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A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

Discussion in 'Gastrointestinal and Urinary' started by lansbergen, Jun 6, 2010.

  1. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Dr Vernon talking about metagenome and forum members talking about bowel maybe this can come in handy.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v464/n7285/full/nature08821.html

    > Full Text Article

    Nature 464, 59-65 (4 March 2010) | doi:10.1038/nature08821; Received 14 August 2009; Accepted 23 December 2009

    A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing
  2. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Thanks ... I'm still waking up but I pulled this in from that article. Does this say that ATP production is the result of bacteria ?

  3. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    "We found two types of functions among the range clusters: those required in all bacteria (housekeeping) and those potentially specific for the gut. Among many examples of the first category are the functions that are part of main metabolic pathways (for example, central carbon metabolism, amino acid synthesis), and important protein complexes (RNA and DNA polymerase, ATP synthase, general secretory apparatus). Not surprisingly, projection of the range clusters on the KEGG metabolic pathways gives a highly integrated picture of the global gut cell metabolism (Fig. 6a)."

    No, I think they say ATP synthese is a function of the main metabolic pathways of the bacteria.

    Do you know that:
    It is generally agreed that certain organelles of the eukaryotic cell, especially mitochondria and plastids such as chloroplasts, originated as bacterial endosymbionts.

    Mitochondria have many features in common with prokaryotes. As a result, they are believed to be originally derived from endosymbiotic prokaryotes.
  4. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    I actually saw that the other day. You may be interested in this thread where parasites and worms are discussed.

    http://www.glutenfreeandbeyond.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4230&highlight=

    FWIW. The idea that certain bacteria were necessary for certain bodily functions first caught my attention when I learned that people with kidney stones were lacking in the bacteria o.forminges. Later, I learned that this isn't something that labs can produce so it has to be happening in our bodies. I think there's a link to lactobaccillus but can't swear to it.
  5. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Of the known fraction, about 5% codes for (pro)phage-related proteins, implying a universal presence and possible important ecological role of bacteriophages in gut homeostasis.


    A bacteriophage is any one of a number of viruses that infect bacteria.
    Bacteriophages are among the most common biological entities on Earth.

    Bacteriophage (phage) are obligate intracellular parasites that multiply inside bacteria by making use of some or all of the host biosynthetic machinery (i.e., viruses that infect bacteria.).

    There are many similarities between bacteriophages and animal cell viruses. Thus, bacteriophage can be viewed as model systems for animal cell viruses. In addition a knowledge of the life cycle of bacteriophage is necessary to understand one of the mechanisms by which bacterial genes can be transferred from one bacterium to another.

    General Information about Bacteriophages http://www.phages.org/PhageInfo.html
  6. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Does this mean that when we kill off certain bacteria that those viruses are killed off too ? Or do they move on to another host ?
  7. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Bacteriophages are very specific, targeting only one or a few strains of bacteria.

    Most phages are cleared very rapidly by the reticuloendothelial system if they don't quickly find a bacterial host in which to multiply

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reticuloendothelial_system

    http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v22/n1/full/nbt0104-31.html

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A471575

    http://textbookofbacteriology.net/phage.html

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