Phoenix Rising tells QMUL: release the PACE trial data
Mark Berry, Acting CEO of Phoenix Rising, presents the Board of Directors’ open letter to Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) urging them to release the PACE trial data, and hopes that other non-UK organisations will join British charities in the same request...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Adrenal Fatigue Link to Low Testosterone?

Discussion in 'Adrenal Dysfunction' started by dominover, Jan 18, 2016.

  1. dominover

    dominover

    Messages:
    41
    Likes:
    9
    I have a simple question surrounding fatigue and low testosterone.

    I have always thought that if you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, when the initial stages of fatigue set in (the hyper-cortisol stage), excess cortisol robs your body of DHEA (Dehydraepiandrosterone) used to produce testosterone. Thus, a hyper-cortisol state indirectly reduces testosterone.

    Having said this, I still see allot of articles on the web suggesting that Low Testosterone can lead to fatigue??

    My question is this: Is it both true that low testosterone can lead to fatigue and that fatigue can also lead to low testosterone?

    I can explain how fatigue leads to low T but not the other way around. Can anyone help? Thanks
     
  2. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes:
    11,821
    Mid-Ohio Valley, United States
    @dominover --

    I can at the very least attest that this is not a direct relationship, as my DHEA levels and cortisol levels are normal, while my free testosterone is super-low.

    Were you looking at this study?

    (Emphasis mine.)

    So while low testosterone is associated with hypercortisolism in men, the same is not said for women... at least not in this article anyway.

    Yep. At least indirectly, some of the endogenous compounds that cause fatigue also suppress the HPA axis.

    Ref:

    Craddock, T. J. A., Fritsch, P., Rice, M. A., del Rosario, R. M., Miller, D. B., Fletcher, M. A., … Broderick, G. (2014). A Role for Homeostatic Drive in the Perpetuation of Complex Chronic Illness: Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. PLoS ONE, 9(1), e84839. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084839
     
  3. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,027
    Most testosterone is made in the gonads, not the adrenals.
     
  4. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes:
    11,821
    Mid-Ohio Valley, United States
    @adreno - this is true, but the hypothalamus and pituitary are the ones send the signals to the gonads to produce testosterone.

    It might be a semantics thing... oddly, in the US we call it adrenal insufficiency even if the dysfunction is at the level of the hypothalamus or the pituitary rather than the adrenals.

    -J
     
  5. adreno

    adreno PR activist

    Messages:
    4,843
    Likes:
    11,027
    But since most testosterone isn't made from converting DHEA, but directly in the gonads, it doesn't matter much if DHEA is low. As stated in the OP.

    Both my cortisol and DHEA are low, but my testosterone very high.
     
  6. Lou

    Lou Senior Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes:
    433
    southeast US
    And it can be the other way, too. My DHEA was very high but testosterone on low side.
     
  7. Ellkaye

    Ellkaye

    Messages:
    163
    Likes:
    158
    It can be tested in the blood.
    I think it s best to get tested a few times
    These things can be indefinite
     
  8. dominover

    dominover

    Messages:
    41
    Likes:
    9
    Thanks everyone, I've been away from my computer for some time so haven't had the chance to respond properly. Thanks for all the help.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page