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181, New painkiller. An opiod without addictive qualities

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Hugo, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. Hugo

    Hugo Senior Member

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    Little Bluestem, Orla, Skippa and 4 others like this.
  2. Shoshana

    Shoshana Northern USA

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    Thanks for sharing this, @Hugo
     
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  3. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    The "feelgood" isn't the only reason for opoid addiction. A possibly even bigger problem is physical dependence and withdrawal. I wonder how they intend to tackle that?
     
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  4. Hugo

    Hugo Senior Member

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    The physical dependence is in part because of the dopamin reaction to opiods. The company (nektar) belive if the drug will be aproved it will have a schedule class 3 or lover (most opiods have a class 2). This is what DEA says about class 3. Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2017
  5. bombsh3ll

    bombsh3ll Senior Member

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    Always good to have more options! I take codeine now and again for headaches not relieved by milder painkillers. There is certainly a stigma around getting prescriptions & if this has, or is seen as having, less abuse potential it could increase patient access to effective pain relief. Have to say I never noticed any "feelgood" factor from codeine or even IV morphine in the hospital, beyond being free from pain. I think receptor variability and activity between people, particularly in the brain, is far more diverse than most realize.
     
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  6. Hugo

    Hugo Senior Member

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    Interesting that you didnt have any high from IV morphine, but I guess everyone is different as you say.

    In opiods there is a huge problem with the intestenes and constipation, I dont know if this new medicine will have any effect on this.

    I dont know the strength of the opiod on Nektars version either but if one would use a weaker opiod like codeine or tramadol (probably the first choise anyhow for pain like mine and for many others) it could make this opiods more easily accessable and possible easier to take and manage.
     
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  7. bombsh3ll

    bombsh3ll Senior Member

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    Yes, I have to be in pain severe enough to warrant an enema in order to take more than one dose of codeine ;)
     
  8. Alvin2

    Alvin2 If humans were rational...

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    Lets keep in mind many drugs are released that are "non addictive". In 30 years lets see if this label holds up, i can think of countless painkillers, anti depressants, sleep pills and so forth that were marketed as non addictive when they were first put on the market.
     
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  9. Basilico

    Basilico Florida

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    This is interesting, but the effects compared against placebo seem minimal.

    51% taking the painkiller said their pain went down by half, compared to 38% taking a placebo.

    That does not seem like a significant enough difference to get too excited, but the more pain treatment options that exist the better, so I don't want to dismiss it, either.
     
  10. Hugo

    Hugo Senior Member

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    Thats true but I guess also you have to follow the patients over time. Placebo generally go down over time.
     
  11. Hugo

    Hugo Senior Member

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    Yes as Hixxy are saying in her post just because it doesnt have the "high" doesnt mean it doesnt have other problems like dependence and withdrawal. But the effect opiods have on dopamine is generally all of this so I would guess its better than a standard opiod. More testing is needed ofcourse.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017

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