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12 weeks IV antibiotics

Discussion in 'Antivirals, Antibiotics and Immune Modulators' started by yabeeb, Feb 18, 2015.

  1. yabeeb

    yabeeb

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    There's probably loads written already on this but i don't have much time to read...

    I am due to start 12 weeks IV antibiotics with KDM in Belgium early March. Was just wondering if there is anything I can specifically do to prepare in advance??

    #gettingnervous

    Thanks
     
    justy likes this.
  2. Vic

    Vic

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    You could cancel. I'm not giving medical advice, but from what I've seen antibiotics don't work any better than placebo. Big waste of time, money, effort, and will highly likely just drain you.
     
    barbc56 likes this.
  3. yabeeb

    yabeeb

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    Hey thanks for the reply!

    I already know the risks involved but I've come to the conclusion i'm willing to take them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2015
  4. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    I posted a recent thread that showed a german study I think where oral abx roxithromycin and bactrim was more affective for chronic lyme than iv abx.

    there is so much research out there to back anyones view though.

    A cure is a big call but improvement seems possible. Plenty of people here saying they have felt better treating infections.

    I would also be looking into ongoing treatment after the iv abx are finished, also the right treatment to look after proper gut bacteria as well as supplements to protect liver and kidney function from all the medication. One more thing would be ways to treat symptomatically as many have herx reactions etc with treatments, so want to try and not suffer too much??

    Good luck.
     
    yabeeb and justy like this.
  5. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

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    As a person with chronic lyme speaking to many others that chose both routes I would possibly opt out. There is a lot of new evidence with each study that shows further complications antibiotics can trigger then previously realized, things like mitochodrial damage and dysfunction, shifts in microbiota functioning, stress on a very cellular level.

    Of everyone I talked to and from those who did recover it felt that response to strong IV antibiotic therapy was not too great of a determining factor to make worthwhile. Many people took it for years, and years and were still sick, others took it for around six months then stopped and relapsed some time later.

    Most develop issues with candida and always report feeling way sicker after starting it. Of course some do get well on it as well. It is just very hard on the system and I question if its worth the risk/reward myself. Keep in mind you can always try an herbal anti microbial protocol route as well.

    Oral antibiotics were also shown to be as effective as IV if given the right dosages and combinations. Generally though it seems evident now that any form of long term pharmaceutical antibiotic therapy is very hard and stressing on the body, akin to chemotherapy for cancer. Perhaps this is why some people get well with it and others either relapse or do not get better after years of treatment with it.

    If you do decide to follow through with it then I would definitely suggest you take NAC as its been shown to help protect the mitochondria during the treatment, do not use any form of quinoline based antibiotics(one of most toxic drugs on planet), take plenty of probiotics while you are receiving treatment, and make sure your vitamins/micro mineral needs are met.

    You will need a strong bio film/cyst buster and be sure that the antibiotics target all the co infections you are dealing with, if not combine them with things that will. Buhner has some herbs that are suggested and synergetic with antibiotics to treat certain infections. At least that way you make sure you really clear everything out. You may also want to do a fecal gut microbe transplant after your antibiotic therapy is finished as well.
     
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  6. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

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    I look at it as whats the alternative treatments?

    I think as far as being curative, it depends if the infection is the main cause or if its the immune dysfunction that allows the infections in. If the chronic infection is because of the immune dysfunction than its possible one will need to stay on abx or go back on with relapses.

    Lots of ifs that we just dont know. Maybe this is what research needs to work out. I think there will be large numbers in both groups???

    KDM is a smart guy and helped turn many people around. Following his advice is better than us few mugs on an internet forum.
     
    SOC, minkeygirl, Sushi and 8 others like this.
  7. Daffodil

    Daffodil Senior Member

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    don't take magnesium with azithromycin I think......ask about this. I think the Mg causes some absorption issues.
    for rocephin, ask about taking actigall to help protect your gall bladder. check to see if they even have the drug in Belgium. if not, you can take it with you from here. personally, I would ask my local doc to give me a Rx and I would take it with me.
    you can also take malic acid to help protect the gall bladder but you should ask about this too
     
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  8. yabeeb

    yabeeb

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    Thanks @Daffodil What's Rx??
     
  9. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    A prescription.
     
  10. yabeeb

    yabeeb

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    ah OK. Thanks @Sushi

    No chance. My UK GP said he isn't getting involved!
     
  11. Daffodil

    Daffodil Senior Member

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    well then just take Malic Acid. I think it was a few hundred mg a day. but you should try to get Actigall somehow.
     
    yabeeb likes this.
  12. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    Depending on how bad your current condition is, you might want to prepare to have some assistance on call, in case you have a herxheimer reaction with much hypotension. It can make it much more difficult to prepare food, take showers, or whatever other daily tasks you can usually manage.

    I have thin veins which like to hide, so I ended up with a cannula in my foot for a couple weeks. It's intensely painful to walk like that, so I hopped around while leaning on a chair with felt pads on its feet so I could slide it along on the wood floor. But getting to the bathroom and back was all I could manage at the time, so it was great having my mother-in-law staying here during the IV days and taking care of me and cooking us dinner and such.
     
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  13. yabeeb

    yabeeb

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    Thanks @Valentijn. Tried to persuade my mum to be my live in carer but she told me to get lost!!
     
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  14. RML

    RML Senior Member

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    Bring a shower sleeve (not sure if this is correct term for it). It's a plastic covering to protect bandage and port cath from getting wet during week while showering. I bought one in Boots cheaply.

    And perhaps pack a sports bra? I can't manage bra's at all , to hook it up or unhook it myself. This is the thing I need help with most from my Mum. I think I remember someone else mentioning this a big problem as she was staying on her own and didn't have help. Mostly depended on where the needle was inserted, restricted certain movements. Or at least I found myself doing things one handed or needed lots of help to do things.

    Also make sure the sweaters you pack are loose in the sleeve and at the cuff so they can roll up to the elbow etc, and also enough room to fit over the bandaged area which can be quite thick lump. This wasn't such a problem in the summer where my clothes are looser or short sleeved. But now I am here again in winter, so many of my tops are chunky knits or tight fitting. I have had to cut a few of my sweaters and a long sleeve vest along the length at the cuff so they fit over big lump bandaged up! Just a silly thing really but such a nuisance and something you wouldn't even think of.

    Good luck with it all, if you are coming here early in March, I will probably still be here.
     
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