New Atmosphere, New Vision: Gibson and Whittemore Kick Off Invest in ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry reports on Dr. Gibson's introduction and Dr. Whittemore's keynote speech, at the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London.
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2014 Chalder chapter on CFS

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Esther12, May 9, 2014.

  1. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    A lot of it is available on google docs... it's as you'd expect.

    Some stuff on PACE recovery. The whole thing seems really fluffy, and one would hope that it would leave readers decidedly sceptical of it all... but the books editor decided to go with it. The book's not out yet. A few pages are missing, and it might be better to read on google books (it will be less blurry there): https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Rehabilitative Treatments and Mechanisms of Change 501 Trudie Chalder Mostofsky, David I. The Handbook of Behavioral Medicine&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls

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  2. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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  3. biophile

    biophile Places I'd rather be.

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    No mention of objective outcomes (beyond the unimproved fitness of GET patients, which is solely mentioned to bolster the psychobabble), which is a rather dishonest omission.
     
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  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Sad. So very very sad.
     
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  5. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Such persistent selectivity and misrepresentation is straight lying. There is no possible way she can plead ignorance about the full evidentiary picture, and the serious problems with her claims.

    Chalder is a liar and a coward. She would rather sacrifice us than admit she is wrong.

    Utterly contemptible.
     
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  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn The Diabolic Logic

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    Also no mention that the "physical function" improvements in PACE were on a questionnaire, not in actual, you know, "physical function".
     
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  7. Bob

    Bob

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    Thanks Esther. I can't 'like' your posts. But I do appreciate your efforts.

    I'm finding it impossible to find the right words to describe the text.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  8. Bob

    Bob

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    I think these sections needs requoting:
     
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  9. Bob

    Bob

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    Some notes.

    "The CBT model attempts to incorporate the heterogeneous nature of the condition..."
    ...unless the patient has a biomedical illness.

    Although plenty of discussion of the PACE trial, there is no mention that there was only 11-15% clinical response rate in the PACE trial, for self-reported outcomes only, and that CBT failed to improve objectively measured physical disability, employment data or welfare benefits claims.

    As we know, the research re childhood trauma etc., is inconsistent and incredible. Considering the vast heterogeneity of CFS, it makes the vague discussions re childhood trauma etc. utterly devoid of meaning.

    Chalder is clearly focusing on a small minority of her patients who she thinks respond to CBT. In other words, those patients who are receptive to CBT and who give positive feedback about it.

    It doesn't seem surprising that patients who can accept the premise that they have a psychological illness may respond more positively to CBT, in self-reported outcomes, than those who know that they have a biomedical illness.
    However, the objective evidence demonstrates that CBT does not improve physical disability in CFS, even though it is designed to do so.


    "The evidence suggests that the most effective treatments for CFS are CBT and graded exercise therapy (GET). The CBT model attempts to incorporate the heterogeneous nature of the condition and stresses the role of perpetuating factors. The treatment for CFS therefore involves planned activity and rest, graded increases in activity, a sleep routine, and cognitive restructuring of unhelpful beliefs and assumptions."

    Except that GET now tends to be a form of pacing, rather than 'graded increases in activity', because graded exercise doesn't work, thus undermining their whole pathetic model of illness.
     
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  10. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    OT did you type that out bob, or find a way to copy and paste?
     
  11. Cheshire

    Cheshire Senior Member

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    Hopefully, with CBT and GET the recovery rate is totally amazing!!

    That's the numbers we should see highlighted after the pace trial: 5% of total recovery, a triumph!

    Their success is unexisting, “all in their mind”, but rather than allowing us to pace at our own rythm, they prefer make us feel guilty for our inability to get better when they aren’t able to help us.
     
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  12. Bob

    Bob

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    I'm afraid I haven't found a clever way to copy and paste. I typed it. There's probably some typos!
     
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  13. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I've taught myself to touch type copying CFS stuff out from google books... would love to not have to!
     
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  14. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    This material sounds similar to older texts about illnesses that were once considered partially or entirely psychosomatic. One difference is that the focus today is on thoughts and behavior rather than repressed emotions and character structure.
     
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  15. SDSue

    SDSue Southeast

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    We'd be better off if the author subscribed to the theories of Hippocrates in the 5th century BC. At lest Hippocrates believed there was a physical cause to seemingly unrelated symptoms:

    The "bad uterus" takes to wandering around the body, causing various kinds of disorders such as anxiety, sense of suffocation, tremors, sometimes even convulsions and paralysis.

    If the uterus has moved upwards, place malodorous and acrid substances near the woman’s mouth and nostrils, while scented ones were placed near her vagina; on the contrary, if the uterus has lowered, place the acrid substances near her vagina and the perfumed ones near her mouth and nostrils.
    And so it goes in the wonderful world of ME/CFS "experts" :)
     
  16. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Yes, Freudian babble with new bells and whistles.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  17. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    And before that, moral failings.
     
  18. daisybell

    daisybell Senior Member

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    I'm speechless....
     
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  19. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Case in point:

    This was written in 1951. http://journals.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=144588

    Now what happens if we replace peptic ulcers with CFS and replace terms from a psychoanalytical context with those from a biopsychosocial one?

     
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  20. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    The thing is there are indeed cultural factors in peptic ulcers, and they are behavioral, but they are not psychological. How people live, and cook and prepare food has an impact, by increasing transmission rates of H. pylori.

    The medical profession has had the means to prove ME is a severely debilitating physical illness since 1949. They failed. With some exceptions, they are still failing.
     
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