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23andme Raw Data Interpretation - Diet

Discussion in 'Information and Resources' started by niki, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. niki

    niki

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    Hey Folks!

    I am looking for direction on a free resource to interpret my raw DNA data from 23andme in relation to the "ideal diet" for me (based on results). I can't seem to find details on which genes or an upload option (for free) anywhere. Has anyone done this and know the 5-7 genes interpreted that I could compare?

    I realize that there are layers of issue that could take me away from this ideal diet. But I am looking to use the info I have for results similar to what DNAFIT may offer.

    In the meantime I am weighing out the importance of the polymorphisms listed. I get confused where many related to CFS are carried by 50% of the population (NutraHacker provided this gene frequency info). I don't think 50% of the population are dealing with the symptoms I have so.... it brings up a lot of questions around how important DNA is, the interpreations of it, and why I would be expressing the symptoms despite the "optimal lifestyle"

    Any thoughts or resources welcome!!

    Best,
    Niki
     
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    @niki - Often the "risk" alleles have little or no impact, depending on the quality of the study and the effect size found. The only way to know is by reading the research for those SNPs. But generally speaking, if it isn't a missense, nonsense, or stop-gain mutation, it isn't having a significant impact.

    Nutrahacker has no comprehension of what they're doing. They grab information from various sources on the internet and cut and paste it into their reports. Some of it was plagiarized word-for-word from my posts on this forum, though they did remove it when requested. As a result, much of their suggestions and "risks" are contradictory to their other suggestions and risks. I wouldn't bother with them at all.
     
    ukxmrv likes this.
  3. niki

    niki

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  4. niki

    niki

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    I should have reached out before I soent $50! Thank you for that information. I'm not sure what a misense nonsense stop gain polymorphism would be but I will search for it ;) I can list the marked polymorphisms and if you know how to pick them out or someone who does know- that would be amazing!
     
  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    People can have different genotypes for an SNP. Hence most people might have "CC", but some have "AC" and a very few have "AA" for a certain SNP. The letters used tell genes how to create proteins in the body, by specifying which amino acids should be used in its form. Most of the alternative letters for SNPs don't result in any change to the amino acids used, and the proteins are normal.

    But sometimes a different letter in the gene (A instead of C, perhaps) results in the gene putting a different amino acid into the protein it creates. That would results in a missense mutation, and a protein that is different from normal. Often that missense mutation won't cause much or any problem, because some amino acids behave very much like each other. But other times it can have a big impact, such as if the new amino acid forms stronger or weaker bonds, and causes the protein to break down at higher or lower temperatures than usual. Which can result in levels of that protein in the body becoming too high or too low.

    Nonsense mutations (called stop-gain mutations sometimes) happen when a change in the gene tells it to stop coding the protein prematurely. This can result in either a partial protein which might or might not be at all functional, or no protein being created at all. Similarly, some genes can be entirely absent in some people - GSTM1 and GSTT1 are common examples.
     
  6. niki

    niki

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    Amazing! Thank you Valintijn! I will research this afternoon. I don't want to waste time looking under the wrong rock so this is very helpful. I spend lots of money I don't have on treatments that only go so far and repeated every couple months. It's insanity. This will offer insight even if there is nothing to act on here....

    If bored (ha ha) this is what is listed (only homozygous) and I will look into:
    Category - RSID - Gene - Expected (*) - My Genotype (**:2/2)
    Detoxification rs72547513 CYP1A2 C AA: 2/2
    Detoxification rs1695 GSTP1 G AA: 2/2
    Energy / Oxidation rs10370 SOD2 G TT: 2/2
    Energy / Oxidation rs2855262 SOD2 T CC: 2/2
    Neurotransmitter rs2391191 DAOA G AA: 2/2
    Neurotransmitter rs701567 DAOA G TT: 2/2
    Neurotransmitter rs3749034 GAD1 A GG: 2/2
    Neurotransmitter rs3828275 GAD1 G TT: 2/2
    Folate One-Carbon rs3758149 GGH C AA: 2/2
    Metabolism /
    Methylation (FOCM)
    (FOCM) rs2236225 MTHFD1 G AA: 2/2
    (FOCM) rs7946 PEMT C TT: 2/2
    HPA axis/Endocrine rs3774261 ADIPOQ A GG: 2/2
    HPA axis / Endocrine rs560887 G6PC2 T CC: 2/2
    HPA axis / Endocrine rs2918419 NR3C1 C TT: 2/2
    HPA axis / Endocrine rs6196 NR3C1 G AA: 2/2
    HPA axis / Endocrine rs860458 NR3C1 A GG: 2/2
    Digestion / Elimination rs6420424 BCMO1 A GG: 2/2
    Digestion / Elimination rs6564851 BCMO1 G TT: 2/2
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  7. niki

    niki

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    Darn the formatting was ruined when posted...
     

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