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allergy to concrete

Discussion in 'Addressing Biotoxin, Chemical & Food Sensitivities' started by Cindi, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    Hi all

    I have a problem that I wish to discuss with you.One of the rooms at my flat was covered with wood. It was about 60 years old and I noticed some wet,rotten parts on it. I took all the wood off. Underneath,there was concrete.it was dusty and there was even some mold growth at some small parts. I had concrete floor cleaned many times. It looks nice and clean but when you walk on it,concrete breaks and some small dust comes out.Could not have time and energy to place new covering on it and decided to wait until summer for that.I covered it with some rugs.Problem is that I started having severe allergic reaction to this floor. I don't exactly know what the problem is,whether it is concrete or if there is still some mold on or in it or if it is the tiny dust that comes out when I walk on it. I really could not understand what is causing me the problem. I started having asthma type symptoms,running nose. It bothers me a lot.It is very difficult for me to live in this place.Do you have any idea on what type of allergy this could be and any tips on what to?Thanks so much.
     
  2. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

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    Cindi would it be possible for you to put a coat or two of non toxic varnish over the floor to stop the concrete dust from getting to you, may work if its only for a short time and you can get it fixed properly.
     
    taniaaust1 and Dreambirdie like this.
  3. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    great idea! Thanks. Will search that.
     
  4. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    I think maryb's idea might be a possible stop-gap measure. Or if you don't do well with varnish, you could get some sheets of vapor barrier to tape over the floor and throw rugs on top of that. But ultimately, my instincts tell me this floor has a major mold problem. Once mold gets into concrete, it's really pretty hard to get that out. I would consider moving if I were you.
     
    alex3619 likes this.
  5. john66

    john66 Senior Member

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    There is a brand of paint called drylock that is used for this purpose. Any home depot or lowes would have it, if you are in the US.
     
  6. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    Thanks so much. Your answer was so helpful.In fact,I don't feel well since I moved into this flat and I had always been wondering what the reason could be.I have couple of questions regarding this mold issue.I am extremely sensitive to mold.slightest amount of it is enough to make me ill but I am also sensitive to mold smell. I can get the smell as soon as I enter to any area.But I do not get much mold smell in this room.There was some,when I first took the wood out but I had the floor cleaned many times,than I had it washed with bleach and also sprayed hydrogen peroxide on it, So,now I do not get distinct mold smell. Even if it exists it may be minimal.The minimal smell tat might exist and my reaction do not fit to each other.Is it possible mold not to smell but still exist? Or is it mold toxins? Don't they smell?Also is there a way to understand if there is mold in concrete?There are no color changes,etc.Could it be inside the concrete and not on the surface? I am actually planning to move but that might be around spring or summer.Thanks so much.
     
    Dreambirdie likes this.
  7. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    Unfortunately i am not but i will search. Thanks so much !
     
  8. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    With this kind of thing, you really need to trust your body. Some molds smell more than others. The problem is that once you are sensitized to a certain toxin, then your body becomes more reactive to it. So instead of putting your energy into figuring out a way to understand the mold in the floor, I would try to figure out how to seal or cover it as best as you can for now, and then move as soon as you are able.
     
  9. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    I too think you need to cover this floor ASAP, it could make you very seriously sick quite fast. 60 year old concrete.. there could be anything mixed with that in the dust (chemicals that are now banned). It could be mold issue but maybe not. (My last hives outbreak was actually thou dust on concrete).

    There are non toxic vanishes which can be used on things. I have MCS and recently did some painting with non toxic paints and had to find non toxic vanish... I ended up finding one made from natural materials.

    The vanish/sealer I use is called "polyclear" by ecolour. http://www.ecolour.com.au/products/polyclear/ I know non toxic paints/sealers/vanishes are available everywhere thou if you search.

    "[​IMG]
    POLYCLEAR Hard Surface Sealer
    Timber and Concrete

    Polyclear is a unique and tough hard surface sealer that provides maximum protection. It has a clear, hard polyurethane type finish.
    The product has Zero VOC’s (volatile organic compounds) and is Certified Carbon Neutral.

    "
    ecolour paints have Zero Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) outgassing.
    They are completely non toxic and will not affect the quality of your indoor air
    whether home, office or commercial premises."
     
  10. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    Thank you so much dreambirdie and Taniaaust1.You were so helpful and supportive. Best wishes.
     
  11. Forebearance

    Forebearance Senior Member

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    I wish you the best, Cindi. It sounds like a really challenging situation.
    For me, once something has been exposed to the kinds of molds that make toxins, it is really difficult to rehabilitate. You can clean off the mold itself and the spores, too. But the toxins bond to surfaces and they don't wash off, unless it's a brief exposure.
     
  12. Cindi

    Cindi Senior Member

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    Thanks so much. Today i improved insulation of door of the room and will keep it closed. Meanwhile i am still searching various short term and long term options. I was also planning to move in spring or summer. Not sure if i will be able to do it but we will see how it goes. Thanks so much to all who have helped! You have been so supportive.Best wishes.
     

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