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Accumulation of Heavy Metals in People on a Gluten-Free Diet

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by TrixieStix, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    One of the problems with arsenic is its used in wood preservatives for commercial use. This sometimes occurs on wooden palings and other structures on farms. From there it can leach into the soil.
     
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I am currently experimenting with grains other than rice, including buckwheat and quinoa.
     
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  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    A huge percentage of the world population, probably billions, eat white rice as a staple part of their diet. While some regions have had heavy metal poisoning due to local conditions, the issue does not appear to be widespread. However I am mindful that this might be because its simply not tested for. These regions tend to be poor.
     
  4. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @alex3619
    re wheat, I avoid it because a) it seems to make things worse, and b) I understand that gliadins increases paracellular permeability.

    But when choosing a replacement you may also want to consider the problem of acellular carbohydrates. https://www.dovepress.com/compariso...ular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO

    This may be why some people report doing better with bread made from home ground flour or pumpernickel (which is made from whole and cracked but not ground grains).

    Just about the only grains I am eating are fermented (I had a heavy course of antibiotics back in december and have been fermenting whole or almost whole cooked grains and legumes (buckwheat, rice, sorghum, lentils, adzuki, mung) in a yoghurt maker with probiotics. And I expect that this will be a temporary measure.

    I do eat brown rice occasionally and I occasionally buy pumpernickel, when I really desire some rye. But these days the place that would have once been occupied by rice or pasta is most often taken up by legumes and or other vegetables. But this does remove the possibility of a really easy meal like a sandwich or sardines on toast.
     
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  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I can eat many legumes, but I react to lentils even worse than I do to wheat or corn.
     
  6. Timaca

    Timaca Senior Member

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    I eat a lot of rice because it is the only grain I can eat. Wheat, corn, oats, quinoa, buckwheat all give me issues of various kinds. (Seems like alex3619 have similar issues....at least with regard to wheat and corn!)

    I soak my rice overnight (including my rice cereal). I drain it and cook it in fresh water. I hope that gets rid of some of the arsenic. I use Lundberg's rice.

    I have not had my arsenic levels tested. I may ask my doctor about that at my next appt. I have had my mercury levels tested and they were quite high. But I was eating a fair amount of salmon. I stopped eating fish and my levels dropped to normal.

    Best,
     
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  7. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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  8. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @alex3619 lentils contain wheat germ agglutinin. And I have issues with them too, unless they are fermented or sprouted.

    I do the soak and ferment thing for all my legumes. So the porridge grains are soaked and fermented in clean water for a day or two, then drained washed, cooked and fermented for two days with probiotic cultures in a yoghurt maker.

    Legumes are generally fermented in salt water for 3 days in summer longer in winter before being pressure steamed. I also sprout lentils and chickpeas if I have the energy - not recently.
     
    TrixieStix likes this.
  9. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @ahmo
    from the paper that paleomom references http://file.scirp.org/pdf/FNS_2013011516575568.pdf (which I have only glanced through) it would seem that teff, quinoa, amaranth, sorghum, buckwheat, hemp and sesame would be the best bets.

    But this is about allergic responses. We have three issues: the way that dysbiosis and acellular carbs cause a breakdown of the mucosal layer: the way that gliadin and other pro permeability factors increase permeability; and then the presentation of pood particles to the immune system.

    My approach taking heavily from john bagnulo , has been to try to stick to cellular carbs, take plently of anti permeability agents and avoiding pro permeability agents, and avoid anything that I know makes me feel worse.

    And thanks for the link, I read it about two years ago and had completely forgotten about this crossreactivity issue. I wil have to get some of the better grains if I continue with the porridges.
     
  10. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    I have been having a small amount of sorghum thins everyday. Apparently this is another ancient grain and although I have problems with wheat and probably gluten too I do fine with this grain. Its full of soluble fibre and tastes good too. I put butter on them and top with some cream cheese and/or grated cheese on top but they are also good with peanut butter. Great for breakfast.

    Pam
     
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  11. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    On a recent edition of the BBC TV programme called Trust Me I Am A Doctor they got a UK Research Lab to test for arsenic in rice and they were amazed how high the levels were when cooked in the traditional way. However if one added a very large amount of water this cut the amount of residue arsenic right down.

    On their website which is www.bbc.co.uk/trustme there are the full details and from memory I think it was the last programme in the last series.

    Pam
     
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  12. adreno

    adreno Learned helplessness

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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3946282/
     
  13. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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  14. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Interestingly sweet potatoes cause instant joint pain in both my husband and myself. This week I just retried taro and had the same reaction, despite peeling, slicing thinly and boiling for 21 min. It tasted delicious though :rolleyes:
     
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  15. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member

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    I also watched this programme. My partner has started soaking rice ahead of time, then rinsing and cooking normally, if we know we're planning to have it as a side. We also tried cooking in lots of water, but this isn't a good cooking technique. Usually we use the 2:1 water:rice bring to boil then turn off heat with lid on method. IIRC basmati rice had the lowest arsenic.

    It is an excellent example of how when you change one thing there's a load of unintended consequences. On the evening I watched it I realised that I'd eaten rice every meal that day while avoiding gluten. It's even made me consider trying gluten again (my ability to digest gluten seems to fluctuate).

    The other thing is, do we get much energy from grains anyway as pwme? :angel:I try to cut down carbs, but the quantity always creeps back up again:devil:. It is hard to feel satisfied with no grains.

    Yesterday I had a hot cross bun (gluten free so likely containing added arsenic!) but it tasted lovely and I'll probably eat one again today. :p
     
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  16. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member

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    I react to lentils with that stinging/swelling lips sensation. For some reason other people (who'd eat with me, not humans in general ;)) are dismissive and reluctant to believe I react to lentils. I googled and lentil allergy is 2nd most common, in countries where babies are weaned on lentils. I was a 1970s baby so I was weaned on hippy lentil concoctions!

    I've actually never had an allergy test done. I probably should.
     
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  17. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

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    I haven't eaten rice for years or pasta or any high carb food as I don't feel good at all when I have eaten any of those foods. I do much better with low glycemic vegetables plus fats and protein.

    The only grain I have is either half a piece of gluten free toast for breakfast plus fats and protein or 1 1/2 Sorghum thins instead. I do well with some peanuts and cashews as snacks though and really look forward to a small snack.

    Pam
     
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  18. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @Jenny TipsforME what gets me is that people think that their opinions on such things matter. What does it say of their view of the world that they think that they are the ones who get to assess your responses to food - or music or art or whatever - to determine their validity. Not you, no what would you know. Talk about inflated egos.
     
  19. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member

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    @Richard7 I think the lentils thing is a bit like the straw breaking the back. They're happy to go along with no gluten, no lactose, low carb, high protein but add in no lentils too and it's too much to accommodate. Bear in mind that I'm not physically well enough to cook proper meals for myself.

    But if I say I get allergy symptoms it's because I do and allergies can go all exponential and cause havoc.
     
  20. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @Jenny TipsforME
    Ok, I did not realise they were cooking for you. I assumed it was kind of like the way that journalists roll their eyes (in print, but you know what I mean) at gluten free, or people's choices in clothes or whatever. The way that the adopt the position that anyone who is not exactly like them is some sort of poser.

    And I accept that its an allergy, and that its an allergy whether I accept it or not, I just think that one does not need to have a proven allergic reaction to something to decide not to eat it.
     
    Jenny TipsforME likes this.

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