The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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Adenosine triphosphate vs. Adenosylcobalamin as supplements

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Peyt, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    Would any one care to educate me regarding these two supplements?
    I understand that Adenosine Triphosphate is the building blocks of energy, but does the Adenosine in that combination come from Adenosycobalamin?
    And if yes, is this why people who suffer from low B12 have low energy?
    and if yes, can a person with B12 deficiency take Adenosine Triphosphate and get the same benefits as taking Adenosylcobalamin?

    Thanks very much
     
  2. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Peyt likes this.
  3. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    I also sent additional material to your inbox. Please let us know what you find out!
     
  4. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    I just found this post from Aug/15/2012 :

    Hi, exchoc.
    Adenosylcobalamin is used in the mitochondria, especially in the muscle cells. It acts as a coenzyme for the methylmalonate pathway. This pathway is used to feed several fuels into the Krebs cycle, to support making ATP by the mitochondrial. ATP supplies the energy to drive muscle contraction. Some of the fuels involved are several of the amino acids, propionate, and the odd-chain fatty acids.
    This pathway feeds the fuels in at succinyl CoA, which is downstream of the partial block at aconitase, which limits the use of carbs and fats for fuel in ME/CFS. So boosting adenosyl B12 can make a big difference in this disorder.
    In the simplified methylation protocol, hydroxo B12 is used, and the cells can normally convert it to both methyl B12 and adenosyl B12, but these processes can be slow if glutathione is badly depleted. In this case, adding adenosyl B12, as Freddd does in his protocol, can make a beneficial difference.
    Best regards,
    Rich
     
    Silverlining likes this.

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