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"5 Reasons My Google Search Is Worth As Much As Your Medical Degree"

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Kyla, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. Kyla

    Kyla ᴀɴɴɪᴇ ɢꜱᴀᴍᴩᴇʟ

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    http://www.misstreated.org/blog/201...search-is-worth-more-than-your-medical-degree

    The title of this article is a bit click-baity, but this is a great article on why Doctor's should listen to their patients and be open to them being experts on their own bodies and conditions.

    Excerpt:

     
    JaimeS, LiveAgain, Woolie and 30 others like this.
  2. meandthecat

    meandthecat Senior Member

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    What struck me was the response to such a reasonable artic!e, comments spiraling off into contempt and hatred. Why am I surprised? Probably for the same reasons I keep open the chance of being listened to or respected by a doctor.......but it brings with it alot of disappointment.
     
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  3. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    Theoretical knowledge can be great but sometimes just having had chronic illness for many years can teach you far more than a book ever could.

    Doctors will often do just a Pubmed search and repeat the conclusions of the abstract (see PACE for example).

    Then they will insist they are right because they have a medical degree.

    This happened to me. Months of research which would include hundreds of Pubmed studies were irrelevant because the doctor did a single Pubmed query and didn't bother to look for more than 5 minutes.

    Then I am expected to blindly accept their "expertise".
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
    garcia, leela, Jennifer J and 16 others like this.
  4. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I've visited a doctor who looked up something on Wikipedia and quoted it to me. (not joking at all).
     
  5. CCC

    CCC Senior Member

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    I print out the whole article and hand it over, then ask for the blood test we want, using the article as the explanation. A good doctor is interested.

    Great article, by the way. It's exactly how some doctors treat their patients.
     
    Karena, JaimeS, alkt and 1 other person like this.
  6. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    If a doctor is using Wikipedia they are practicing medicine, if a patient is using Wikipedia they are practicing hypochondria.
     
    Isaiah 58:11, garcia, leela and 18 others like this.
  7. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    I used to use Wikipedia - until I discovered Phoenix Rising!

    I like the sentence from the 'RN' (whatever important qualification that might be) 'But that being said, a diagnosis doesn't come out of an ass; it comes from an algorithm based on years of research from people who do this for a living, not a bored suburban stay at home mom.' - Little do they know. I have no more used an algorithm than a Salsa rhythm (actually one of my PhD student did take me Salsa dancing once but we decided it was better for me to sit out while she danced with Mexicans).

    I now use Google in preference to Pubmed for trawling data. Except in ME where someone on this site has always got there first.

    There are two sides to every argument but I vote for the author here.
     
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  8. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    Talking of algorithms, I propose we replace GPs with Doctor Google.

    The robot doctor will see you now...
     
    garcia likes this.
  9. Comet

    Comet I'm Not Imaginary

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    Great blog post. Misogyny, dismissiveness, lack of true interest or compassion from the Medicals, lack of applying the individuality of a patient to a diagnosis, lack of actual thinking... yep... been there... experienced that.
     
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  10. u&iraok

    u&iraok Senior Member

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    I've seen a lot of cases where doctors don't want to suggest it but they are hoping you do your research. When you do they give a sigh of relief, as if they were thinking they couldn't suggest it but they don't have enough time to do the research they need to help you so hopefully you will do it.

    Often, too, they agree that you should follow what you researched.

    I remember when I had candida and was seeing an naturopath/nutritionist for it but I needed a blood test so I went to my doctor for it. I had spent hours researching candida and then found my ND's website and read for hours about candida on his site and he also taught me about it. My doctor asked me many questions about it and we talked about it for a long time. I knew more about it then he did. At least he wanted to learn.
     
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  11. Richard7

    Richard7 Senior Member

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    @chipmunk1 My sister had a similar experience. Saw the doctor, got advice, followed the advice; took an idle moment to read the papers, and realised that he had relied on misleading abstracts. What joy.

    And this was not a doctor who was not interested, just, I suspect, one who was trying to do too much in too little time.
     
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  12. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    The funniest experience I had years ago was on website that allowed you to pay for an online consultation with a doctor: you wrote down your symptoms, paid anything from $5 to $50, depending on how much of the doctor's time you wanted, and then the doctor would send you their response and some diagnostic suggestions. I think I paid $10.

    When I got the my reply, it was a paragraph that I had written myself, copied from my very own website!

    I did not have the heart to tell the doctor, though.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2016
  13. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    Wow! Plagiarism is the sincerest way to rip you off!
     
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  14. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    J.E. !!! :p:D:D:rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
    Mel9 likes this.
  15. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    These are some of the funniest comments I've read on PR in a long time. That's dramatic irony for you.

    I liked the comment on the article that stated something along the lines of, "we can all learn how to properly read science. After all, the doctors had to learn as well." I'm not sure what people think happens at medical school, but no one waves a magic wand that confers all knowledge! Physicians-in-training have to learn how to read through science, dissect and dismiss bad science, and learn to reject appeals to authority and appeals to popularity, just like the rest of us.

    -J
     
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  16. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem All Good Things Must Come to an End

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    Yes so few of them demonstrate this ability.
     
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  17. Skippa

    Skippa Anti-BS

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    I sometimes think that the difference between a certified medic and a layman is the fact that the certified medic has learned the name of each and every bone in the human body.

    "I'm right, because I know the name of the bone, you're just pointing"...

    Being a good doctor and being a good scientist are not synonymous. But they should be.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  18. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    An obvious mistake. A large percentage of abstracts are not reliable for information, they are just a clue to finding out if you want to read the paper. Nobody should rely on abstracts, though with paywalls you cannot always get the full paper without paying money.
     
    Jennifer J, TiredSam and Valentijn like this.
  19. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    This is the point of the evidence based practice movement, which is different from evidence based medicine. Doctors need to learn these skills or the entire profession will become increasingly irrelevant. Dogmatic solutions, dogmatic practice, rather than problem solving, can be done by someone with very little training. The real need for doctors is to observe, think outside the box, and take the best strategy for a specific patient, and not the most recommended one in general.
     
  20. chipmunk1

    chipmunk1 Senior Member

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    They don't learn that much about science in med school. Not much different from many other college degrees.

    Also they learn very little about psychology/psychiatry.

    So if someone has a MD degree they should be knowledgable about the human body but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are scientists or can read scientific publications or that they are expert psychologists.
     

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