The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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A Prospective Study of Infectious Mononucleosis in College Students

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Kati, Jan 26, 2017.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    A Prospective Study of Infectious Mononucleosis in College Students

    Leonard A. Jason1*, Ben Katz2, Kristen Gleason1, Stephanie McManimen1, Madison Sunnquist1 and Taylor orpe1

    Abstract

    Background: The present study aims to prospectively investigate possible biological and psychological factors present in college students who will go on to develop chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) following Infectious Mononucleosis (IM). Identi cation of risk factors predisposing patients towards developing CFS may help to understand the underlying mechanisms and ultimately prevent its occurrence. Our study is enrolling healthy college students over the age of 18. Enrollment began in March of 2013 and is ongoing.

    Methods: Biological and psychological data are collected when students are well (Stage 1), when they develop IM (Stage 2), and approximately 6 months after IM diagnosis (Stage 3).

    Results: Two case studies demonstrate the progression of student symptomology across all three stages.

    Conclusion: The Case Studies presented illustrate the usefulness of a prospective research design that tracks healthy students, following their trajectory of IM illness to either a) full recovery or b) diagnosis with CFS.
     
    AndyPR, Murph, Hutan and 2 others like this.
  2. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member

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    Prospective study :thumbsup:

    I've seen research capture students getting ill with mono, but great idea to get them when they're healthy.

    Interesting that the ME/CFS had some very mild symptoms initially (so not actually fully healthy). Also interesting that on this is does look like mono that doesn't improve. That was my experience, took me ages to think "this probably isn't glandular fever anymore ".
     
    A.B. and Esther12 like this.
  3. Murph

    Murph :)

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    Six months afterward is okay, but six years might be better. Six months after onset I was back at it, feeling great and back to my old lifestyle.

    Thereafter began a long slow decline. And I think I recall reading somewhere that that is not an unusual presentation at all.
     
  4. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member

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    @Murph in theory this would be good but it would be practically a lot harder. It sounds like in this study they get the base results in their first year at uni and then the follow ups are also while they're at uni, and they have a sort of captive cohort because the students have to contribute to research (I had to take part in other people's research at uni). Following up people around 6 years later would be much harder, though it could be worth doing.

    It may be they plan to do this but this write up is only preliminary.
     
    Murph likes this.

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