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just stuff

Blog entry posted by taniaaust1, Nov 29, 2011.

Tomorrow.. well actually its today now being 5.30am right now as I havent been able to get to sleep, I have another meeting at 11.30am to once again beg and plead for some home support.

Thou physically I are no better then my normal. I had the proof today that my brain is certainly becoming better. :) I managed to with some help, get a page going on the internet wikipedia on Orthostatic Hypertension (it didnt previously exist there) and in one day, have that page looking good (so far im the only one who's put info in but with others doing my corrections). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthostatic_hypertension

Ive cant believe that Im learning wiki coding (thou I did take a lot of notes and got help throu a live chat). Thanks to the selenium and molybdenum which I think are responsible for my brain really starting to come back. There is no way I would of been able to do what Im doing before.
taniaaust1

About the Author

Doing a bit of a blog at http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/tanias-journal-of-drug-treatments-and-other-me-things.13903/page-4#post-273488
  1. taniaaust1
    Im going to post the following here that Ive done the the web wiki as I fear the page may be removed as Ive had someone dispute it today due to my sources being "primary" ones instead of the prefered wikipedia (not the PR wiki) "secondary" ones. Of cause seeing not much at all has been written yet on Orthostatic Hypertension.. the most info one can get on it is via scienctific studies (primary sources).

    What ive put together so far (as ive been working on it from the start on the actual wiki with another at times correcting my format/spelling errors.. ive cut and pasted start from there..so it isnt here in an easy to read format).

    "Orthostatic hypertension or postural hypertension is a medical condition consisting of a sudden increase in blood pressure when a person stands up.[1] Orthostatic hypertension is diagnosed by a rise in systolic blood pressure of 20 mmHg or more when standing. When the diastolic reading is involved in this manner, this is called orthostatic diastolic hypertension, similarly sometimes orthostatic hypertension involving the systolic is known as systolic orthostatic hypertension. This disorder can be a type of dysautonomia.

    Baroreflex and autonomic pathways normally ensure that blood pressure is maintained despite various stimuli including posteral change. The precise mechanism of orthostatic hypertension thou remains unclear but it is thought that alpha-adrenergic activity may be the predominant pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic hypertension in elderly hypertensive patients.[2]

    The prevelence of 1.1% were found to have orthostatic hypertension in a large population study.[3] The risk of orthostatic hypertension has been found to increase with age with it being found in 16.3% older, hypertensive patients.[4]

    Dr David H.P. Streeten is the discoverer of orthostatic hypertension who also discovered hypothyriod hypertension and primary hyperephinphrinemia. Dr Steeten also made many other discoveries in endocrine, autonomic and orthostatic disorders. He gained an award from the American Heart Association for his many achievements. [5]

    Contents [hide]
    1 Symptoms
    2 Connections to other disorders
    3 Treatments
    4 Risks
    5 References


    [edit] SymptomsMild or moderate orthostatic hypertension may present without any symptoms other then the orthostatic hypertension BP findings. More severe orthostatic hypertension may present with the typical symptoms of hypertension.
    orthostatic venous pooling is common with orthostatic diastolic hypertension[6][7]
    Hypovolemia
    [edit] Connections to other disordersEssential hypertension
    Other kinds of dysautonomia may coexist, e.g. postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, orthostatic hypotension
    Type 2 diabetes[8]
    Vascular adrenergic hypersensitivity: Orthostatic hypertension can be secondary to this[9]
    Hypovolemia can cause orthostatic hypertension
    Renal arterial stenosis and nephroptosis have been known to cause orthostatic hypertension[10]
    Aortitis and nephroptosis, a case study quotes "This orthostatic hypertension largely may be due to an activation of the renin system caused by nephroptosis and partly due to a reduced baroreflex sensitivity caused by aortitis"[11]
    [edit] TreatmentsThere is not any offical recommended treatments currently for orthostatic hypertension as the condition is still little known and hence treatment for those with this disorder is still trial and error experimental treatment. Some treatments which have been successfully used for this condition are:

    Treatment of coexisting conditions (e.g. hypovolemia). Some specialists in severe cases give saline IVs for the hypovolemia which then if that is the cause, brings the orthostatic hypertension down to a safe level.
    Doxazosin[12]
    Carvedilol[13]
    Captopril and propranolol hydrochloride
    [edit] RisksBlood pressure variablity is associated with progression of target organ damage and cardiovascular risk[14]
    Orthostatic hypertension was positively associated with peripheral arterial disease[15]
    Increased occurrence of silent cerebrovascular ischemia[16][17]
    Systolic orthostatic hypertension increases stroke risk[18]
    [edit] References1.^ Fessel, J.; Robertson, D. (2006). "Orthostatic hypertension: When pressor reflexes overcompensate". Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology 2 (8): 424431. doi:10.1038/ncpneph0228. PMID 16932477. edit
    2.^ Kario, K.; Eguchi, K.; Hoshide, S.; Hoshide, Y.; Umeda, Y.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Shimada, K. (2002). "U-curve relationship between orthostatic blood pressure change and silent cerebrovascular disease in elderly hypertensives: Orthostatic hypertension as a new cardiovascular risk factor". Journal of the American College of Cardiology 40 (1): 133141. PMID 12103267. edit
    3.^ Wu, J. S.; Yang, Y. C.; Lu, F. H.; Wu, C. H.; Chang, C. J. (2008). "Population-Based Study on the Prevalence and Correlates of Orthostatic Hypotension/Hypertension and Orthostatic Dizziness". Hypertension Research 31 (5): 897904. doi:10.1291/hypres.31.897. PMID 18712045. edit
    4.^ Fan, X. H.; Sun, K.; Zhou, X. L.; Zhang, H. M.; Wu, H. Y.; Hui, R. T. (2011). "Association of orthostatic hypertension and hypotension with target organ damage in middle and old-aged hypertensive patients". Zhonghua yi xue za zhi 91 (4): 220224. PMID 21418863. edit
    5.^ http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/86/2/471.full.pdf
    6.^ Streeten, D. H.; Auchincloss Jr, J. H.; Anderson Jr, G. H.; Richardson, R. L.; Thomas, F. D.; Miller, J. W. (1985). "Orthostatic hypertension. Pathogenetic studies". Hypertension 7 (2): 196203. PMID 3980066. edit
    7.^ Streeten, D. H.; Anderson Jr, G. H.; Richardson, R.; Thomas, F. D. (1988). "Abnormal orthostatic changes in blood pressure and heart rate in subjects with intact sympathetic nervous function: Evidence for excessive venous pooling". The Journal of laboratory and clinical medicine 111 (3): 326335. PMID 3343547. edit
    8.^ Fessel, J.; Robertson, D. (2006). "Orthostatic hypertension: When pressor reflexes overcompensate". Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology 2 (8): 424431. doi:10.1038/ncpneph0228. PMID 16932477. edit
    9.^ Benowitz, N. L.; Zevin, S.; Carlsen, S.; Wright, J.; Schambelan, M.; Cheitlin, M. (1996). "Orthostatic hypertension due to vascular adrenergic hypersensitivity". Hypertension 28 (1): 4246. PMID 8675262. edit
    10.^ Tsukamoto, Y.; Komuro, Y.; Akutsu, F.; Fujii, K.; Marumo, F.; Kusano, S.; Kikawada, R. (1988). "Orthostatic hypertension due to coexistence of renal fibromuscular dysplasia and nephroptosis". Japanese circulation journal 52 (12): 14081414. PMID 2977192. edit
    11.^ Takada, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Kazatani, Y.; Azechi, H.; Hiwada, K.; Kokubu, T. (1984). "Orthostatic hypertension with nephroptosis and aortitis disease". Archives of internal medicine 144 (1): 152154. PMID 6362595. edit
    12.^ Hoshide, S.; Parati, G.; Matsui, Y.; Shibazaki, S.; Eguchi, K.; Kario, K. (2011). "Orthostatic hypertension: Home blood pressure monitoring for detection and assessment of treatment with doxazosin". Hypertension Research. doi:10.1038/hr.2011.156. PMID 21918522. edit
    13.^ Moriguchi, A.; Nakagami, H.; Kotani, N.; Higaki, J.; Ogihara, T. (2000). "Contribution of cardiovascular hypersensitivity to orthostatic hypertension and the extreme dipper phenomenon". Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension 23 (2): 119123. PMID 10770258. edit
    14.^ Kario, K. (2009). "Orthostatic hypertension: A measure of blood pressure variation for predicting cardiovascular risk". Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society 73 (6): 10021007. PMID 19430163. edit
    15.^ Fan, X. H.; Sun, K.; Zhou, X. L.; Zhang, H. M.; Wu, H. Y.; Hui, R. T. (2011). "Association of orthostatic hypertension and hypotension with target organ damage in middle and old-aged hypertensive patients". Zhonghua yi xue za zhi 91 (4): 220224. PMID 21418863. edit
    16.^ Fessel, J.; Robertson, D. (2006). "Orthostatic hypertension: When pressor reflexes overcompensate". Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology 2 (8): 424431. doi:10.1038/ncpneph0228. PMID 16932477. edit
    17.^ Kario, K.; Eguchi, K.; Hoshide, S.; Hoshide, Y.; Umeda, Y.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Shimada, K. (2002). "U-curve relationship between orthostatic blood pressure change and silent cerebrovascular disease in elderly hypertensives: Orthostatic hypertension as a new cardiovascular risk factor". Journal of the American College of Cardiology 40 (1): 133141. PMID 12103267. edit
    18.^ Yatsuya, H.; Folsom, A. R.; Alonso, A.; Gottesman, R. F.; Rose, K. M.; Aric Study, I. (2011). "Postural changes in blood pressure and incidence of ischemic stroke subtypes: The ARIC study". Hypertension 57 (2): 167173. doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.161844. PMC 3214760. PMID 21199999. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3214760.