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90% cured from bed bound with Histrelief / Histame / Daosin

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by xlynx, May 26, 2011.

  1. xlynx

    xlynx Senior Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I would like to let everyone know about something that has worked well for me for the past 6 months.

    I am aware that everyone on this forum has very different needs and I think after having been a member for over a year I know I have tried protocols that worked for others that didnt work for me but this is something that has really worked for me.

    It has worked so well I am actually in amazement. After having had tried every supplement (almost :D ) out there I want to share this with anyone that may have similar symptoms to me.

    My main symptoms are:

    Anxiety, palpitations, extreme fatigue, confusion, inflammation, dizziness and air hunger. At my worst I was bed bound / wheel chair bound for a year and a half.

    The most obvious reactions I have had are to B12 (within 30 mins of ingesting I can be completely wiped out for hours) although I could tolerate it initially (for a few months until the reactions started) and can react to different foods at different times but nothing consistent. I did even manage to build up some tolerance to B12 but was always detrimental to me (although I am aware other have had great success with this and don't wish to undermine this treatment at all).

    By taking histrelief or Daosin (histame in the US) has given me a 90% recovery.

    Taking this product has had a very obvious effect quickly. I could tell from my first week that something was happening (it did take 3 months to see the full effect but was obvious for me the whole way through).

    I was diagnosed by Dirk Budka (to whom I am forever grateful, I am in london!).

    The key difference I have noticed between histrelief (is in patient trial stage only) and daosin (available online) is that histrelief seems to have a much more long term effect where as daosin is very much just for the small period in which you take it before a meal but still works well.

    Before becoming ill I suffered for several years with my intestines and stomach and so I always felt that my illness stemmed from my digestive system. As my illness progressed it was very hard to tell what was causing it as I had so many symptoms I started to believe it could be anything even psychological.

    ;)
    Abha, Critterina, Wayne and 1 other person like this.
  2. leaves

    leaves Senior Member

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    did you get tested for mastocystosis?
  3. TheMoonIsBlue

    TheMoonIsBlue Senior Member

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    Interesting! Glad you're feeling better. I may have to look into this product. Iherb sells it. Very reasonably priced also.

    I notice it does contain a Porcine ingredient.....just an FYI for anyone who may have a sensitivity.
  4. markmc20001

    markmc20001 Guest

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    Great news. Have you had any tests to determine what kinds of infections you may have? Think I have CPN. MAybe LYME, and probably a couple other viruses.

    Were you taking anything else? or just Daosin?
  5. xlynx

    xlynx Senior Member

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    leaves
    I dont have mastocystosis but I do have a low diamine oxidase level and should have probably mentioned this in my initial post. :)

    TheMoonIsBlue
    Thanks, true iherb has a great deal at the mo :)

    markmc20001
    I have had so many test and most showed not alot, other than gut disbiosis, candida (although anti fungals didnt help me at all) and possible being a hypo methylator. I actually had to stop taking quite a few supplements due to intolerance, I now take coq10 and vitamin c with quercitine. I am thinking about taking l-methionine but haven't tried it yet.
  6. leaves

    leaves Senior Member

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    oh interesting. for this enzyme you need the active b6 (p5p) and the active riboflavin-phosphate. Possible that you have some trouble converging the inactives into the actives..
    might be worth trying to supplement with the actives and see what happens..
    anyway CONGRATS!! lets hope it lasts!

    eta ; source naturals sells a sublingual wth coenzymated b2
    Critterina likes this.
  7. TheMoonIsBlue

    TheMoonIsBlue Senior Member

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    Hi, I gather all of diamine oxidase products like Histame are made from Pork? I had a bad reaction to Pancreatic Enzymes (animal derived) so I wonder if I'd have the same reaction. I take vegetarian enzymes (plant based) right now. Just thinking out loud LOL......
  8. markmc20001

    markmc20001 Guest

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    Ok thanks.

    If you are 90%, maybe enjoy it for awhile before changing anything? I made the mistake of feeling good then adding something else (EDTA) which made me crash and burn. :(
  9. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    xlynx - in theory if excess histamine is the issue, would any anti-histamine such as anti allergy medication provide some form of relief (just for a quick check without testing) or does it have to be the specific Daosin complex to reduce those excess histamines?
  10. xlynx

    xlynx Senior Member

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    leaves
    thanks, that nice to know I have taken B6 before without problems I might try that again as p5p.

    TheMoonIsBlue
    interesting I had not realized all were from pork although it does quite clearly say it on daosin.

    markmc20001
    I know it just feels like such a dangerous game to change the supplements sometimes, I am quite fortunate in that I seem to be somewhat stable at the moment (I hope it continues!)

    @melsiter
    I have tried over the counter hayfever type anti-histmaines without any effect, I also gather that quercitine is a power anti histamine but does not have enough effect for me alone. From my understanding there are four types of histamine receptors H1 through to H4 and different anti histamines work on different types of receptors.
  11. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi,all.

    Note that diamine oxidase requires copper as well as active B6 (which requires B2 for conversion). Also. please note that antihistamines do not lower histamine. They block histamine receptors. There are at least three types of histamine receptors. Benadryl and other common antihistamines for allergies block type 1. The older remedies for acid reflux such as Tagamet (cimetidine) and Zantac, which are now sold over the counter, are type 2 histamine blockers. There are type 3 receptors in the brain. Diamine oxidase (and Daosin) actually breaks down histamine.

    Best regards,

    Rich
    merylg likes this.
  12. xlynx

    xlynx Senior Member

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    Hi Rich, thanks for the info on that post, I have heard that B12 reduces the amount of Diamine Oxidase in the body is that true?

    Thanks, J
  13. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Yes I remember now the H2 blockers such ad famotidine - they were working better than PPIs although they were supposed to be less effective and although I never thought my stomach acid was an issue. Could hint to Histamine overload as a masked problem - will give diamine oxidase a try - thanks!
  14. leaves

    leaves Senior Member

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    Rich do you think that active b2 is stable when you swallow it, or should one take a sublingual?
  15. leela

    leela Slow But Hopeful

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    I've been searching regularly for about a year for a vegetarian version of DAO to no avail.
    If anyone knows of one, or hears of one, please let us know!
  16. globalpilot

    globalpilot Senior Member

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    Very interesting. Where did you get teh diamine oxidase test perfomred and what led you to do this test ?

    have your gut issues improved at all ?

    GP

  17. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Coenzyme B2 dephosphorylation in the gut

    Hi, leaves.

    I'm guessing that you are referring to FMN. (There are two active coenzyme forms of vitamin B2, i.e. FMN and FAD. FAD is not available as a supplement in the U.S., but it is available in Japan as a prescription, and I think it's also available in Scandanavia and in Russia.)

    In rats (see below) and presumably also in humans, both the active forms of riboflavin are dephosphorylated in the gut before absorption, so if there is a deficiency in flavokinase, it would be a good idea to take sublingual FMN. If there is a deficiency in FAD synthetase (I have encountered one person with this, but it is pretty rare, I think) then prescription sublingual FAD would be the way to go.

    Best regards,

    Rich

    J Nutr. 1982 Feb;112(2):263-8.
    FMN phosphatase and FAD pyrophosphatase in rat intestinal brush borders: role in intestinal absorption of dietary riboflavin.
    Akiyama T, Selhub J, Rosenberg IH.
    Abstract

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), are two major coenzyme forms of dietary riboflavin. Yet little attention has been given to the release of the vitamin from its coenzyme forms during the absorptive process. Homogenates from rat intestine catalyze the hydrolases of these flavin coenzymes. To determine the location of FMN and FAD hydrolases, homogenates of intestinal mucosa were fractioned. FMN and FAD phosphatases were localized in brush border membranes. FAD pyrophosphatase activity was maximal at pH between 6.5 and 8.5 while FMN phosphatase has a pH optimum of 7.5 - 8.0. FAD pyrophosphatase is more stable to heat. The two enzymes separate on ion exchange chromatography of an isobutanol extract of intestinal brush border membrane fraction. Inhibition of 14C-riboflavin uptake by FMN and FAd in everted rings of rat intestine is directly related to the amount of conversion of these coenzymes to free riboflavin by intestinal enzymes. When FMN and FAD conversion to riboflavin is inhibited by EDTA, competition with 14C-riboflavin for transport was correspondingly decreased. These studies are best explained by a sequential process in which hydrolysis of FMN and FAD by enzymes of the intestinal brush border is followed by absorption of free riboflavin.

    PMID:
    6120218


    Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1983;53(1):109-14.
    Hydrolysis of FMN and FAD by alkaline phosphatase of the intestinal brush-border membrane.
    Daniel H, Binninger E, Rehner G.
    Abstract

    Both FMN and FAD were found to be hydrolysed with saturation kinetics by purified alkaline phosphatase (aPase E.C. 3.1.3.1) as well as by a brush-border membrane preparation (BBMp) from rat jejunum. With aPase the KM-value was 11.0 mmole/l when FMN was applied and 4.4 mmole/l when FAD was used. The apparent KM-values with the BBMp were calculated to be 22.9 mmole/l for FMN and 5.7 mmole/l for FAD as substrates. The BBMp contained FMN- and FAD-hydrolysing activity besides that due to the aPase. Regarding the high phosphatase activities associated with the brush-border membrane, it seems unlikely that FMN and FAD penetrate this membrane without being split. The transmural intestinal transport of 14C-riboflavin was tested in vitro in the presence of non-labelled FMN and FAD. The transport rate of the labelled riboflavin was found to be reduced by the coenzymes. It could be concluded that 14C-riboflavin competed with the non-labelled riboflavin released by the phosphatases for the binding sites of a hypothetical transport carrier.

    PMID:
    6853053
  18. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, xlynx.

    Not that I know of. Do you recall the source of this information? It may have originated from the Pfeiffer Center's view of socalled "overmethlators," which they say are high in histamine. This does not make sense to me, because if the methylation cycle and hence the folate metabolism are operating well, there should be less histidine to be converted to histamine, and the other pathway for breaking down histamine, which uses a methyltransferase, should work faster. I think the result would be lower histamine, rather than higher.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  19. lizw118

    lizw118 Senior Member

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    Hi xlynx
    That is great news abut the histame. I have tried that but I didn't notice anything. Did you take it right before meals? Or did you take it throughout the day?
    Congrats!
    liz
  20. kurt

    kurt Senior Member

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    xylnx,
    Do you react to foods high in histamine? Sounds like you may be histamine intolerant.

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