Lipkin's Monster ME/CFS Study: Microbes, Immunity & Big Data
The Microbe Discovery Project outlines an ambitious new study by top researchers that has collected patient samples, but needs desperately funds to complete the work.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Adeno B12 and transulfuration pathway

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by skyebean, Mar 29, 2015.

  1. skyebean

    skyebean

    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    15
    California
    @caledonia @ahmo @Freddd

    Last Friday I put my 23andme results through Sterling's app, and got a ton of new info - most of which I don't know what to do with (but I'm researching). There are a few pages of these charts at the end of the report, and this one is for the transulfuration pathway. What I found to be really interesting is that it says that one of the co-factors for this pathway is adeno-b12. I am starting to explore Fredd's information more, and have been feeling called to try the adeno-b12. I have really been struggling with the transulfuration pathway, and what I have been trying hasn't been clearing it. I'm wondering if the adeno b12 is what allows people to tolerate higher amounts of methylfolate.... (I apologize, Fredd, if you've already posted about this somewhere...I'm navigating the forums the best I can :) )

    I haven't seen any information anywhere about adeno b12 and the transulfuration pathway... Has anyone else?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 1, 2015
  2. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,340
    Likes:
    6,526
    Northcoast NSW, Australia
    @skyebean Sorry, I don't know the answer. AdB12 relates to ATP. That's about the extent of my understanding. Here's a post that's related to sulfate-reducing bacteria, w/ a number of links. I don't know if it has anything useful to you, but maybe the poster is clued in on transsulfuration. There are a number of threads dealing w/ sulfur, w/ numerous contributions by @aaron_c . In terms of clearing sulfur, I've had terrific results with malic acid.
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  3. caledonia

    caledonia

    Messages:
    4,203
    Likes:
    3,223
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    @skyebean, that's new information to me.
     
  4. skyebean

    skyebean

    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    15
    California
    @ahmo, thank you for pointing me toward aaron_c. What brand of malic acid were you taking? is that a form of magnesium? I was taking magnesium malate for awhile, and it said it had malic acid in it... What dose were you taking?
     
  5. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,340
    Likes:
    6,526
    Northcoast NSW, Australia
    I also take mag malate, nature's Sunshine. Source naturals makes malic acid caps. I'm gettin mine bulk from someone who sells body building supps. I'm tending to use 1/2 tb in footbaths or enemas. I'm not taking it orally. Aaron initially brought malic acid to attention in this thread.
     
  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,281
    Likes:
    45,811
    Sterling's diagram is not helpful. MethylB12 is used in the methylation cycle. No other form of B12 is used in it unless it is converted into methylB12 first. The transsulfuration pathway originates from the methylation cycle, and is a way in which excess homocysteine is removed and used in eventually forming glutathione.

    They are trying to tie in the transsulfuration pathway with the Citric Acid Cycle, where adenoB12 is used, but the connection is pretty tenuous, not direct or substantial. And it's moving in one direction, so while adenoB12 is being used in the Citric Acid Cycle, that's not somehow moving back up the chain to do anything to the transsulfuration pathway.

    Based on their CBS comments on that diagram, Sterling can be added to my list of Yasko-Regurgitating Dumbasses. CBS C699T has never been shown to be associated with high ammonia or any other health problems. Whereas people with the -/- version have a slightly elevated chance of real diseases, based on real research :rolleyes: And their claim of low glutathione resulting from CBS +/+ is nonsensical and totally backwards. It's basic stuff, and they're getting it completely wrong.
     
    xks201 likes this.
  7. skyebean

    skyebean

    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    15
    California
    okay @Valentijn, now I'm researching the citric acid cycle. I'm not worried about glutathione, but about why I'm so intolerant to methyl donors when they do me so much good. I was able to take higher doses of supps (especially TMG) when I started the process, though I'm feeling much better now. Niacin has worked less and less as I've gone forward, and my overmethylation 'jags' (or whatever it is) seem to be getting more and more intense....I've gotten to a place where I have found a nice balance, but recently I had a horrible reaction to poison oak, and used lots of prescription strength hydrocortisone cream which knocked me out of whack again really hard. I'm just finding my way back into balance with my supps right now, and trying to figure out what to tweak to get past so that I'm not riding such an edge. I'm still trying the adeno b12 (I have no bad reactions to b12 so far), and maybe that will help (though I have no idea why Fredd recommends it.....researching).

    Thank you for your reply
     
  8. skyebean

    skyebean

    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    15
    California
    ohhhh.... Kreb's cycle...
     
  9. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

    Messages:
    713
    Likes:
    290
    Same thing
     
  10. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

    Messages:
    713
    Likes:
    290
    What part of the citric acid cycle is it used if you know?
     
  11. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,281
    Likes:
    45,811
    It's a cofactor in transforming Methylmalonyl-CoA into Succinyl-CoA.
     
    xks201 likes this.
  12. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

    Messages:
    713
    Likes:
    290
    What do you make of this study? Says adenosylcobalamin didn't make it into the mitochondria and I have seen other studies showing this. Perhaps it's only in certain mutations where supplemental adenob12 doesn't make it into mito?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6434828
     
  13. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,281
    Likes:
    45,811
    That's a case study of a single patient who has a pathogenic mutation on the MMAB gene. That gene transforms B12 into adenosylB12. So that's a very uncommon problem, and the vast majority of people have no problem transforming other forms of B12 into adenosylB12. The forms which are being discussed there are quite severe and become extremely apparent shortly after birth.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page