherents.

    This is what I would say to the wannabe helpful CBT purveyors.

    CBT. Why is this such a heavily promoted treatment protocol particularly given how much damage it has caused. Give us a break.
    Enough with the CBT and how good/helpful it is when properly handled. Everybody has a dysfunctional thought or two rolling around. Why focus on ME as a home for misguided thinking patterns.
    There is nothing specific about CBT that makes it specially suited to this illness and plenty about it that has done horrible abusive harm. Let it go already. Find some other illness to (more appropriately and delicately) use the wonder treatment that is CBT.

    For those of us fortunate enough to have friends and/or family we can talk to then they can help with any problems we have with coping. If not them then a priest, pastor, imam, rabbi, guru. If not them then there is PR here with a large community of people who understand and offer encouragement, :hug: and descriptions of what helped them.

    CBT can't even be classified as a form of communication. It is a 'talking at you', authoritarian, we don't need to know a thing about you, scripted, inflexible, not amenable to subtlety or nuance approach. When it helps remember that a stopped watch is right twice a day. Not to mention, all of the examples I've ever read about CBT being helpful are related to dealing with loss.
    So I'd call that grief counselling.

    There must be one heck of an investment in this (CBT) for it to be so important to keep the idea of CBT as this amazing resource alive despite it's rather large limitations in the overall treatment of the many symptoms of ME. Why keep badgering us with it despite that it's acknowledged that we have some major antipathy. Because you know so much better than we do that it is good for us?

    Holy Hubris Batman.
     
  10. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,947
    Likes:
    1,691
    Florida
    Thanks for the realistic viewpoint @Snowdrop. I see what you're saying about CBT vs finding a biological reason but like you said this is meant for psychiatric community.

    Overall, I found this very hopeful. Personally, seeing a therapist when I first became ill was very helpful. But seeing a caring informed doctor would've made therapy unnecessary.

    Imho. The very last sentence shows that Jason understands what needs to be done.

    "We as psychologists have a tremendous amount to contribute" to the CFS community, Jason says. "But it has to be an appropriate role. We can't further stigmatize these patients."

    I'd like to have seen OI mentioned as a symptom of ME/CFS in this article. I wonder where the author got his/her definition.

    Tc .. x
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  11. DanME

    DanME Senior Member

    Messages:
    286
    Likes:
    1,301
    I expected the worst and eventually read a very decent article! Bravo! It would have been nice, if they had mentioned Rituximab or some antivirals, but I am still surprised and intrigued.

    As for CBT. It is quite simple. It should have the same role, than in any other chronic or serious biological disease. It can help you cope and make some kind of peace with it (or better to establish a cease-fire). But hey, decent article nevertheless.
     
  12. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,138
    Likes:
    4,734
    Concord, NH
    Co-cure is still around? I tried to sign back up for emails, but could not even find the website!

    GG
     
  13. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,482
    Likes:
    35,013
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    I still get regular co-cure email updates. I am not sure why you cannot sign up.
     
  14. Roy S

    Roy S former DC ME/CFS lobbyist

    Messages:
    669
    Likes:
    1,405
    Illinois, USA
  15. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,020
    Psychotherapy should be an offer to help patients cope with symptoms of (any) presently incurable disease, it shouldn't be a cop-out.

    CBT is popular in academic circles because it is standardized, and therefore testable. It ins't necessarily the best form of psychotherapy for everyone. Personally, I prefer narrative or existential approaches, but some people may prefer the rigid structure of CBT.
     
    jimells likes this.
  16. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,482
    Likes:
    35,013
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Actually I do not think CBT is standardized, though you can create standardized treatment manuals for a given application, like the PACE trial. CBT is a very broad therapy.
     
  17. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

    Messages:
    765
    Likes:
    2,821
    Great article. It was OBJECTIVE.

    Well i agree i think CBT is much hyped today supposed to be good for almost everything. I don't believe a word of it. Maybe it is helpful for some problems( I don't know but let's allow for this possibility) but even then it is hard to believe that it is a magic cure for personal problems and issues.

    Lost your mother? Oh well don't be so depressed think some realistic/positive thoughts we will help you with that. CBT seems to view the patient as having a thought defect. Does this thought defect even exist or is it a reasonable response to certain circumstances? Does thinking differently about them change them?

    I disagree with that. I think they don't have much to contribute. An appropriate role would be to stay clear of serious biological illnesses.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
    jimells, Snowdrop and Iquitos like this.
  18. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,895
    Likes:
    12,702
    Sth Australia
    I wasnt game to go and read this article before I read the comments, but after treading the comments I think I will.. sounds interesting.
     
  19. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,895
    Likes:
    12,702
    Sth Australia
    That was a good balanced article, if we saw more like that things wouldnt be "as bad".
     
    Sean, Valentijn, Bob and 1 other person like this.
  20. worldbackwards

    worldbackwards A unique snowflake

    Messages:
    2,091
    Likes:
    10,358
    Earth
    I think I'd go for a mark of Cain.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page