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1 disorder which traditional medicine can't cure, and alternative medicine can?

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by svetoslav80, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    Southern USA
    A person should never have to choose. We have to have both.
     
  2. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    In an ideal world, this would be true. But in reality many people have neither.

    It's up to each person to find and choose what works best for them.
     
  3. Calathea

    Calathea Darkness therapy

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    I'm currently on a low-fat diet due to gallstones. I'm booked to see a surgeon in February and they'll probably want to remove my gall bladder, but I don't know if it's worth the risk of major crash due to being in hospital. Anyway, while I still have this gall bladder, I have to eat only small amounts of fat at any one time. Is it worth using the odd bit of coconut oil, or is it pointless if my gall bladder isn't functioning?
     
  4. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Calathea.

    I think that taking enough coconut oil at one time to produce ketone bodies for the brain could likely cause a problem for you if your gall bladder is not in good condition. Sorry about that.

    Rich
     
  5. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1

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    To those who were discussing hypoglycemia and carbs, be aware that carbs "for some" can actually cause hypoglycemia.

    My severe hypoglycemia seems to have been caused by that. Eat carbs (in my case even the complex carbs even affects me eg severe response to a salad of chickpeas) insulin is triggered. I was producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinemia).. insulin drops glucose. In my own case I do better on Atkins diet (eg only 15-30g carbs per day).
     
    Sparrowhawk likes this.
  6. avreed

    avreed

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    Catseye - I see that you are in SW Florida and from your posts have a very clued in doctor. I have spent the last 3 years trying to find a competent doctor in Florida to no avail. I am on the SE coast but would be willing to travel anywhere in the state. I particularly like that your guy uses Biotics Research products as they are really great but no one I have seen has even heard of them. As all of us on this board, I have some very complicated immune problems which are beyond my ability to treat myself at this point. I worked a lot with Rich Van K prior to his tragic demise and he helped me a lot with understanding the methylation/sulfation aspect of things. However, I really need help in the gut/brain immune department and I have hit a brick wall re: doctors. Perhaps you would be kind enough to PM me and we could chat about this. Also, would love to hear how you are doing. Hope all is well.
     
  7. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I read a paper which I found on Medscape not too long ago, (I'm registered and get sent links to the latest stuff) in which a clinical trial was done with milk thistle and chemotherapy - the milk thistle was proven to protect the liver from damage from the chemo.
    I also read another paper in which it was found that in acupuncture, it doesn't matter where the needles are put for it to "work".
    (I'm so terrified of needles nothing on earth would persuade my to try it - and I don't "believe" in it in the first place. The more invasive or painful a placebo treatment is, the more "effective" it is found to be.)
    Not too long ago, I think it was found that having a placebo response was genetic. I don't respond.


    Does oil of oregano taste of oregano? (It's my favourite herb.) I'd be interested in trying a bit of that.:)
     
  8. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Senior Member

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    peggy-sue I also can't stand needles, so when I first went in for acupuncture at the insistence of a colleague, for several weeks, my practitioner only used magnets and a clicking point stimulator, or heat (called moxa) on the points. I'm generally a skeptic but I have seen over time that acupuncture is one thing that can help nudge my body in different ways towards stability. Digestion, sciatica, energy levels, have been helped over time. So now I'm less leery about the needles, although he still uses the "small" ear needles on me, and I go twice a week because nothing else I have tried in 18 months has been as consistently helpful. As always, YMMV.
     
  9. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I'm a bit more than "can't stand needles". I run away and lock myself in the nearest loo and refuse to come out. It's very embarrassing, so I had a course of hypnotherapy to help me deal with it.
    I can now "transfer" my flight reaction into one of staying still, if I am lying down and somebody is hanging onto my arm, to prevent me pulling myself off the needle, and only if I am allowed to blether nonsense non-stop. If I do this, I can allow blood to be drawn.
    If it came to a needle which was going to introduce a drug or inocculation into me, you would find me locked in the loo again.
    It took 5 nurses to hold me down when I was being given an anaesthetic to remove an infected ingrown toenail several years ago. I was crying and begging them to do it without anaesthetic.
    (I couldn't run away because I couldn't walk.) I am truly phobic about needles.
     
  10. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Senior Member

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    Wow, ok forgive me in that case for even mentioning the pointy word, but just wanted you to know there are a few ways to get sme of the benefits of acupuncture without those pesky metallic items.
     
    peggy-sue likes this.
  11. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    :hug: You are completely forgiven, I know you were just trying to be as helpful as possible and to reassure me. :thumbsup: Thank-you for the use of "pointy word" too!
     
    Sparrowhawk likes this.
  12. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Richvank recommended watching the Burzynski's movie on page 3 about 1/2 way down. Tc.. x
     
  13. redrachel76

    redrachel76 Senior Member

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    I am unable to read the whole thread so excuse me if this has been mentioned before.

    I offer simple back pain has been helped by alternative med bit not conventional.
    (I'm not talking about stuff that needs operations.)
    Most people with back pain get help with chiropracts, massage, weight loss , exercise (if they don't have CFS) and capsaicin cream, feldenkrais, yoga etc.

    Whereas conventional medicine is just pain killers with side effects and being told to exercise.

    It's a good question. It's true that I only go to alternative med when I am unhappy with conventional medicine.
     
    svetoslav80 likes this.

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