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23&me Results - feedback greatly appreciated

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by vgorilla, May 30, 2013.

  1. vgorilla

    vgorilla Trust my doctor?

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    Atlanta, GA
    Here are my results. If I understand it right, I need to support methylation with methyl-B12, folate, and DMG. It also appears that I have low dopamine, which would explain why I am so ADD and a sensation seeker. How can I support dopamine? Any other info would be helpful, and I don't even know where to start on the detox profile.

    Thanks in advance!

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  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Amersfoort, Netherlands
    You're very much right about the dopamine. Your COMT and MAO are normal, so you degrade it at a normal rate, but you'll be producing it slower due to your VDR Taq. You can support dopamine production with methylB12 and/or vitamin D supplementation, or you might be able to inhibit COMT to slow down degradation a bit.

    MTHFR indicates low methylfolate production, so supplementing that should help and there's no indication that it'll hurt.

    Your MTR and MTRR involve methylB12. It's not too messed up for you, but the MTR means you're breaking it down somewhat too fast, and you might be a little bit slow in producing it due to your MTRR. Supplementing methylB12 should help, and again there's no indication that it would cause you any problems.

    CYP1A1 is involved in metabolizing certain drugs.

    CYP1B1 is involved in synthesizing cholesterol, steroids, and other fats, as well as vitamin D metabolism and some drug and toxin metabolism. You're probably going to have a pretty bad reaction to whatever drugs this one should be metabolizing (the only research I can find is referencing cancer drugs).

    Your CYP2D6 results indicate that you will be metabolizing the relevant drugs very quickly. They're listed as "substrates" at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CYP2D6, and the "inhibitors" may slow things down a bit.

    For GSTP1 again there isn't much info on what it detoxes. It's involved in acetominophin (paracetamol) break down however, and looks like a problem in the stage involving them results in increased toxicity: http://www.pharmgkb.org/pathway/PA165986279 .

    SOD2 transforms superoxide in your mitochrondria into nicer things. There hasn't been any study of SOD2 and disease in humans, but it can be nasty. Anti-oxidants in your food and supplements may help, as well as supplementing to help glutathione production (NAC and/or glycine usually, plus any needed cofactors).

    NAT1 is metabolizing drugs, and involved in folate metabolism.

    Your NAT2 may make it harder to break down drugs which are arylamines or hydrazines.
    LaurieL likes this.
  3. vgorilla

    vgorilla Trust my doctor?

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    Atlanta, GA
    Valentijn,
    Thank you for the analysis. I see you spend a lot of time here helping people.

    The CYP2D6 drug list explains a lot for me and my past experience. It is very reassuring to see pieces of the puzzle finally starting to fit together.
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  4. AVS

    AVS

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    Very nice Valentin. I was wondering where you heard about the second chart that was listed ( with all drug interaction SNPs). I am curious about learning more. Thanks
  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    I don't think there's a source of compiled info on that one. It's more of a matter of looking at wikipedia and a couple gene databases that have some info.
  6. LaurieL

    LaurieL Senior Member

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    GSTP1 is one mutation in the glutithione detoxification pathway. It is especially important in the detoxification of non-polar metabolites, of which can be referred to as hydrophobic, or most in which are lipophilic. It is also important in detoxifying positively charged metabolites, such as oxidation creates as one example.

    They use acetominphen as a challenge to evaluate the functionality. The time it takes the body to clear a certain amount of the acetominophen challenge is directly correlated with the function of GTSP1. Mutations are associated with a down-regulation, or lesser functioning gene.

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