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Alkaline phosphatase maintains microbial balance

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, May 10, 2014.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Does anyone know how to increase alkaline phosphatase in the gut?

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509130046.htm

    Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified the mechanism by which an enzyme produced in the intestinal lining helps to maintain a healthy population of gastrointestinal microbes. In their report in American Journal of Physiology -- Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, the research team describes finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria by blocking the growth-inhibiting action of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -- an action first described in this paper -- within the intestine.

    "We found that ATP is a natural inhibitor of bacteria in our intestines and that IAP promotes the growth of 'good' bacteria by blocking ATP," says Richard Hodin, MD, of the MGH Department of Surgery, senior author of the report which has been released online. "By helping to keep these healthy bacteria happy, IAP protects us against dangerous pathogens that can get the upper hand when the balance is disrupted."

    The beneficial bacteria and other microbes that normally populate the human digestive system contribute to the digestive process and also prevent the proliferation of any disease-causing bacteria that may be present. A drop in the number of beneficial species -- which may be caused by antibiotic treatment, poor nutrition or other health conditions -- can allow the population of harmful bacteria to rise, contributing to serious medical problems including chronic diarrhea from pathogenic species such as C. difficile, inflammatory bowel disease, and metabolic syndrome.

    Previous research by Hodin's team found that IAP keeps pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract from passing through the intestinal wall, and a 2010 study in mice revealed that the enzyme plays an important role in maintaining levels of beneficial bacteria, including restoring levels reduced by antibiotic treatment. However, that study also showed that IAP does not directly promote bacterial growth, leaving exactly how the enzyme helps maintain the microbial population an open question that the current study was designed to investigate.

    A series of experiments first confirmed that mice lacking intestinal IAP had significant reductions in populations of several important bacterial species. Hypothesizing that IAP may act by blocking a growth-inhibiting activity of one of its target molecules, the researchers tested how well bacteria in stool samples would grow in the presence of four known IAP targets. Among the tested targets, only ATP significantly reduced bacterial growth; and ATP's inhibitory effects were reversed by application of IAP. Best known as the primary energy supply within cells, ATP also acts as a signaling molecule both inside and outside of cells, and this study is the first to identify such an activity for ATP within the gastrointestinal system.

    Experiments in living mice revealed that IAP knockout animals had 10 times the normal level of ATP within their intestines and that fasting animals, in which IAP levels would be expected to drop, also had elevated intestinal ATP. Adding ATP to the intestines of mice in which IAP activity had been inhibited reduced levels of beneficial E.coli bacteria in the animals' digestive systems. Altogether the results show that ATP inhibits the growth of intestinal bacteria in mice and that IAP's growth-promoting effects result from the enzyme's inactivation of ATP and possibly of related molecules.

    "Now we need to find out whether IAP also promotes the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria in humans," says Hodin, who is a professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. "If it does, IAP-based therapies could offer a simple and safe approach to treating the millions of patients who suffer serious health problems caused by disruptions to intestinal microbial balance."
     
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  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Hmmm. It is known that alk phos can be produced in response to bacterial endotoxins reaching the liver. I wonder if there is a connection?
     
  3. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    I don't know what it means but this chemical is used to test for Paget's disease. I have paget's of the skull which is why I know this. I still need to see a doc for this. Mine was dx via cat scan.

    I believe I read it's a marker for other diseases too.

    I don't know the details about this chemical but maybe we don't want to increase this.

    tc ... x
     
  4. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    The thing that jumped out at me was that there is increased ATP in the gut seems to be bad. A lot of us have various types of trouble with our gut and those of us who have had our population of critters tested have found problems.

    Could it be that in ME/CFS:
    1. something disrupted the normal population of gut microbes
    2. since increased ATP would either worsen or maintain the problem, the body lowers the level of ATP to try to correct the problem
    3. for some reason, the problem does not resolve, therefore lowered ATP continues
    4. at a set point, the continuing reduction in ATP starts to negatively affect many other things
    5. we get the symptoms we are all so familiar with ...

    Perhaps this is telling us that it really does start in the gut?
     
  5. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    The several times my alkaline phosphatase has been measured over the last 30 years, it has always been above the normal range.
     
  6. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    I'm not sure just how I happened on this particular site, but I was searching for info on butyrate. This is from a supplement manufacturer's website for one of their butyrate products [here] It says in part:

    "Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid (SCFA) Butyrate is made in the lower colon by bacteria and taken up by the colonocytes, the cells that line the colon. It then becomes an important food for those cells. Lacking good bacteria in our colon, such as when we take antibiotics, can lead to an insufficient supply of butyrate.

    Butyrate is used in a wide array of neurological disorders. The research reports its ability to elevate cellular enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase and insufficient sodium and chloride levels. "

    So it if I'm understanding this correctly, we want to:
    Supply and feed good gut bacteria,
    which will ... produce more butyrate,
    which will ... increase alkaline phosphatase,
    which will ... promote more good microbes.

    We seem to be stuck in the opposite cycle. I was toying with the idea of temporarily supplementing with butyrate while I worked on increasing the good microbes but decided to just focus on the bugs and let them do their jobs. Now I'm not so sure.
     
    July likes this.
  7. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Very interesting. Thank you. It's very difficult to draw solid conclusions for CFS. I think the only way is to begin with trial and error. Unless we know the true cause of CFS, we are not able to find treatments based on its actual origin, we just have to guess. Butyrate seems a valid option, since it comes along with several other health benefits. I wish we would know more.
     
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  8. Flower1978

    Flower1978

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    First thing that came into my mind was psilocybin. When i googled the two i saw something but i am not in the state to figure it all out and read englisch that way, but maybe its something??
     
  9. knackers323

    knackers323 Senior Member

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    any of you guys still around here?
     
  10. trails

    trails Senior Member

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    On the standard metabolic panel, my alkaline phosphatase levels have always been below the normal range.
     
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  11. knackers323

    knackers323 Senior Member

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    @trails was that intestinal alkaline phosphate?
     
  12. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Mine was measured via blood, FWIW.
     
  13. trails

    trails Senior Member

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    No, it was a blood test, and i have no idea if there's any relationship between intestinal alkaline phosphatase and blood levels.
     
  14. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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    Miyarisan should help in that case.
     

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