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Alfacalcidol. New treatment for MS fatigue

Discussion in 'Post-Exertional Malaise, Fatigue, and Crashes' started by beaverfury, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. beaverfury

    beaverfury beaverfury

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    West Australia
    The Multiple Sclerosis Journal recently published the results of a study by researchers from Israel who measured the effect of vitamin D analogue, Alfacalcidol, on MS-related fatigue. In this study, 158 MS patients with significant fatigue received Alfacalcidol or a placebo.

    The researchers found that Alfacalcidol is a safe and effective treatment for fatigue among patients with MS.

    These findings suggest that Alfacalcidol, a drug similar to vitamin D, should be considered a safe treatment option for MS-related fatigue.

    http://www.msif.org/news/2014/11/17/new-treatment-fatigue/


    I wonder if this would have any effect on me/cfs/seid related fatigue? I'm not feeling too well at the moment so haven't done enough googling to know what the fatigue relieving mechanism is in MS, or whether it would conceivably be of help in our ailment.

    http://www.neurologyreviews.com/ind...273649&cHash=86b83e79cc516cb710b7f8da19f0ea1b
     
  2. melihtas

    melihtas Senior Member

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    Istanbul Turkey
    I tried high dose Alfacacidol to raise my vitamin D levels. It worsened my orthostatic intolerance permenantly. Never recovered to where it was before.

    Sorry, my mistake. I used Colecalciferol not Alfacalcidol. Another form of vitamin D.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  3. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    14% of patients reported less "fatigue" with the drug when compared to the placebo group. Not exactly earth-shattering.
     
    SOC likes this.
  4. beaverfury

    beaverfury beaverfury

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    But good for that 14%.

    I'm clutching at straws, I know. Just more searching and speculation for something to improve my condition.

    Alfacalcidol has a weaker impact on calcium metabolism[1] and parathyroid hormone levels[2] than calcitriol, however alfacalcidiol has significant effects on the immune system, including regulatory T cells.[3

    The regulatory T cells (Tregs), formerly known as suppressor T cells, are a subpopulation of T cells which modulate the immune system, maintain tolerance to self-antigens, and abrogate autoimmune disease.
     
  5. beaverfury

    beaverfury beaverfury

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    'New research has also found chronic Lyme patients have higher amounts of Borrelia-specific FoxP3 than healthy controls, indicating regulatory T cells might also play a role, by immunosuppression, in the development of chronic Lyme disease.
    The culmination of these new and ongoing immunological studies suggests this cell-mediated immune disruption in the Lyme patient amplifies the inflammatory process, often rendering it chronic and self-perpetuating, regardless of whether the Borrelia bacterium is still present in the host, or in the absence of the inciting pathogen in an autoimmune pattern.'[108]- wiki Lyme disease microbiology

    I'm cutting and pasting deviously flimsy connections because I have a lot of time on my hands and no scientific conscience.

    No-one's reading my thread anyway :cry: because it doesn't have 'IOM' in the title. :rolleyes:
     
    RosieBee and SOC like this.

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