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Acetyl-glutathione anyone?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by hixxy, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, hixxy.

    I appreciate your giving it a try. Sorry that it didn't pay off for you. You are only the second person I've heard from who has tried it. The other person was in Germany, and the report was that it did raise the intracellular glutathione level. So I don't know what to conclude about it yet.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  2. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    I tried some acetyl glut this past weekend, and my experience was not good. It either 1) caused a major detox, or 2) failed to clear the detox that some other unknown thing had caused. Either way, I give it an F on its performance.

    I would love to continue on my TD-glutathione, which works very well... and maybe I will, in spite of the nasty rash I keep getting from the cream. :(
  3. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Thanks, DB. Sorry that it was not a smash hit!

    Rich
  4. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    It was a smash-hit of the WRONG kind! hehehe
  5. jenbooks

    jenbooks Guest

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    DB--what's in the cream that gives you a nasty rash? I was going to order it.
  6. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    I don't know. I did fine with it for about 6 months, and then I began having skin irritation and really bad itching about 2-3 days after I had applied the cream, with a subsequent rash that can last up to 2 weeks.

    I talked to the pharmacist at Lee Silsby, and he thought I would do better with another version of cream, that is for hyper-sensitive people, but that has made no difference.

    What I am wondering is... could the irritation and rash possibly be the result of toxins coming out through my skin?
    Hey Rich, or anyone else who's had experience with the TD-glutathione, what do you think about that?
  7. hixxy

    hixxy Woof woof

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    Ask them what base it's made with. The TD gluthione I use is a liposomal cream made with vegetable glycerin, isopropyl palmitate (a fatty acid), lecithin and glutathione only. They don't use a 'base' at all. The only other base I come close to tolerating is called a DK base. That was all they told me. Unfortunately the smell of TD glutathione does me in (MCS).
  8. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Someone in another thread mentioned having success with acetyl glutathione although I think I've heard one or two others who didn't receive benefit from it. I haven't tried it myself since it's kind of pricey and I want to focus on other methods of raising Glutathione besides taking it directly since some people have raised some questions about its efficacy. I use the Source Naturals sublingual myself. It's not a huge dose, but it's reasonably priced and includes 140 mcg Molybdenum in each tablet which is also good for raising glutathione. Here's the post about the Acetyl Glutathione.

  9. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Anyone else try both liposomal/lipoceutical glutathione and acety glutathione?
  10. dbkita

    dbkita Senior Member

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    It is ironic for me since I tried liposomal glutathione for years (spent a lot of money) but in 2010 my whole blood glutathione levels were some of the lowest Rich Vank had ever seen (private communication). I spent months on IV glutathione but while this probably was nice for my kidneys and liver, it did squat for the rest of me (except drive my glutamate and cysteine levels up even higher). The problem is glutathione must be disassociated to enter the cells and re-assembled inside.

    In my case it was the inability of my body to make glutathione from glutamate and cysteine (the rate-limiting GCL step) as Rich Vank suggested. The fix for me was a combo of vitamin C for antioxidant protection and glutathione recycling, but more important was improving my ATP status (still a work in progress but improved).

    So my only caution is if someone has high glutamate and cysteine (and reasonable glycine) levels but their glutathione levels are really low, then dependent on their immune system status (infection, stress, autoimmune disease) and their ATP production / recycling capabilities, the glutathione supplementation may only help some ...

    Personally I think the people on here who claim glutathione itself is harmful are mistaking the glutathione as the culprit but miss the fact that if it disassociates and cannot be re-assembled you are feeding in glutamate and cysteine at various levels (high if done in IV). These can cause their own wonderful neurological problems for sure.
    August59 likes this.
  11. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Since Glutathione can break down into Cysteine, it might not be a good idea to take for someone with mercury because mercury can block the utilization of cysteine resulting in elevated cysteine levels. Rich discusses this in an article he wrote about glutathione supplementation. Since the article he says methylation is the preferred method of raising glutathione.
    http://phoenixrising.me/treating-cf...atigue-syndrome-mecfs-by-rich-van-konynenburg
  12. dbkita

    dbkita Senior Member

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    Hi Lotus97,

    I am just curious you have been posting a lot of late in regards to mercury. Have you been able to assess your mercury levels? It is really hard to make a true diagnosis let alone a self-diagnosis for metals without some sort of lab results. Remember true mercury poisoning has lots of nasty abnormal neurological and mental factors.

    For some people I would agrees that glutathione supplementation can be a problem but that would include far more cases than just mercury toxification. But being able to make your own glutathione is huge. For those of us with immune system dysregulation (which probably way more on these boards than people give credit for) let alone autoimmune diseases (which really suck btw), glutathione production is really, really, really important.

    And I am sorry here I disagree with Rich Vank the DMSA challenge test from Doctor's Data or similar are highly suspect as to actually correlating with real results. While false negative results are low, the false positive rates are not. I would much prefer a RBC test then followed up by a hair analysis. But that is just me.
  13. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I posted that quote mainly because of the risk of elevated cysteine levels for people with mercury and that glutathione breaks down into cysteine. In another post, Rich said he believes that a lot of PWCs have mercury issues which is why I shared the quote about cysteine and mercury, but do you think he's wrong that a lot of people here have mercury issues? Also, is Acetyl Glutathione just as likely to break down into cysteine, glutamine, and glycine or is it different than other forms of glutathione?

    What are the causes of immune system dysregulation? In Rich's papers about methylation and glutathion depletion he does say that viruses and coinfections are a common cause of CFS, but I assume you are referring to more than just that.

    No, I haven't found out any more information about my own situation. I know self-diagnosis is a bad idea in general when it comes to health, but I haven't found doctors to be that helpful either. My dentist told me not to worry about mercury after my tooth with an amalgam cracked. As I mentioned in another thread I started methylfolate right after my tooth cracked so it's impossible to know how much the mercury was responsible for my symptoms. My guess is that I wasn't exposed to a lot of mercury or my symptoms would be much more severe, but I'm being cautious until I find out more information. After reading that information by Rich about cysteine I stopped taking NAC. I would like to be able to take NAC and Alpha Lipoic Acid again because those are supposed to be good ways for raising glutathione and they're a lot cheaper than Acetyl Glutathione. I think my adrenals are the most likely culprit for my symptoms and that's the one thing I actually was tested on.
  14. dbkita

    dbkita Senior Member

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    Understood.

    If you think methylfolate was a culprit and you have been off it for a while and still have symptoms then it is not the methylfolate since it will not last long in your body.

    Most of the people who have issues with NAC have them for reasons having nothing to do with mercury. Many have trans-sulfuration issues or problems with sulfur in general.

    Personally I have found R-ALA to be indispensable. It is way better than regular ALA. And R-ALA has no observable impact on my my urine sulfate levels.
  15. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    My symptoms did improve after I stopped methylfolate, but then came back when I started taking B12 sublingually. There were about 5 days of my B12 usage where I was taking 800 mcg of folinic acid, but they continued after I stopped the folinic. The only B12 I was taking when I was taking the methylfolate was 200 mcg of methylcobalamin orally. I don't think that's enough to do much (although you might have noticed my post about that Thorne mb12 oral supplement) unless it was the combination of B12 and methylfolate. I was taking the 200 mcg of mb12 for a year without any problems though. Part of the problem is I don't know how much methylfolate I was taking because it doesn't say on the B complex (Jarrow's B Right). I decided I'm going to start taking methylfolate again which is in a Thorne b complex. I'm also going to lower the dose of B12 as I raise the dosage of methylfolate. The B complex has a high amount of Niacinamide which will hopefully prevent overmethylation. I still think it's possible that my exposure to mercury is why I'm reacting strongly to the B12 and folate. This is sort of a controversy in these forums which I don't expect to be resolved any time soon. I'm trying to keep an open mind about things.

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